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CANADA REPORTS AGREEMENT TO DROP MORSE

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by AA7BQ, Jan 22, 2005.

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  1. AA7BQ

    AA7BQ QRZ Founder QRZ HQ Staff QRZ Page

    INDUSTRY CANADA REPORTS "OVERWHELMING AGREEMENT" TO DROP MORSE

    Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) reports that an Industry Canada (IC)
    analysis has found "overwhelming agreement" that Canada should move away
    from retaining a Morse code requirement as "the sole means of gaining
    access" to the HF amateur bands. IC has posted a summary of comments from
    the amateur community to RAC's Recommendations from Radio Amateurs of
    Canada to Industry Canada concerning Morse Code and Related Matters.

    "Amateurs should note that while the responses heavily favored deletion of
    the Morse Qualification as a requirement for access to the HF bands,
    Industry Canada still has to make and announce a decision on Morse
    retention or deletion," RAC emphasized. IC reported 123 comments in favor
    of relaxing the code requirement in Canada and only 19 "clearly opposed."
    Another six comments were inconclusive.

    The regulatory agency also has attempted to gauge the level of support for
    each of RAC's 12 license restructuring recommendations. IC said it would
    formulate a plan to implement changes emerging from the consultation
    process.

    RAC notes that until IC announces a decision to delete Morse, Canadian
    amateurs not holding the Morse Qualification may not operate on the HF
    bands.

    The Industry Canada comment summary is on IC's Web site
    http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/epic/internet/insmt-gst.nsf/en/sf08280e.html

    Here in the US, the FCC has made no recommendation or decision regarding
    the future of the current 5 WPM (Element 1) Morse requirement for HF
    access. It's also reviewing several petitions, including one from the
    ARRL, that propose further Amateur Radio license restructuring.


    Material from The ARRL Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or
    in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to
    The ARRL Letter and The American Radio Relay League.
     
  2. K6BBC

    K6BBC Platinum Subscriber Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    It's the end of the world as we know it.

    K6BBC
     
  3. KC0W

    KC0W Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    The great GIVE AWAY has already started up north & is marching it's way south. Amateur radio will surely be great here in the USA when we have a bunch of 2 meter repeater op's on HF.


    Tom kcØw
     
  4. M0DTE

    M0DTE Ham Member QRZ Page

    - and i feel fine!

    i passed my uk rae in 1991 but never applied for my callsign until 2004 - back then i was never really interested in vhf - just hf dx and no interest in cw whatsoever (i trained to be a marine radio officer in 90-92 and did morse at 10wpm - my college experiences of morse training put me off the mode completely). I took the decision to apply for my callsign after the morse restriction was lifted here in the uk. ironically after 6months on the air i now have a keen desire to (re)learn cw (i feel im missing out on something great!) and i use vhf daily. - you see the fact is if the uk RA (ofcom)hadn't dropped the cw requirement i wouldnt even be operating at all. I had been without any radio equipment for a number of years but now spend most of my free time (and money!) on the radio or home-brewing a new antenna/interface -

    Thats not a bad thing - surely!

    take care

    73 de

    Chris
    m0dte
     
  5. WT4M

    WT4M Ham Member QRZ Page

    Is this really the end of the world?  Perhaps it already ended when we reduced the code speed.  How many of those who learn the code continue to use it?
    Since I have learned, I have enjoyed copying and intend to jump in with both feet, when I get the opportunity.
    IMHO, we should keep the code requirement as it currently stands.  I believe that it is essential that operators at least be able to copy at slow speed, in the event of catastrophic emergencies (such as those of late).  But I don't think that requiring the code (at any speed) will ensure "noble & reverent" operators.

    73,
     
  6. W1YW

    W1YW XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    I'm good.

    We're just a weeee bit slow in the south...

    73,
    Chip N1IR
     
  7. KC7JTY

    KC7JTY Banned QRZ Page

    Its amazing how different the Canadians are from us. In many ways they are more mature & less like children (as is the rest of the world).
    There are however things about them that can really tick me off. The code thing is not one of them. Listening to you guys moan about the decline of Morse is joy extraordinaire to yours trully. I'll be savoring it for some years to come.
     
  8. KU2US

    KU2US Ham Member QRZ Page

    I personally hope the FCC KEEPS the code requirement here in the USA. it is one of the only things that differentiates us from Chicken Band operators. It separates the DO'ERS from the wannabees, it separates those who are serious about ham radio, from those who just want to put a mic up to their mouths and yell "Radio Check". Yes, I agree about last ditch effort emergency communications, CW has got it all over SSB. It makes me sad that folks now days just want things just handed to them, instead of working for it. "its just to hard, I will never use it, its outdated, digital is faster, I have a cell phone, repeaters are cool, it keeps new hams out, it takes away from new technology" all lame brain excuses presented in the past. If a NEW ham wannabee really yearns for a ham license, They will Learn the code and all they have to do is "ask" for help, and it will be there in droves.When are folks going to realize, like it, use it or not, Code separates us from GMRS, FRS, CB and even "EchoLink" which I feel is NOT ham radio. I am a "Slow Know Code" Ham. This doesnt make me better than anybody else, but at least down deep I know I earned my license, and belong to a group that wants to keep ham radio the way it was intended to be-something better than CB.Example-"Radio check, Break/Break, ten-four, whats your "20", Raddiddio" all commonplace on some 2-meter repeaters, and now creeping into HF. I know Im going to get flamed for this, but TO BAD. Anybody can get a book and learn the answers before the test, anybody now can  get an Extra class license in 2 -weeks, which means, also, ANYBODY CAN LEARN THE CODE, too! My Advance class license is mine for life (Maybe), and Im keeping it. It is the only license now, to me, that means anything anymore. I am not degrading anyone, I dont care how you got your license, if you operate in the spirit and consideration that ham radio was meant to be. KEEP THE CODE.....Ken
     
  9. KF4ZNL

    KF4ZNL XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    I WOULD LIKE THE FCC TO DROP THE CODE FOR THE GENERAL CLASS LICENSE. I HAVE MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS (MS) IT'S CAUSED COGNITIVE AND MEMORY PROBLEMS. I MANAGED TO PASS WRITTEN PART AFTER A YEAR OF VIDEOS AND ONLINE TEST. AND I MONITOR HF. AND FIND THAT THAT THE LANGUAGE THAT I FIND OFFENSIVE ON UPPER BAND'S  40 THRU 160 METERS TO BE AS BAD OR EVEN WORSE THAN THAT OF CB'ERS!!!! SO DO SAY THAT BECAUSE I CAN'T PASS MY CODE TEST THAT I'LL ACT LIKE A CB'ER. BY THE WAY I WAS A TRUCKER AND USED CB OFTEN NOT ONLY FOR TRAFFIC INFO BUT TO RAG CHEW TILL MS CAUSED ME TO LOOSE MY CDL.
     
  10. vk3aof

    vk3aof Guest

    Learning the code is like learning to shoe a horse to get a drivers license
     
  11. VE2ZOK

    VE2ZOK Ham Member QRZ Page

    From one of the sissies in the North...First of all everything works by supply and demand. Also, you fine Americans profess to freedom being of utmost importance and freedom world wide . Please then, practise what you preach. Be tolerant of others and allow freedom to take it's course. When something or some system is protected by restraining rules, it usually ends up dying or disappearing. Morse code will always exist as a matter of fact there are people in our sissie radio club who can rattle of 18 words per minute. I haven't heard that very often down south. There are many aspects of our radio and all have to be respected. The real danger some day will not come the Hams but from the government. They will eventually steal your bands and frequencies. God Luck to all domains and all people everywhere
     
  12. N4LI

    N4LI Ham Member QRZ Page

    Yes, but how does all of this relate to making a Fan Dipole?

    [​IMG]

    Peter, N4LI
     
  13. VE3IOS

    VE3IOS Ham Member QRZ Page

    We already do. Don't expect this change anytime soon people, things move slow in the frozen tundra [​IMG]
     
  14. N7WSB

    N7WSB Ham Member QRZ Page

    Everyone said the same thing back when no-code tech came along (end of amateur radio, end of the world etc). None of it ever came true and I'll tell you why: no one is that interested in amateur radio on any scale that really makes a difference. There are no masses waited at the gates to get on hf or amateur radio in general. You could give away extra class licenses at the street corner - I'd bet money no-one would do anything with them. A lot of this stems from the undisputable fact that we are so much better connected today then we were 10-15 years ago. When I want to make a phone call when I'm out and about I use my mobile phone - it works great, I can use it for anything I like and its cheap. When I want to send electronic mail I have a 3 megabit cable line (that a million times faster than 1200 baud packet radio). You get the point.

    People will disagree with this statement - even though its pretty much what was said back in the early 90's in QST magazine (they used giving away extra class tickets at the superbowl as an example though). Tuning across the bands you'll hear traffic, but not nearly as much as it used to be. In Portland (population over a million) there are more than 50 repeaters around here, however only two or three are ever used with any constancy.
     
  15. AA1MN

    AA1MN Ham Member QRZ Page

    Why do those who complain about change in amateur radio continue to be operators?

    When you got your license did you expect that regulations would remain the same forever?  For that matter, do you expect anything in this world of ours doesn't change?

    Don't amateur radio operators count the ability to adapt to changing situations one of their strong points?

    Hmm, guess not ... and to think so many of you berate CBers who are so much more adaptable -- you never hear them complaing about the inevitable demise of CW requirements do you?

    Chuck, AA1MN
     
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