Procedure

Discussion in 'Straight Keys - CW Enthusiasts' started by KB1CKT, Aug 26, 2015.

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  1. KA2CZU

    KA2CZU XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    yes, but have also used BK in non-net qso's and have heard other ops do the same.
     
  2. KB1CKT

    KB1CKT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Yep. I'm rusty, barely making contacts; I spend vastly more time copying code from practice files than I do off the air, let alone talking to someone. I don't recall seeing a thread about proper procedure here, so I thought a thread might do us good.
     
  3. K3XR

    K3XR Ham Member QRZ Page

    In 55 years of operating CW...to turn it back to the other station send 'K' from time to time 'BK' as in asking a question. End of QSO 'SK'.... all work fine no problems.
     
  4. SM0AOM

    SM0AOM Ham Member QRZ Page

    Professional radio operations and especially international operations, were critically dependent on procedure.
    The intentions behind the ITU procedures were that wherever in the world you called a ship, an aircraft, a ground or coast station exactly the same ways of working should be expected and applied. The ITU Radio Regulations and their associated manuals were the 'gospel'.

    Evolution has resulted in the abolishment of Morse in almost all professional and military Communications, leaving it to us radio amateurs preserving its heritage.
    In the 'old days' amateur radio was justified by the planned use of self-trained Morse radio operators in a future war, and the amateur radio operations and commercial/military procedures were quite closely aligned.
    Most, if not all, radio amateurs strived after 'the professional touch' in their operating style.
    Today, almost no one shows any demand for proper procedures.

    In a way, a similar transformation has happened to the technical side of amateur radio.
    Not too long ago, it was considered a matter of honor to emit signals above reproach. The technical requirements of the Radio Regulations were closely observed and splatter or key-clicks were shunned about.

    As a former radio operator and as a radio systems engineer approaching retirement, I can only lament the decline in operating and technical standards that has become commonplace today.

    Finally, I have heard the most proper use of CL on the air at some occasions, when the 500 kHz coast stations went off the air forever in the wake of the GMDSS introduction.

    It was with a lump in my throat that I listened the final 500 kHz transmission from Stockholm Radio/SDJ ending with a CL, ending an 101 year long era of Morse Communications in the Baltic. The party that was hosted by the operating agency after the closing could not erase the feeling of a 'death in the family'.

    73/
    Karl-Arne
    SM0AOM
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2015
    WA1GXC, K8PG, VK5EEE and 1 other person like this.
  5. KB1CKT

    KB1CKT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Located a list of Q codes that I printed off long ago.

    QRT: "Shall I stop sending? Stop sending." Huh, I always though its common usage was "closing shack and heading off to bed."
    QRM: "Is my transmission being interferred with? Your transmission is being interferred with" followeded by 1-5 (1 is nil, 5 is extremely).
    QRN: "Are you troubled by static? I am troubled by static" followed by 1-5.
    I don't think I've heard QRM/N followed by a number for a report. Just as a report of it being present, like QSB, which oddly does not have number.

    QNx codes: were those only used for CW nets on amateur frequencies? Curious.
     
  6. AG6QR

    AG6QR Subscriber QRZ Page

    R means "I received (copied) everything you sent". In the phonetic alphabet used by US troops during WWII, the letter "R" was pronounced "Roger". When radio communications started migrating over to voice, people carried over the use of "Roger" to mean, "I copied what you said". It means exactly the same thing on voice as on CW.

    By the way, "Roger" does not mean "Yes"; it means "I copied and understood". You may sometimes hear it misused on voice as a response to a question, where "affirmative" would be more appropriate.
     
  7. SM0AOM

    SM0AOM Ham Member QRZ Page

    There were special Q-codes inofficially adopted for amateur radio traffic handling.
    These are unrelated to the regulation Q-codes.
    The QNA to QNZ Q-codes have been assigned to the ICAO for use as service abbreviations in the aeronautical services.

    "QNA Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Answer in prearranged order". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNB Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Act as relay station between ..... and .....". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNC Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "All net stations copy. I have a message for all net stations".
    QND Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning"Net is directed (controlled by net control station)". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNE What indication will my altimeter give on landing at ...(place). Also adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Entire net stand by". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNF Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Net is free (not controlled)".
    QNG Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Take over as net contol station".
    QNH What should I set on the sub-scale of my altimeter so that the instrument would indicate my elevation if I were on the ground at your station. Also adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Your net frequency is high".
    QNI Between what heights above ...(datum) has turbulence been observed at ...(position). Also adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Net stations report in" OR "I am reporting into the net". (Follow with a list of traffic or QRU).
    QNJ Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Can you copy me".
    QNK Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Transmit messages for ..... to .....". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNL Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Your net frequency is low".
    QNM Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "You are QRMing the net. Stand by". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNN Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Net control station is ....." OR "What station has net control".
    QNO I am not equipped to give the information/provide the facility requested Also adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Station is leaving the net".
    QNP Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Unable to copy you" OR "Unable to copy .....".
    QNQ Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Move frequency to ..... and wait for ..... to finish handling traffic. Then send him traffic for .....".
    QNR I am approaching my point of no return. Also adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Answer ..... and receive traffic". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNS Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Following stations are in the net" (Follow with list), when used by Net Control Station OR "Request list of stations in the net", when used by other net members.
    QNT What is the maximum gust speed of the wind at ...(place). Also adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "I request permission to leave the net for ..... minutes".
    QNU Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "The net has traffic for you. Stand by". This code should only be used by the Net Control Station.
    QNV Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Establish contact with ..... on the frequency. If successful, move to ..... and send him traffic for .....". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNW Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "How do I route messages for .....".
    QNX Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "You are excused from the net", when used by Net Control Station OR "Request to be excused from the net", when used by other net members.
    QNY What is the present weather, and intensity thereof, at ...(place). Also adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Shift to another frequency, or to .....kHz, to clear traffic with .....". (This code should only be used by the Net Control Station).
    QNZ Unassigned, but adopted by the ARRL, for use only in CW nets, as meaning "Zero beat your signal with mine".


    73/
    Karl-Arne
    SM0AOM
     
  8. N8AFT

    N8AFT Subscriber QRZ Page

    Here's one I didn't know of and it is out of the Handbook under 'RST System'
    "If the other op's TX has a Chirp add a 'C' after the RST". That's pretty common but not used much.
    "If there's a click add a 'K' after RST".
    Here's the one I knew not of and quoting the ARRL Handbook of 1974; "If the signal has the characteristic steadiness of crystal control add an X".
    Was that a polite way to describe how a classic tube Novice rock bounder should sound? Even a good keying Novice rig without a chirp sounds distincly different. What say OM? 77/73 lane

    PS, I use CL quite a bit and it usually gets mis-understood to mean : I'm wanting a QSO instead of that I am CLosing down for now.
     
  9. W7CJD

    W7CJD Ham Member QRZ Page

    What is BT?
    "separation mark" ?
     
  10. W5BIB

    W5BIB Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    BT = Dah dididit Dah = You use it when you want to say something like, “I’m pausing; this is a break before my next thought.” Or, “I’m filling the air with sound so you will know I’m still alive.” :) "I'm collecting my thoughts & figuring out WHAT to send next" !!!

    In actual message / traffic handling, a BT, separates the "heading" "address", "body" & "signature" of the message.





     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
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