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What's the deal with ham radio? What are you hearing?

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by NW7US, Nov 18, 2015.

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  1. NW7US

    NW7US Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Shortwave radio has been a source for great sci-fi, since radio first became a "thing."

    In this video, I share some of the types of signals one might hear on the high frequencies (also known as shortwave or HF bands)... the first video in an on-going series introducing amateur radio to the interested hobbyist, prepper, and informed citizen.

    I often am asked by preppers, makers, and other hobbyists, who've not yet been introduced to the world of amateur radio and shortwave radio: "Just what do you amateur radio operators hear, on the amateur radio shortwave bands?"

    To begin answering that question, I've taken a few moments on video, to share from my perspective, a bit about this shortwave radio thing:



    From my shortwave website:

    Shortwave Radio Listening -- listen to the World on a radio, wherever you might be. Shortwave Radio is similar to the local AM Broadcast Band on Mediumwave (MW) that you can hear on a regular "AM Radio" receiver, except that shortwave signals travel globally, depending on the time of day, time of year, and space weather conditions.

    The International Shortwave Broadcasters transmit their signals in various bands of shortwave radio spectrum, found in the 2.3 MHz to 30.0 MHz range. You might think that you need expensive equipment to receive these international broadcasts, but you don't! Unlike new Satellite services, Shortwave Radio (which has been around since the beginning of the radio era) can work anywhere with very affordable radio equipment. All that you need to hear these signals from around the World is a radio which can receive frequencies in the shortwave bands. Such radios can be very affordable. Of course, you get what you pay for; if you find that this hobby sparks your interest, you might consider more advanced radio equipment. But you would be surprised by how much you can hear with entry-level shortwave receivers. (You'll see some of these radios on this page).

    You do not need a special antenna, though the better the antenna used, the better you can hear weaker stations. You can use the telescopic antenna found on many of the portable shortwave radios now available. However, for reception of more exotic international broadcasts, you should attach a length of wire to your radio's antenna or antenna jack.​
     
    KD8ZMN likes this.

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