When are the good openings coming back...

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by KB4MNG, Oct 31, 2019.

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  1. K1LKP

    K1LKP Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    BAND SPRAY.jpg
     
  2. K1LKP

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    INSTANT SUNSPOTS.jpg

    ======= N9HI_Have_a_Nice_Day.gif
    AND HAVE LOTS OF FUN ON THE BANDS
     
  3. WA9SVD

    WA9SVD Ham Member QRZ Page


    You have something against Martha?:confused::D
     
  4. K1LKP

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    MARTHA 130 FT TOWER.jpg
     
    W4ZD likes this.
  5. N1FM

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    Between 1788 and 1825 - the solar cycle was extremely weak - it looks like new cycle 25 may rival those weaklings!

    Need more data to compare the severity of winter in the Upper Midwest of the United States during the last Little Ice Age: Refer to the winters of 1680/1681 and 1747/1748 and the mega-tsunami that struck Taiwan and the 1783 comet impact hypothesis.

    Year - Number of spotless days

    1849 1
    1850 7
    1851 0
    1852 4
    1853 6
    1854 70
    1855 234
    1856 261 spotless days - 1856 low point
    1857 70
    1858 2
    1859 0
    1860 0
    1861 2
    1862 4
    1863 2
    1864 7
    1865 44
    1866 86
    1867 222 spotless days - 1867 lowpoint
    1868 37
    1869 2
    1870 0
    1871 0
    1872 0
    1873 14
    1874 12
    1875 131
    1876 190
    1877 140
    1878 280 - An amazing 280 spotless days!
    1879 217
    1880 33
    1881 5
    1882 2
    1883 4
    1884 0
    1885 13
    1886 62
    1887 104
    1888 150
    1889 212 spotless days - 1889 lowpoint
    1890 171
    1891 24
    1892 0
    1893 0
    1894 0
    1895 1
    1896 7
    1897 32
    1898 39
    1899 104
    1900 158
    1901 287
    1902 257 spotless days - 1902 lowpoint
    1903 45
    1904 1
    1905 3
    1906 4
    1907 0
    1908 4
    1909 6
    1910 75
    1911 200
    1912 254 spotless days - 1912 lowpoint
    1913 311
    1914 153
    1915 12
    1916 4
    1917 0
    1918 0
    1919 0
    1920 7
    1921 46
    1922 134
    1923 200 spotless days - 1923 lowpoint
    1924 116
    1925 29
    1926 2
    1927 0
    1928 0
    1929 0
    1930 3
    1931 43
    1932 108
    1933 240 spotless days - 1933 lowpoint
    1934 154
    1935 20
    1936 0
    1937 0
    1938 0
    1939 0
    1940 0
    1941 5
    1942 24
    1943 65
    1944 159 spotless days - 1944 lowpoint
    1945 16
    1946 0
    1947 0
    1948 0
    1949 0
    1950 3
    1951 0
    1952 23
    1953 131
    1954 241 spotless days - 1954 lowpoint
    1955 48
    1956 0
    1957 0
    1958 0
    1959 0
    1960 0
    1961 6
    1962 10
    1963 21
    1964 112 spotless days - 1964 lowpoint
    1965 70
    1966 8
    1967 0
    1968 0
    1969 0
    1970 0
    1971 0
    1972 0
    1973 27
    1974 20
    1975 95
    1976 105 spotless days - 1976 lowpoint
    1977 25
    1978 0
    1979 0
    1980 0
    1981 0
    1982 0
    1983 4
    1984 13
    1985 83
    1986 129 spotless days - 1986 lowpoint
    1987 44
    1988 0
    1989 0
    1990 0
    1991 0
    1992 0
    1993 0
    1994 19
    1995 61
    1996 165 spotless days - 1996 lowpoint
    1997 61
    1998 3
    1999 0
    2000 0
    2001 0
    2002 0
    2003 0
    2004 3
    2005 13
    2006 65
    2007 163
    2008 265 spotless days - 2008 lowpoint
    2009 262
    2010 44
    2011 2
    2012 0
    2013 0
    2014 1
    2015 0
    2016 27
    2017 96
    2018 208
    2019 228 spotless days (so far) - Will we exceed the 1878 lowpoint of 280 spotless days?


    http://sidc.be/silso/IMAGES/GRAPHICS/spotlessJJ/Spotless days per year.txt

    Please note that the number and stretches of spotless days may differ from those of other sources (e.g. NOAA,…). The reason for this is simply because we (SILSO) are using a different network than e.g. NOAA (their Solar Region Summaries (SRS) are at https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/solar-region-summary). Here at SILSO, we use our own network (mostly European-based). The possible hours of observation are different from station to station and thus from one network to another, including the ones NOAA uses. The differences that are observed in the spotless days streaks are linked to small sunspots (not easy to see when they are there) with a short lifetime (not observed the whole day) that were observed by our network and not noticed by its NOAA counterpart.

    On the other side of the coin - DX was great in 1780 and 1960...

    [​IMG]

    Look just above at the trend from 1980 to the present departing cycle...

    http://www.sidc.be/silso/ssngraphics
     
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  6. W4HM

    W4HM XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    At daytime 80 meter radio wave propagation is off of the E layer. It takes a high takeoff angle from a low dipole to get through the lossy D layer and reach the E layer. Hence working a station only 200-300 miles.

    At night time the D layer ionization is very weak and the E layer weak, so an 80 meter radio wave propagation signal can get through to the F layer for refraction for some DXing.
     
    N0TZU and (deleted member) like this.
  7. WA9SVD

    WA9SVD Ham Member QRZ Page

    Actually, "GOOD" is subjective. "GOOD" :confused:to some means 5x9x9 (or 5x9+++) strong signals world-wide, 24/7,:rolleyes: with a 1.5 kW (or more,) and a five element beam. I see good conditions when I can get through (even a pile-up) with a low dipole and a :("measly" 100 Watts.:rolleyes:

    Seriously, while "good" conditions are often what was remembered but not accurate, Ol' Sol will do what he/she wants., and that will be "the stuff of which history is made of."

    [If you pardon the English:oops::(] I'm using an American colloquialism:(, but then we usually speak :eek:an American brand of English, anyway. W. Churchill one said that we are two separate countries divided by a common language.(or similar.) we call an auto front opening a HOOD, and you call it a "bonnet." So be it! "God save the Queen (or King, as the case may be) "that should one need UK repairs in the "hind quarters... " I have the deepest respect for all.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2019
  8. N2EY

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    Well it's almost 4 PM local time, and I'm hearing Europeans pounding in on 40 CW. Croatia, Latvia, and others. Sure, they're big contest stations, but there they are.
     
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  9. NN4RH

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    K8BZ and (deleted member) like this.
  10. KE0GXN

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    Any time there is a DX contest going on. :D
     

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