We Are Not Alone In The Universe!!

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by KG4KWW, Jun 1, 2004.

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  1. KD4AMG

    KD4AMG Ham Member QRZ Page

    [​IMG] Hoow powerful of a telescope would one need to take pictures of the stuff that the astronauts LEFT BEHIND when they were supposed to be on the moon ?

    I know they were at different locations on the different landings, but how strong of a telescope would it take and how much effort would it require to actually take PICTURES to prove that they were really on the moon and not somewhere else ( like a film studio, or the desert some where ? )

    Yea, yea I know your answer already: The objects are too SMALL to be seen through a telescope...yada yada..the objects are about the size of 3 - 4 vehicles here on earth, and seeing them would be like " being on the moon and taking pictures of vehicles at a wal-mart parking lot in xxx city ".....blah blah blah [​IMG]

    Well, IF these telescopes can SEE these objects in space millions & billions of miles away from earth, looks like they could see those objects on the moon ( if there was actually something to see ....oops ! ) [​IMG]
     
  2. KN6Z

    KN6Z Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (ai4ep @ June 08 2004,13<!--emo&amp;[​IMG])</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Hoow powerful of a telescope would one need to take pictures of the stuff that the astronauts LEFT BEHIND when they were supposed to be on the moon ?[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    We could do a back-of-an-envelope calculation.  The resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope is about 50 milli arc seconds.  That's 50/3600 of a degree.  That means that the scope can &quot;see&quot; an object that takes up 50/3600 of a degree in its field of view.  That could be a grain of sand nearby, an asteroid far away, or a galaxy billions of light years away.  So how big would an object on the moon need to be to occupy (or &quot;subtend&quot; in math jargon) 50/3600 of a degree?  We can find out by multiplying the angle that the object subtends in radians, by the distance to the moon.  50 milli arc seconds is 0.0002424 radians.  The distance to the moon is 384,000,000 meters.  Multiplying the two numbers, I get 93 meters.  Hubble can't see anything on the moon smaller than about a football field in diameter, at best.  The resolution of the telescope would have to be about ten times better to see the decent stage, and about a hundred times better to see footprints.  It won't be that long before we WILL have images of lunar hardware.  A probe in orbit about the moon could see the stuff quite easily if it were equipped with a spy satellite-quality camera.

    The astronauts left carefully aligned little mirrors on the moon, off of which we bounce lasers to make precise measurements of the distance to the surface.  Other instruments left on the moon have radioed back volumes of data.  I don't know which, if any, still operate.  Of course, we also have hundreds of pounds of moon rocks.

    When you do get your pictures, won't you dismiss them as fakes?
     
  3. KN6Z

    KN6Z Ham Member QRZ Page

    Skepticism is always ok with me. For those who do not believe the moon landings happened, I wonder where they draw the line as to which space missions, manned or unmanned, really happened.
     
  4. KG4KWW

    KG4KWW Banned QRZ Page

    Here's the latest from NASA:

    [​IMG]

    NASA joined the world today in viewing a rare celestial event, one not seen by any person now alive. The &quot;Venus transit&quot; -- the apparent crossing of our planetary neighbor in front of the Sun -- was captured from the unique perspective of NASA's Sun-observing TRACE spacecraft.

    The top image shows Venus on the eastern limb of the Sun. The faint ring around the planet comes from the scattering of its atmosphere, which allows some sunlight to show around the edge of the otherwise dark planetary disk. The faint glow on the disk is an effect of the TRACE telescope. The bottom left image is in the ultraviolet, and the bottom right image is in the extreme ultraviolet.

    The last &quot;Venus transit&quot; occurred more than a century ago, in 1882, and was used to compute the distance from the Earth to the Sun. Scientists with NASA's Kepler mission hope to discover Earth-like planets outside our solar system by searching for transits of other stars by planets that might be orbiting them.

    If people miss the June 8 Venus transit, they will have another chance in 2012 (June 6). After that, there will not be another Venus transit until 2117 (December 11).

    Video Of Venus Transit

    It's the end of da world, I tell ya!!!
     
  5. KN6Z

    KN6Z Ham Member QRZ Page

    We finally get a good pic of a UFO disk, and it's explained away as a frigging Venus transit? COME ON! WAKE UP PEOPLE!
     
  6. K6PME

    K6PME Ham Member QRZ Page

    Don't worry, Coast to coast will have it all straightened out in no time at all.
     
  7. KG4KWW

    KG4KWW Banned QRZ Page

    This quote just in from BC the X Pres:

    <span style='color:red'>Repent, you sinners, Repent Now, say your sorry for looking at all those naked women and watching all those sex movies and thinking all those dirty thoughts, Repent, like I have done!!! Bill [​IMG]</span>

    <span style='color:blue'>The invaders from Venus are on their way!!! [​IMG] </span>
     
  8. KG4KWW

    KG4KWW Banned QRZ Page

    Isn't it amazing that communications to our space probes taking pictures of the transit, and the rovers transmitting back data to Earth, were not affected.

    Also, it appears that communications on Earth it's self were not affect too.

    Interesting!!  [​IMG]

    This quote just in from BC the X Pres:

    <span style='color:blue'>Repent, you sinners, Repent Now, say your sorry for looking at all those naked women and watching all those sex movies and thinking all those dirty thoughts, Repent, like I have done!!! Bill  

    The invaders from Venus are on their way!!!  </span>
     
  9. w5zzq

    w5zzq Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (kg4kww @ June 08 2004,17:20)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">This quote just in from BC the X Pres:

    <span style='color:red'>Repent, you sinners, Repent Now, say your sorry for looking at all those naked women and watching all those sex movies and thinking all those dirty thoughts, Repent, like I have done!!! Bill  [​IMG]</span>

    <span style='color:blue'>The invaders from Venus are on their way!!!  [​IMG]  </span>[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    Good grief Charlie Brown!!!! [​IMG]
     
  10. KG4KWW

    KG4KWW Banned QRZ Page

    <span style='color:blue'><span style='font-size:15pt;line-height:100%'>Update From Nasa On Cassini Saturn Space Probe</span></span>

    The Cassini Probe is closing in on Saturn for it's history making mission.

    The high clouds of Saturn's bright equatorial band appear to stretch like cotton candy in this image taken by the Cassini narrow angle camera on May 11, 2004. The icy moon Enceladus (499 kilometers, or 310 miles across) is faintly visible below and to the right of the South Pole. The image was taken from a distance of 26.3 million kilometers (16.3 million miles) from Saturn through a filter centered at 727 nanometers. The image scale is 156 kilometers (97 miles) per pixel. No contrast enhancement has been performed on this image.

    [​IMG] Cassini-Space-Probe-Pic-Of-Saturn-Atmospheric-Detail-and-Moon-Enceladus (lower right)

    The most complex interplanetary mission ever launched is about to meet one of the solar system's enigmatic moons. Cassini will fly by Saturn's largest outer moon, Phoebe, on Friday, June 11. The closest approach is at approximately 1:56 p.m. Pacific Time, just 19 days before Saturn arrival.

    A final trajectory correction maneuver is scheduled for June 16. On arrival date, June 30, Cassini will become the first spacecraft to orbit Saturn. Once in orbit it will conduct an extensive, four-year tour of the Saturn system, including its majestic rings and many known moons.

    &quot;The arrival date and trajectory to Saturn were specifically selected to accommodate this flyby, which will be the only opportunity during the mission to study Phoebe at close range,&quot; said Dave Seal, mission planner for the Cassini-Huygens mission at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. &quot;Phoebe's orbit is simply too far from Saturn, at almost 13 million kilometers (about 8 million miles), nearly four times as far as the next closest major satellite, Iapetus. A later encounter is not feasible.&quot;

    &quot;The last time we had observations of Phoebe was by Voyager in 1981,&quot; said Dr. Torrence Johnson, former Voyager imaging team member, Galileo project scientist and current Cassini imaging team member. &quot;This time around, the pictures of the mysterious moon will be about 1,000 times better, as Cassini will be closer.&quot; Voyager 2 captured images of Phoebe from about 2.2 million kilometers (about 1.4 million miles) away. Cassini will obtain images from a mere 2,000 kilometers (about 1,240 miles) above the moon's surface.

    Cassini will also collect spectroscopic and radar data that could decipher the composition and origin of this distant moon. Cassini's Phoebe images, already twice as good as any image returned by Voyager 2, show large craters and variation in surface brightness.
     
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