What's the difference between a bridge rectifier and a rheostat?

Discussion in 'Radio Circuits, Repair & Performance' started by ELECTRONERD122, Feb 25, 2021.

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  1. ELECTRONERD122

    ELECTRONERD122 QRZ Member

    I started learning the ropes of electronics just a few weeks ago and my question may sound stupid for a pro like you, but I’m still going to test my luck and - hopefully - somebody here will help me out. Thin is, I’ve been trying to figure out the difference between a bridge rectifier and a rheostat. When it comes to bridge rectifiers I guess I mostly understand how it works...

    What’s the biggest conceptual difference between the two? Thanks
     
    K1LKP likes this.
  2. WA0YDE

    WA0YDE Ham Member QRZ Page

    Do a search....basic electronics. Lots of info online. Get a handbook also.
     
    PU2OZT, K1LKP and AJ4GQ like this.
  3. W1NB

    W1NB XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    They are two very different components. A rheostat is generally a variable resistor, that is a resistor who's value can be changed by some mechanical or electronic means.

    A bridge rectifier is an array of four diodes that converts alternating current (AC) into direct current. In a basic sense, diodes allow current to pass in one direction but blocks current from passing in the opposite direction. So, a bridge rectifier is a combination of four diodes that are configured to allow the current to pass in only one direction, converting AC to DC. The difference between a bridge and a single diode (half wave rectifier) or a two diode array (full wave rectifier), is that the additional diodes allow both the positive going and negative going peaks of a sine wave to be added to the DC, directly decreasing the amount of filtering needed to make the rectified AC smooth, rippleless DC, and indirectly increasing the current capability and, to a degree, its resulting DC voltage.

    Here is a full explanation of what a rheostat is: https://eepower.com/resistor-guide/resistor-types/rheostat/

    Here is a full description of a full wave bridge: https://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/diode/diode_6.html
     
    K1LKP likes this.
  4. K1LKP

    K1LKP Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    DEAR ELECTRON NERD,

    WELCOME ABOARD.

    I SEE THAT YOU ARE NEW TO THE WORLD OF THE QRZ FORUM

    THANK YOU FOR JOINING THE RANKS OF THE QRZ FORUM FOLKS .
    ( WE ARE BETTER KNOWN AS THE ZEDDERS ).

    HERE IS A GOOD HEAD START THAT SHOULD NOT CAUSE ANY FINANCIAL BURDEN.

    https://www.classcentral.com/tag/electronics

    THERE ARE MANY MORE PAGES THAT OFFER FREE COURSES.

    73 - K1LKP

     
    WA0YDE likes this.
  5. G3YRO

    G3YRO Ham Member QRZ Page

    Hmm . . . I've been trying to figure out what you really mean . . .

    Your question is a bit like asking what's the difference between a carburretor and a brake disc !

    Perhaps there's a different word you meant to post, instead of Rheostat? (or maybe this is just a wind-up?)

    Roger G3YRO
     
    PY2RAF and K7JEM like this.
  6. W7UUU

    W7UUU Principal Moderator Lifetime Member 133 Administrator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page



    Your IP address places you at Kyiv, Ukraine. If that is correct, perhaps we can point you to an amateur radio club in your area of Ukraine to help you in your continued studies locally?

    Perhaps you can start with http://ut7ut.com/ for local references for hands-on tech info? Hands-on learning very often is the very best way to learn these concepts.

    Dave
    W7UUU
     
  7. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    What's the difference between an apple?:)
     
  8. WN1MB

    WN1MB XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Troll much?
     
  9. KQ8W

    KQ8W XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    How is a question like this when someone is learning considered trolling?
     
  10. WN1MB

    WN1MB XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Last edited: Feb 25, 2021
    AG6QR likes this.
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