JS8Call for Emergency Communications

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by KM4ACK, Sep 27, 2019.

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  1. KN4CRD

    KN4CRD Ham Member QRZ Page

    Anyway...y'all stay tuned for JS8Call 2.0. Some very nice things are right around the corner!
     
    KK4HPY, KA2FIR, KF7VUT and 1 other person like this.
  2. KD2NPA

    KD2NPA Ham Member QRZ Page

    Can you point me to the exact point in the video where he uses the word "deployment" or even infers some type of structured response? You seem to be looking at this through your learned experience of emcom which is totally different from what he is talking about. I realize that CERT is big down here in FL (I'm in Broward), but its virtually non existent in a lot of parts of the country. Believe it or not, there are still places where the majority residents roll up their sleeves and take it upon themselves to respond to disasters without the need for a structured government command system.

    You are also forgetting that a lot of the situations/challenges of disaster recovery are different in other parts of the country than in FL. For example, I was at my house in the woods of northwest NJ for Sandy and the immediate aftermath was far more difficult to deal with than Irma was down here. Why? Because you have far more and different types of trees/terrain with fewer public works resources (my town is 82 square miles, yet only 25k residents). My house is in a community that is on top of a mountain and we were effectively cut off by hundreds of down trees and a landslide for 18-24 hours (which would have been longer if we as private citizens weren't helping to cut our own way out). In that situation debris cleanup was the #1 priority, communication was basically useless because no one could get to us anyway.

    I won't even get into civil unrest scenarios where security is the #1 priority and government can't provide it.

    P.S. It's self important know-it-all's like yourself that are the reason I don't want to join CERT.
     
    KK4HPY, W0FW, KA4DPO and 1 other person like this.
  3. KD7YVV

    KD7YVV Ham Member QRZ Page

    P.S. It's self important know-it-all's like yourself that are the reason I don't want to join CERT.[/QUOTE]

    Hi, Every group at one time or another has a ham who is a know it all.
    I tend to keep my business to myself, do what the served agency asks of me,
    and follow 1-7 in my post above. I joined CERT and I did so to learn new things.
    There are those with "Specialized High Intensity Training" who believe they can
    save the world with their ****. I've met a few in my time but I didn't let them stop
    me from learning something new, meeting new people, and contributing my own
    knowledge. I've learned over the years, by following my 1-7 above, that I can be
    an asset instead of a liability. The CERT course can be fun, and as I said, I learned
    new things. Might want to give it another look.

    --KD7YVV (Keeping myself sane by scaring myself every morning looking in the mirror.)
     
  4. KM4WUO

    KM4WUO Ham Member QRZ Page

    Having deployed in an actual emergency where comms were non-existent (Puerto Rico after Maria hit), I was glad to have HF. Problem was, HF propogation sucked rocks. If JS8Call had been available then, I could have easily dispatched the messages I needed to both as part of the job and to my wife back home. The tie in with APRS and SMS means that you can do a number of things to communicate with EOC officials in unaffected areas in the same way you would if comms were working locally.

    As to Amateur radio being used in actual emergencies, I can think of numerous examples. At the large scale, support to the California wildfires over the last 2 years has been extensive. Obviously Puerto Rico had some issues after Maria hit. When Hurricane Michael clobbered the Florida panhandle, there was one EOC that suddenly went offline and there was no way to contact them. Note that most of the Florida EOCs have all the latest gee-whiz digital comm gear courtesy of a lot of Uncle Sugar grants. But, even with all that, the EOC went QRT. FEMA asked the SHARES organization to mobilize the Amateur Radio community in addition to SHARES participants to find out the status of the EOC. An Amateur radio operator was able to go to the EOC, make contact, and relay their status (building damaged and all comms cut off) back to FEMA via SHARES.

    So, yes, when (not if) all the expensive gear fails, good old radio is there to back up the first responders. JS8Call is a very good tool worthy not just of consideration, but as a requirement for hams and others that are providing emergency communications for public agencies, NGOs, or family and neighbors. I like it, I have it installed on all the computers that are connected to my emcomm rack radios, and plan to use it in the next disaster I'm deployed to just like I have Winlink and FLDigi installed.
     
    W8APP likes this.
  5. N5EQY

    N5EQY Ham Member QRZ Page

    Man you have been HAD, big time. Some scammer using a similar or near similar call got ya, or maybe you are an enemy of JS8????
     

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