Worked All States

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by N2EY, Oct 16, 2018.

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  1. WE4E

    WE4E Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Right on, Dave. Not many anywhere who can say that.

    Yeah, receivers separate the men from the boys. I'll be interested to see the developments in the Type 8. ;)

    What he said.
     
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  2. W4ZD

    W4ZD Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Nawwww, wait for number 9... Number Nine, Number Nine, Number Nine... :p
     
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  3. WA4KCN

    WA4KCN XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    That reminds me of the Byrd expedition to Antarctica in 1934, and the Author Collins involvement with admiral Byrd using Collins equipment on the ship to Antarctica and at the camp once there. Mr. Collins used his personal station as a relay located in his parents home in Cedar Rapids to CBS broadcasters. The use of Collins equipment and the copy from Antarctica helped kick start Collins Radio.
     
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  4. W7UUU

    W7UUU Super Moderator Lifetime Member 133 Administrator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    I remember reading that years ago.... great story!!

    Dave
    W7UUU
     
  5. N2EY

    N2EY Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Thanks for the kind words.

    The Type 7 and the Type 6 before it are transceivers, which is a whole 'nuther level of complexity, because a heterodyne system that works well for receiving may not be good for transmitting, and vice versa.

    I have a couple of ideas.....

    Type 8 Concept #1:

    The VFO would tune from 5.1 to 5.4 MHz.

    To transmit on 20 and 80 meters, the VFO signal would be mixed with the signal from a crystal oscillator at 8.9 MHz, giving output on 14 to 14.4 MHz (additive) and 3.8 t0 3.5 MHz (subtractive). To transmit on 40 meters, the VFO signal would be mixed with the signal from a crystal oscillator at 12.4 MHz, giving output on 7.3 to 7.0 MHz (subtractive).

    To receive 20 and 80 meters, the VFO signal would be mixed with the received signals to give a first IF of 8.9 MHz. To receive 40 meters, the VFO signal would be mixed with the received signals to give a first IF of 12.4 MHz.

    On receive, the first IF of 8.9 or 12.4 MHz would be mixed with the signal from a crystal oscillator at 7.5 or 11 MHz, to give output on 1.4 MHz. The 1.4 MHz signal would be filtered by crystal filters as is done in the Type 7.

    This design has the advantage of relative simplicity, lack of spurs, and using the excellent filters of the Type 7. Also, it may be possible to implement RIT by making the second conversion oscillator a VXO. But it has the disadvantages of only covering 80, 40 and 20, and having 20 tune backwards on the dial. The 300 kHz tuning range means a 50 turn tuning capacitor on the VFO will give a tuning rate of a bit more than 6 kHz, which is kinda fast for me.

    Type 8 Concept #2:

    Rather than building a new transceiver from the ground up, the Type 6 would be improved by the use of better tubes, circuits and components. (The Type 6 was built 30+ years ago, when the junk box and knowledge base were smaller). The Type 6 uses the Heathkit SB-line heterodyne scheme and a Heathkit CW filter, so the heterodyne math will not be given here. Since the CW/data parts of the 80, 40, 20 and 15 meter bands are 200 kHz or less wide, the tuning range would be limited to 200 kHz or even 150 kHz, resulting in simpler requirements for the tunable-IF bandpass filters and a tuning rate of 3 to 4 kHz with a 50 turn tuning capacitor. No bands would tune backwards and a lot of work would be saved by reusing the Type 6. (It may be argued that this concept should be called "Type 6 Mark II" or "Type 6A".)


    Type 8 Concept #3:

    This concept would use a 5 MHz VFO and 9 MHz IF filter, plus a premixer for various bands, as follows:

    80 meters: 5.0 MHz VFO plus 7.5 MHz crystal gives 12.5 MHz premixer output, which is 9 MHz above 3.5 MHz and tunes upwards
    40 meters: 5.0 MHz VFO plus 11.0 MHz crystal gives 16.0 MHz premixer output, which is 9 MHz above 7.0 MHz and tunes upwards
    20 meters: 5.0 MHz VFO alone, which is 9 MHz below 14.0 MHz and tunes upwards
    15 meters: 5.0 MHz VFO plus 7.0 MHz crystal gives 12.0 MHz premixer output, which is 9 MHz below 21.0 MHz and tunes upwards

    This design has the advantage of relative simplicity, But it has the disadvantages of possible spurs (the third harmonic of the VFO is at 15 MHz, which can be an issue when tuning 40 meters and wanting output on 16 MHz).

    ----

    In addition, there is a concept which would greatly simplify bandswitching. The Type 6 and Type 7 both use the same transmitter circuits for all bands, resulting in a lot of bandswitches and the need for retuning when changing bands - a hindrance in contests. Also, the circuits tend to be compromises in order to work on multiple bands.

    So what could be done is to build separate one-band transmitter sections, optimized for each band. This would eliminate retuning during contests, and the circuits would be optimized for each band. The same meters and power supply would be used for all the transmitter sections.

    This would mean lots of cabling, relays for switching, and sheet metal work, but would probably improve contest performance. The parts pile has enough to do the job, and it's really simpler than building a multiband transmitter section.

    ---

    Well, you did ask.....

    73 de Jim N2EY
     
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  6. WE4E

    WE4E Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I did, and I really enjoyed reading that. Thanks for taking the time to write it up.
     
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  7. N2EY

    N2EY Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    That's the short version.....

    Some other projects:

    1) Take a Tempo One and convert to CW-only operation. Replace the finals with 6146s, make a new circuit board with CW IF filter, take out all the unneeded stuff.

    2) Take an HW-101 and convert to CW-only operation. Maybe transplant a Tempo One VFO into it.

    Only problem is that the above are not really homebrew.

    3) Build an external 2nd VFO. Currently the only way to work split with the Type 6 or Type 7 is to use the RIT.

    4) Build a CW-only transceiver based on the S-line heterodyne scheme. IF filter in the 455-500 kHz range, VFO, heterodyne crystals and tunable IF similar to Collins. The limited 200 kHz tuning range would be a non-issue.

    There's more.....

    73 de Jim, N2EY
     
  8. WE4E

    WE4E Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I think I envy your discretionary time as much as I do your abilities. :p
     
  9. KB2FCV

    KB2FCV Ham Member QRZ Page

    I got a late start, but started chasing the ARRL thing they did for their 100th... where you have states on for a week at a time on various bands / modes. It was WAS Triple Play & more served up on a silver platter. I wound up getting Triple Play all confirmed up in LoTW. Before I paid attention to this, I had all 50 worked in one form or another but had to confirm one or two more states. I still haven't sent in for the certificates.. maybe one of these days I will (I chase after DX awards..)
     
  10. N2EY

    N2EY Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    And....the certificate arrived:

    WAS.jpg

    I'll have to get a proper frame for it; it's too big to go into the book. It came rolled up in a mailing tube, so no chance of it getting creased in the mail.

    73 de Jim, N2EY
     
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