ROTATOR using WIFI without cables

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by AH6TX, Jun 12, 2019.

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  1. AH6TX

    AH6TX Ham Member QRZ Page

    I understand there is either a rotator that you can control through WIFI without having to run a very log cable or a modification to do so. If you have information to this degree please let me know.

    Thanks

    AH6TX
    Howard Krawitz
    661-821-0923
    gvm920@gmail.com
     
  2. N6PAT

    N6PAT Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    You still must run a long cable for the power don't you?
     
    K0UO and W0IS like this.
  3. WA7F

    WA7F Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Funny, I was thinking the same thing about SteppIR’s new wireless link.
     
  4. KA8NCR

    KA8NCR Ham Member QRZ Page

    I guess you could run a bias T and send DC through the coax.
     
  5. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Might work with rotators having DC motors; most use AC motors and brake solenoids.
     
  6. N2EY

    N2EY Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Why would it matter?

    Why would DC be OK but not power-frequency AC?
     
  7. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    The bias-T injectors use RF chokes and RF coupling caps to separate the DC signal (which goes through the chokes and is blocked by the caps) from the RF signal.

    Chokes at 60 Hz would be mighty big. This might be possible if homebrewed, but I’ve never seen such a product on the market.
     
    K0UO likes this.
  8. N2EY

    N2EY Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    You're mistaken, Steve.

    The point of the chokes is to keep the RF out of the DC or low-frequency AC feed. They need to have high impedance at RF, not 60 Hz.
     
    N2SR and K3KIC like this.
  9. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Yes, you’re correct...my mistake!

    The only issue is that the commercial bias-T products I’ve seen use chokes rated at low current, like 500mA or 1A and they’d have to be beefed up a bit to handle the current of a rotator motor...probably 3A-4A rated RFCs should work okay, depending on the motor current requirement.
     
  10. KP4SX

    KP4SX XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Cable TV uses power inserters in the distribution line to inject AC power. Typically rated at 15A. The chokes aren't very large at all. Maybe a dozen turns of #14 over a 1mm core. A 4A choke could use wire as small as 20-22 ga.
     

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