zero

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by ND5Y, Apr 5, 2013.

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  1. AB1QP

    AB1QP Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Right purty, too..can you m0ve it?
     
  2. KJ4VTH

    KJ4VTH Ham Member QRZ Page

    Not a mound -- it's a helluva mesa we got into.
     
  3. N3PDT

    N3PDT XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    "Why?"

    "Railroad's comin' through - Right now."
     
  4. AB1QP

    AB1QP Premium Subscriber QRZ Page


    And for the punch line......... WHØØØ-WHØØØØ!
    Thanks for playing!

     
  5. K7KBN

    K7KBN Ham Member QRZ Page

    I used to live near Fort Stinking Desert (aka Nellis AFB), and close enough to the cobalt testing range to be able to see the big mushrooms when they grew them above ground.

    Now there's black stuff coming out of the ground, but it's only what's left of the artesian springs that formerly watered "The Meadows" (in Spanish : ͈Las Vegas" - one of the Seven Cities of Gold).

    Civilization - HO!
     
  6. N0IU

    N0IU Ham Member QRZ Page

    Sometimes black stuff coming out of the ground can be a good thing!
    jed-clampett%u0025252520Rifle.jpg
     
  7. K7KBN

    K7KBN Ham Member QRZ Page

    Scalp 'em, Tantric!
     
  8. AE5DX

    AE5DX Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    When I write the word "Zero" I put a line thru the Z. Looks like a 2 sometimes.
     
  9. K7KBN

    K7KBN Ham Member QRZ Page

    Steve - that's what we've been referring to as a "slashed Z" or "slashed Zed". I never learned any "slashed" letters or numerals in school - at least until my sophomore year in High School when I was reading and learning about this "ham radio" thing. The zero was always slashed upper right to lower left ("per bend sinister" for you heraldry scholars). The slashed Z and 7 didn't really start until I was working with Navy linguists and learned that even touching the pen/pencil to the paper in a random place could completely change the meaning of a sentence. Sort of:

    Let's eat Grandma!
    versus
    Let's eat, Grandma!
     
  10. K5FH

    K5FH Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Similarly, it pays to be VERY familiar with the language customs of those with whom you do business...as Lockheed Martin found out the hard way. A simple punctuation mistake cost them $70M.

    http://money.cnn.com/1999/06/18/worldbiz/lockheed/
     
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