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Ham Talk Live! Episode 89 - Puerto Rico Disaster Communications with Val, NV9L

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by WB9VPG, Nov 7, 2017.

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  1. K0IDT

    K0IDT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Is your power setup documented somewhere? If not it should be, just a thought.
     
  2. N6MED

    N6MED Ham Member QRZ Page

     
  3. N6MED

    N6MED Ham Member QRZ Page

    Gary / KN4AQ, I think you nailed some of the ARRL ARES planning and preparation deficiencies.

    You can bet your bippy that there will be repeats of PR in the future. Guam is only about 22 miles long & has experienced bad wind before. Also Kauai.

    A question to the ARRL: why should the hams have been “’writing the book’ on something new?” To plan for a worst-case scenario, i.e., where the entire telecom and public utilities infrastructure has been impacted really isn’t rocket science. There are, no doubt, many “prepper” hams out there who have already considered such a scenario.

    “Emcomm training … localized?” Yup on all counts. By Tom Gallagher / NY2RF’s own admission (ref the latest QST issue), the Ham Aid kits were woefully lacking. ARES training is indeed localized to a fault. I live in an area where the ARRL Section extends over a couple of hundred miles with numerous ARES Districts within. But for an exercise a few years ago by a certain ngo where ARES was invited to participate, the local Section had not attempted nor trained (to the best of my knowledge) for section wide inter-comms. All has been localized.

    “… reputation of ‘I'm from Ham Radio…’ “ Hams have made themselves persona non grata by trying to be the tail wagging the dog.

    The ARRL might do well to:

    1. Develop a disaster emcomm plan. (This would necessitate the ARRL getting serious about emcomm which seems to have otherwise taken a back seat to radio sport.")
    2. Build comprehensive Ham Aid go kits that will support HF, VHF, UHF voice & digital comms (PACTOR modems and TNCs), broadband HF antennas, VHF/UHF antennas, laptops AND portable printers, portable power, etc. etc.
    3. Incentivize ARES membership and training that certifies levels of >practical< expertise (e.g. demonstrated phone practices, digicom proficiency, etc.). This would create a cadre of hams ready to cross ARRL jurisdictional boundaries ready and able to provide mutual assistance.
    Or, maybe the ARRL could be content to continue on deploying people based on whether or not they were breathing…
     
    W1YW likes this.
  4. K0IDT

    K0IDT Ham Member QRZ Page

    That and the whacker contingent have not done the service any good. The infighting among the various ham groups is also a problem, "I'm in charge, no, I'm in
    charge"........

    The ARRL might do well to:

    >>Get out of the emcomm buisness, the NTS revolt created Radio Relay International it can be done.
    1. Develop a disaster emcomm plan. (This would necessitate the ARRL getting serious about emcomm which seems to have otherwise taken a back seat to radio sport.")
    >>For what particular disaster should the plan be developed ? Cascadia Rising, Zombie apocalypse, global climate change or maybe the shelter is out
    of donuts? The only thing the ARRL is serious about is increasing membership.

    2. Build comprehensive Ham Aid go kits that will support HF, VHF, UHF voice & digital comms (PACTOR modems and TNCs), broadband HF
    antennas, VHF/UHF antennas, laptops AND portable printers, portable power, etc. etc.

    >>I can understand go kits but not from HQ. These should be available locally or at least regionally to replace equipment lost due to the event. Forget the laptops
    and other digital junk, lowest common denominator is a radio and mic and that should be enough for comms immediately after the event. The digi stuff
    is a nice selling point and if you want to use it later on to send email go for it, depends on how fast the locals can access services through other means
    how useful this actually is........think Harvey, cellular wi-fi and Zello.

    3.Incentivize ARES membership and training that certifies levels of >practical< expertise (e.g. demonstrated phone practices, digicom proficiency, etc.).
    This would create a cadre of hams ready to cross ARRL jurisdictional boundaries ready and able to provide mutual assistance.

    >>Nice idea but it only reinforces the idea that hams are communicators first and volunteers second. If the first question you ask when showing up to an event
    isn't "how can I help" you probably shouldn't be there.

    Or, maybe the ARRL could be content to continue on deploying people based on whether or not they were breathing…

    >>Or maybe they could just get out of the way. A lot of the comms during Harvey were not ham and not coordinated by someone with an ego larger than the
    event.

    A final thought, why are hams even involved with emcomm? The common mantra, "when all else fails", is becoming less of a reality in today's world.
     
    W1YW likes this.
  5. KG7LEA

    KG7LEA Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I should think that the host ARES group and its served agency would be in charge of other ARES members and groups. Anyone unable to conform is sent home.

    Hams imported by NGOs will report to the NGOs, but there will need to be coordination of their communications operations and amateur band useage. Local government may exercise control too. This is where some advance planning is needed. If the Red Cross deploys Relocation Teams with amateur radio, those teams are controlled by Red Cross, but their amateur comms should come under the umbrella of the host ARES group. It could be as simple as incorporating them into an existing net or allocating the teams their own repeater or simplex frequency.
     
  6. KG7LEA

    KG7LEA Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    As everyone knows, Kein Plan überlebt die erste Feindberührung (no plan survives contact with the enemy).

    The best thing we can do is be good at the skills we have and keep thinking outside the box. I tell volunteers that it is like training for the Superbowl and when you show up it's a soccer game. We train for the big earthquake and tonight we are on alert for a big wind storm. Even the parades, marathons, bike rides, and back country foot races help us be better volunteers and better communicators.
     
    WU8Y likes this.
  7. KG7LEA

    KG7LEA Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Can you clarify and expand upon this?
     
  8. JUVENCIO

    JUVENCIO QRZ Member

    Hurricane Maria is the reason I started studying for my license. As I understood it was for this community (HAM Radios) that much of the work was performed locally. Thanks to all of you that were involved!!
     
  9. K0IDT

    K0IDT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Maybe you can comment on this https://qninewsletterdotnet.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/qni-2016-8-4.pdf
    Some of the same personalities are still involved and present for PR. Planned months in advance and still
    turned into a pissing contest, good thing it was only a SET.
     
  10. K0IDT

    K0IDT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Either a student of history or that's a common expression in your area of expertise. Molte, I had to look it up :), did get it right though.
    You can only plan for the beginning of an event, after the opening gun it's "adapt and overcome".

    Sure can. The Cajun Navy used Zello along with various other groups and individuals to set up networks using technology most people
    were familiar with and had available. I would be willing to bet there was more traffic over the cell networks than ham radio. Most people
    have a cell phone today, not very many have a 2m HT or HF rig in their back pocket. I said it in another thread, give the disaster victims
    a way to communicate and get out of the way they'll handle the rest. Why should someone in a disaster be expected to know about hams
    and then go find one to get his message out?

    Here's an example, the local 911 service went down and the hams were activated. They were stationed around the city and locations
    announced over AM/FM stations. You had to be listening to those stations to know 911 was out, where the hams were located and
    what to do to get emergency services. Nice idea but I'm having a heart attack or my house is on fire or worse yet wrapped my car
    around a tree. Most smart people would just call the non-emergency numbers to get service or break out the weenies and marshmallows
    to make the best of a bad house fire situation.


    PR was a good indicator of what might happen during a total grid down scenario and the various NGO's and govt. agencies should be rethinking
    their comm capabilities and needs. Hams are becoming less and less needed as time goes on and that's a good thing because it means the
    primary systems are more robust today than even a decade ago, PR was a very rare incident.
     
    NL7W likes this.

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