Tierny and abuse of power

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by KD7QYU, May 12, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
ad: l-rl
ad: Subscribe
ad: abrind-2
ad: Left-3
ad: L-MFJ
ad: Left-2
ad: l-BCInc
  1. K6UEY

    K6UEY Ham Member QRZ Page

    KCØLNU,
    No Dan that only applies to the newbies who have less than 10 years in Amateur Radio,but those who have been around  for awhile and know what Amateur Radio is all about are well aware they are far more than a step above the average ignorant snook on the street,or CB'er.
    That's part of the problem,with todays so-called Amateur Operator.Just passing an entrance exam,is such an elevated thrill to the average Amateur he takes on visions of Grandeur and begins to think he knows all there is to know. When in reality all he has done is qualify, to put his name on the list of those who DO want to learn.That's part of the challenge and the allure of Amateur Radio to those who are sincere about learning. In my 50 year association with Amateur Radio I'm still learning,and hopefully if I stay active and the new people don't ruin it for everyone I will continue to learn,that's what puts Amateur Radio Operators several steps above the klutz who passes the entrance exam then becomes stagnant,Hell anyone with normal faculties can accomplish that much.
    As an Amateur Radio Operator,one should strive to learn all they can, and polish their skills as trained operators and Electronics Experts. Take pride in accomplishment of not being the average klutz, but having earned the knowledge and title afforded one who is several steps above the average.
     
  2. W5HTW

    W5HTW Ham Member QRZ Page

    Finally dawned on me. He wasn't talking about Gene Tierny. He meant "tyranny."

    Hope he remembers to thank his school teachers.

    Aww, nuts

    Ed
     
  3. N8CPA

    N8CPA Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (K6UEY @ June 03 2004,16:14)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">KCØLNU,
    No Dan that only applies to the newbies who have less than 10 years in Amateur Radio,but those who have been around  for awhile and know what Amateur Radio is all about are well aware they are far more than a step above the average ignorant snook on the street,or CB'er.
    That's part of the problem,with todays so-called Amateur Operator.Just passing an entrance exam,is such an elevated thrill to the average Amateur he takes on visions of Grandeur and begins to think he knows all there is to know. When in reality all he has done is qualify, to put his name on the list of those who DO want to learn.That's part of the challenge and the allure of Amateur Radio to those who are sincere about learning. In my 50 year association with Amateur Radio I'm still learning,and hopefully if I stay active and the new people don't ruin it for everyone I will continue to learn,that's what puts Amateur Radio Operators several steps above the klutz who passes the entrance exam then becomes stagnant,Hell anyone with normal faculties can accomplish that much.
    As an Amateur Radio Operator,one should strive to learn all they can, and polish their skills as trained operators and Electronics Experts. Take pride in accomplishment of not being the average klutz, but having earned the knowledge and title afforded one who is several steps above the average.[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    I've only been licensed half as long as you, Orv.  And I can't count how many times I have explained in the last 13 years, that Amateur Radio was at least 50 years older than CB to some recent licensee.  Some seem to have an all but insurmountable pre-conception that Amateur Radio was created because of over-crowding of CB.  

    Where does such misinformation originate?

    At least as of 8 years ago, there was even a popular myth among some newcomers that Part 97 privileges trump Part 95 restrictions--e.g. that becoming Tech Plus empowered the use of high power on CB.  Most of those who believed it would not accept any kind of Elmering otherwise.  

    It was a popular belief on one particular wide area repeater system.  I think it's also worth noting that the system became semi-private after it was over-run by lids who just couldn't seem to keep track of which microphone was being keyed.  For a while before its privitization, it was becoming known as &quot;145channel19.&quot;  Too bad its profile and capability were such attractive lid magnets.
     
  4. W5HTW

    W5HTW Ham Member QRZ Page

    Yes, I think it is true a lot of current ham/CBers do believe CB was the first radio and ham was a spin-off from that. That is why, I guess, they insist on bringing the CB lingo into ham radio, and not allowing hams to have their own traditional lingo. Well, it's one reason. The other is they are just too lazy to learn a new operating technique.

    Many of them come into ham radio, truly, thinking they are already vastly experienced in radio, as they have been a CBer for 20 years or so. They can't grasp that it is a different applecart (and, of course, it won't be if that attitude continues) and they come into here as newcomers, needing to start at the bottom and learn. However, the FCC and the ARRL have made it easier to start at the top, and apparently recognize that CB radio IS 'ham radio experience' after all, so your friendly CBer can hop in here and become an instant Extra (expert) ham in no time at all.

    Before CB (and, yes, there really WAS a 'before CB') hams began with a learning license, the Novice. Today they think they have already served their learning time on 27 mhz (or the freebands) and should be immediately granted top level licenses in ham radio. They have, they think, served their dues and they already know all they will ever need to know about ham radio.

    How sad. But it is more and more the future of this hobby, and it is certainly irreversible. The only question left is how quickly it will accelerate.

    Ed
     
  5. N0OV

    N0OV Guest

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (K6UEY @ June 02 2004,14:14)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">In my 50 year association with Amateur Radio I'm still learning,and hopefully if I stay active[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    UEY

    You sound like the Elmer who got me interested in Amateur Radio.

    Like you, I'm not in this for the status -- I like learning something new and enjoy the challenge of finding new ways to communicate when equipment limitations or band conditions present &quot;challenges&quot;

    I am glad you didn't read the earlier post as an attack on you -- because that was not how it was intended.

    My only point is it's not a CB issue -- it's a culture and behavior issue.  The &quot;all about me&quot; crowd is messing things up for everyone else who learn long ago sometimes its better (and more fun) to work with others and learn.  

    To the folks using CB behaviors on repeater and HF -- one of the cool things about Amateur Radio is most of the folks I've met try to keep things professional and fun.  That same radio discipline comes in real handy when frequencies are needed to share information in an emergency.  CB issue aside, this professionalism and discipline is important.  CB lingo is no substitute for established prowords when bands are poor or quick communication is needed in an emergency.

    I think it's cool that someone who started in CB makes the jump.  Shows they like radios and interested in learning more.  However, those who get the license because they think it gives them the authority to own a linear amp they can use on the CB frequencies......not cool.  Play by the rules or go elsewhere -- your behavior is not appreciated and is making it bad for others who truely want to learn.    

    Thanks for the feedback -- there isn't a day that goes by that I don't learn something new from this crowd.  Hopefully we an QSO sometime.

    Cheers
     
  6. KB1JCY

    KB1JCY Ham Member QRZ Page

    First off, can we get off the Ham vs. CB debate. The horse is already rotten smelly.

    Allow me to play office chair ARC club president...

    Irregardless of whom thinks their &quot;right&quot;, I sense a breakdown in the leadership of this club. The handling of the disabled member shows that they have their head up their posterior. Since we're only getting half the story, it's possible that the member w/ disabilities has certain &quot;issues&quot;. Our club has a situation similar to the RTC were we have a member with certain &quot;issues&quot;. It's a delicate issue where there are no easy answers. But now the RTC has opened itself to a lawsuit by engaging in win-lose tactics. Generally our approach is to seek to the best of our abilities a win-win.

    Another leadership breakdown is how the leadership of the RTC handles members that come &quot;from the other side of the tracks&quot;. I clearly see blatant arrogance and snobbery here. You cannot be an effective mentor/leader if you can't be empathetic to those who seek your direction. Gandi once said &quot;Anger and intolerance are the twin enemies of correct understanding.&quot; I haven't heard what was done to intervene and coach former CB'ers. I'd like to hear how it was done. If you dropped the ball on this responsibility, shame on you. A club leader is tasked with mentoring all members.

    Closed door meetings often signal insecurity within the leadership core. Stuff like this resembles Robert Cormier's &quot;The Chocolate War&quot;.

    This dramafest thread shows that the club's leadership is out of touch with the membership. This could of been avoided if open communication was encouraged. From my experience, fights break out when there are communication breakdowns -- particularly where a section of membership feel that they are not being heard.

    I saw a few opportunities for the leadership to be proactive (based upon this QRZ.com dramafest). Sadly some of those opportunities were missed.

    This isn't unique to the RTC. I see this way too often in the clubs in my back yard. And sadly the negative politics and bull-crap is killing the hobby. I don't know where people get the inspiration to become club leaders. Don't run for an official position if you honestly do not have the skill set to be a leader.

    It's not an easy job. Our club is at start-up phase and it still can be rather challenging.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

ad: WildEagle-1