Radio Amateurs To See Reallocation Of Portions Of Microwave Band

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by W1YW, Aug 11, 2020.

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  1. W1YW

    W1YW Ham Member QRZ Page

    It's official--

    US radio amateurs will lose 50 MHz from the 3300 MHz band in a spectrum auction in December 2021.

    The 200 MHz segment (3300-3500 MHz) is used on a secondary basis for radio amateurs in the US, and the FCC has recommended doing away with the allocation altogether.

    It is not known at this time whether radio amateurs will retain all or some portion of the remaining 150 MHz.

    https://techcrunch.com/2020/08/10/t...ounces-major-midband-spectrum-auction-for-5g/
     
  2. W1YW

    W1YW Ham Member QRZ Page

    *Now* is the time to lobby for retaining some smaller --20 MHz -- for example, portion of the remaining allocation.

    If not, the remaining 150 MHz will go up for a second auction in 2022, IMO.
     
    W7XLR, WQ4G, K0UO and 1 other person like this.
  3. W1YW

    W1YW Ham Member QRZ Page

    Picture for accompanying (above) Amateur Radio News OP

    upload_2020-8-13_11-41-49.png
     
    JE2VQT likes this.
  4. W1YW

    W1YW Ham Member QRZ Page

    Kindly note it is not my intent to foment arguments here...I only want to point out that some damage is now done--we lost 50 MHz--and it is not clear if we can retain any of 3300-3450MHz.

    We need more information as to whether NTIA will or has sought to continue with that 150 MHz of spectrum on an exclusive basis.

    73
    Chip W1YW
     
    KA5RIO likes this.
  5. W1YW

    W1YW Ham Member QRZ Page

    Dave ,

    We lost 50 MHz of spectrum, not the 50-54 MHz band allocation at 6m.

    We had 3300-3500 MHZ shared with gov't users. Now, we likely have nothing, but the official statement so far is that we lost 3450 to 3500 MHz. It will go up for mid-band 5G auction in Dec 2021. The info is in the link.

    Hope this clarifies anyone's confusion.

    Thanks for bringing it up!

    73
    Chip W1YW
     
  6. W7UUU

    W7UUU Super Moderator Lifetime Member 133 Administrator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    Thanks for the clarification - I deleted my post once I realized that's what you meant.

    Dave
    W7UUU
     
    W1YW likes this.
  7. KF5LJW

    KF5LJW Ham Member QRZ Page

    As an amateur in today's world I certainly understand why hams feel under attack for for the UHF and higher frequencies. Hams keep loosing allocation and a trend that will continue. The story would be different if hams utilized those frequencies, but few do anything. Today UHF and Microwave frequencies are a commodity. Broadcast TV lost a lot of spectrum.

    With 5G requires a lot of bandwidth, and carriers will pay billions to own frequency. 5G comes to life above 1 Ghz and beyond with 2 to 5 Ghz being the sweet spot mix of bandwidth and distance. HF is safe as there is no real interest in the lower frequencies cuz you can't get 50 Mhz bandwidth on 29 Mhz carrier. Get up in Microwave and 200 Mhz bandwidth is easy.

    Use it or lose it. Or buy it for a few billion.
     
    W7XLR and NK8I like this.
  8. WJ4U

    WJ4U Ham Member QRZ Page

    Aren't those the bands Technicians should be taking advantage of, rather than waiting for tiny slivers of HF?
     
    WB4YAL, NK8I, K9GLS and 2 others like this.
  9. W6RZ

    W6RZ Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    In reality, we haven't lost any UHF/SHF spectrum since November 1984, over 35 years ago. And we were partially reimbursed for that spectrum loss with the addition of 902 to 928 MHz.
     
    WD8AJJ likes this.
  10. KB9MWR

    KB9MWR Ham Member QRZ Page

    I have been pointing out for a while now, that our allocations above 900 MHz are the future of ham radio in my opinion. The regulations for anything data or spread spectrum are very relaxed unlike below 900 MHz. So being able to adapt modern consumer hardware to ham use won't require an act of congress (literally: our regulations below 900 MHz are way out of date and to stringent). And above 900 MHz is fairly idle, so bothering incumbent ham radio things like repeaters that sit and id all day, won't be a big issue.

    So it's a shame when a sliver of "our future" is taken. I blame that on the status quo. You know the abundant number of folks who only scratch the surface of the hobby, thinking there isn't much more to it than their baofeng ht.

    New ideas and exploration can happen above 900 MHz today if you are the exploratory/engineering type of person.
     
    WB4YAL, NK8I, K8XG and 1 other person like this.

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