Positive Encouragement

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by N0OV, Jun 9, 2004.

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  1. K0RGR

    K0RGR Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    As an even older saying goes - "If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem."

    Before we can work on the problem, we need to understand it.

    Standing up and accusing the other side of laziness or senility does nothing to solve the problem.

    Yes, new hams really need to know that there is much, much more to ham radio than what they studied in the Technician manual. We established hams need to reach out to them, and draw them into our clubs, and introduce them to other publications and activities beyond yakking on the local repeater. And, we need to understand that not all newbies, maybe even most of them, will not be interested in the same things we are.

    I'm a wacko for digital modes, and I know a number of other folks who are too. All you need is a computer with a sound card and a simple interface you can build in a few minutes. But I'm amazed at how many other people want nothing to do with it - they just want to 'talk' on the radio. I try not to be discouraged!

    The newbies need to understand that there are many, many established hams out there who are very willing to help when they can. Most of us are anxious to share our knowledge.

    Here's a place for newbies that will provide real help...

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HamRadioHelpGroup/

    An excellent group of people, new and old. Yes, you will occasionally receive some preaching about how you should learn the code - learn to live with it - those of us who know the code know how much fun it is, and we know what you're missing. But, nobody is going to twist your arm. If you need a question answered, this group will try. Also, don't overlook the help forums here on QRZ - they are excellent.
     
  2. K6UEY

    K6UEY Ham Member QRZ Page

    KCØODY,
    At the risk of climbing that hill in the snow ,both directions,bare footed, when the bug first bit me,the information was out there but you had to know where to look. Of course there was no Internet and computers was still a fantasy. You could buy a study guide of the questions. But they were not the actual questions, just questions similiar in the catagories that were to be tested. For the answers you had to look them up,which meant reading through the theory,and forming some kind of comprhension of what they were talking about. It was at that point you would seek out a mentor if you could find one (before Elmer was invented ) usually at the local club that met once a month,unless you were lucky to have a Ham in your neighborhood.
    To us of the older generation, having been placed in the position of doing our own research, we can look back and see the advantages it had. Sure at the time we would have prefered to have it spelled out to us like the teacher in school, but the ole story about teaching the man to fish,came into play.In looking for the answers to the questions one would read many things that would later help to make the puzzle take form. One of the prizes of maturity is to accept knowledge that has no immediate need, but can be crucial to understanding as you traverse down the knowledge path.It has been instructed that CW is not to be discussed, but that is one area that some adamantely refuse because they see no immediate need, even it being one of the most basic skills in Radio Communication, but as they mature and move on, knowledge wise that need presents itself,but  then taking the time to learn at such a late date is a major distraction.
    We have talked before and I know you are one that wants to learn and have displayed your sincerety of interest in the Art of Radio Communications. Have you looked at Harry, NØPU's webb site,he offers the US Navy course in basic electronics theory,and even throws in his personal assistance when needed,and as a fellow Ham you can't beat the price anywhere.
    Lots of luck in your quest,remember you have to learn it the first time around,you may not have access the next time you appear on earth...............  [​IMG]
     
  3. K3UD

    K3UD Guest

    I wonder how many new hams are actually coming from the CB ranks. In the 60s and 70s, 80s and early 90s there seemed to be a mass migration From CB to ham radio. The growth numbers in those decades were sometimes 25+%. About 1995 ham radio growth began to go flat for some reason. Presently we are showing small declines every month.

    I think that a lot of the CBers who are coming into the service today are people who operated their CBs a lot like we operate our rigs. Although it is illegal, I am willing to bet that most of them were on the so called freeband, many of which either modified their radios or bought them modified, added high power amps and put up rather decent antennas. Some probably built their own amps.

    Sounds a lot like what we do, although we have a license that says we can do all of that legally. When these CBers decide to become hams, some already know a bit about how radios and antennas work, and probably know a thing or two about propogation.

    That they take their lingo to ham radio is predictible and it is also predictible that they might take issue with someone who would assume they needed to be corrected. When I started out in ham radio I used the term "handle" for name. I still do it a lot today and sometimes have been "corrected" by various ops After I tell them I have been using it for almost 40 years and that it was a common and accepted term for a long time, I sometimes get asked more about it and sometimes I am told that I really should not use it. Lingo comes and goes.

    I tend to agree with those who say that if you hold an Extra Class license you should know how to build a dipole and match it, check the value of resistors, know how to calculate power input, stop asking the questions about why my 100 watt output rig only registers about 20 watts on my wattmeter when on SSB etc.

    This is one of the reasons why you had to have 2 years in grade before you were allowed to take the Extra, and one of the reasons for the old Novice license with its emphasis on making due with very limited privileges in spectrum, modes, power, and mandatory crystal control.

    It is no surprise that someone who has memorized the questions and answers, was able to learn the dreaded code at 5 WPM and was able to get a General or Extra in one VE session with no prior experience in ham radio or electronics, will ask what we feel to be dumb and sometimes stupid questions on this and other forums.

    Believe me when I tell you.... There was no one more ignorant than I was when I passed my Novice test in late 1964. I don't think anyone on this forum managed to do more dumb things than I did while trying to get on the air, and no one butchered more QSOs than I did in my first few months of operations.

    73
    George
    K3UD
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (K6UEY @ June 10 2004,13:54)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Have you looked at Harry, NØPU's webb site,he offers the US Navy course in basic electronics theory,and even throws in his personal assistance when needed,and as a fellow Ham you can't beat the price anywhere.[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    Yeah, I have seen that and I would love to have this in book format... when I'm trying to study this type of thing, I tend to do better if I can pick up a book and take it to a quiet place to study. I may just download a few sections at a time and print them out. It is valuable stuff.
     
  5. N0OV

    N0OV Guest

    George,

    Think you hit several interesting points.

    With some exception in the rural areas, you really don't see alot of CB's any more.  FRS and cell phones have effectively reduced the ranks. (Sure some of the laungage and behaviors on 11 meters also contrinuted to it).  Fact is there's an entire new generation out there who view what you can do over the air completely different. That point hit home during a Red Cross exericise I was on -- kids there could not care less that I could talk on a radio, but hook up an APRS or a packet station and you had their 100% attention

    The other point is about being able to apply what was learned.  Like advance degrees the knowledge isn't worth a hoot unless it can be applied.  

    Jumped from Tech to General I had to learn a little more theory, more about bands and the dreaded CW. Once the test was passed I learned about setting up an HF rig, a lot more about antennas, and how to chase down RFI (because it was interesting and I was pissing off the wife )

    Haven't decided to jump to Extra yet -- want to, just have to get motivated. Key motive is to be operate on some extra bands. The electronics theory for me is a bear, so I have to get in the same mind set I did when I learned CW to jump that barrier and really apply myself.

    When that happens, I'm sure to experience a few more practical lessons learned the book just talked about, but you can't appreciate until you have had the experience.

    Guess for me, passing a test and getting assigned an operating class is not what Amateur Radio is all about.

    I'll always keep an operational CB and FRS radio -- won't use them much, just want to have them available just in case the capability is needed from an ARES perspective.


    For me (in my little world) learning something new, stepping up to the challenge, and getting it done is what makes Amateur Radio fun!
    ------------------------------------------
    Funniest shirt I ever read when I was in the Air Force was being worn by an FB-111 crew chief.

    It takes someone with a college education to break it, and someone with a high school education to fix it!
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (K3UD @ June 10 2004,14:11)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">It is no surprise that someone who has memorized the questions and answers, was able to learn the dreaded code at 5 WPM and was able to get a General or Extra in one VE session with no prior experience in ham radio or electronics, will ask what we feel to be dumb and sometimes stupid questions on this and other forums.[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    No, should not be a surprise, but I guess I'd rather have someone asking questions of those who know than telling them to shut up... there is also a difference between stupid and ignorant. Ignorance can be cleared up with some judicious studying and listening; stupidity tells others that they aren't ignorant and don't need to listen or study. Admitting that I find complex electronic theory to be, well, difficult... is sometimes hard in and of itself.
     
  7. N0OV

    N0OV Guest

    Just checked out hamsexy.com

    After reading that mess, it makes the worst I've seen on QRZ pretty tame.
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (KC0LNU @ June 09 2004,11:29)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">For those of you who don't get this, no problem.  There is plenty of room on 11 Meters   [​IMG][/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    And you were doing so well! But, you just couldn't resist getting in a lame dig at those you consider beneath you.

    Surprise.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (K3UD @ June 10 2004,12:11)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">I wonder how many new hams are actually coming from the CB ranks. In the 60s and 70s, 80s and early 90s there seemed to be a mass migration From CB to ham radio. The growth numbers in those decades were sometimes 25+%. About 1995 ham radio growth began to go flat for some reason. Presently we are showing small declines every month.

    I think that a lot of the CBers who are coming into the service today are people who operated their CBs a lot like we operate our rigs. Although it is illegal, I am willing to bet that most of them were on the so called freeband, many of which either modified their radios or bought them modified, added high power amps and put up rather decent antennas. Some probably built their own amps.

    Sounds a lot like what we do, although we have a license that says we can do all of that legally. When these CBers decide to become hams, some already know a bit about how radios and antennas work, and probably know a thing or two about propogation.

    That they take their lingo to ham radio is predictible and it is also predictible that they might take issue with someone who would assume they needed to be corrected. When I started out in ham radio I used the term &quot;handle&quot; for name. I still do it a lot today and sometimes have been &quot;corrected&quot; by various ops After I tell them I have been using it for almost 40 years and that it was a common and accepted term for a long time, I sometimes get asked more about it and sometimes I am told that I really should not use it. Lingo comes and goes.

    I tend to agree with those who say that if you hold an Extra Class license you should know how to build a dipole and match it, check the value of resistors, know how to calculate power input, stop asking the questions about why my 100 watt output rig only registers about 20 watts on my wattmeter when on SSB  etc.

    This is one of the reasons why you had to have 2 years in grade before you were allowed to take the Extra, and one of the reasons for the old Novice license with its emphasis on making due with very limited privileges in spectrum, modes, power, and mandatory crystal control.

    It is no surprise that someone who has memorized the questions and answers, was able to learn the dreaded code at 5 WPM and was able to get a General or Extra in one VE session with no prior experience in ham radio or electronics, will ask what we feel to be dumb and sometimes stupid questions on this and other forums.

    Believe me when I tell you.... There was no one more ignorant than I was when I passed my Novice test in late 1964. I don't think anyone on this forum managed to do more dumb things than I did while trying to get on the air, and no one butchered more QSOs than I did in my first few months of operations.

    73
    George
    K3UD[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    A well considered and thought out post, more of which are needed here. I think you would be surprised as to how many people come into Amateur radio from CB. I know quite a few here in this area that hold licenses and (gasp&#33[​IMG] still run CB, since CB allows more loose conversational structure, and you dont have some self righteous &quot;observer&quot; sending you a letter telling you that how you operate is frowned on (at least, by the &quot;observer&quot;), and quoting the rules to you. You notice they dont admit you still using their CB, because they dont care to hear the self righteous among us telling them what scum they are because they dont have a license. I have news for you: Not all CBers are the asses many here seem to think they are. Many are family people who use their stations for many different things. Just as haere in Amateur radio, there are a certain percent of asses, but that's just part of the landscape.

    I fail to understand how, just because someone doesn't have a official license, yet are otherwise decent people, is somehow scum, simply because they choose to run a band that the &quot;elete&quot; disapprove of? I would bet that many who make such remarks haven't actually listened to the band in a long time, because, if they had, they would find that the old stereotypes dont apply any more.

    Of course, the old adage still applys: If you dont like it dont go there and if you dont go there you have no place to talk because, by definition, you dont know what you are talking about because you dont go there. And you certainly cant judge everyone on the band just from listening to the asses on channel 19.

    Look around when you are out, both in the city and rural...how many CB antennas do you see? How many ham antennas do you see? Yes, that's right, there are VASTLY more CBers...so what does that tell you if you actually stop and THINK?



    [​IMG]
     
  10. W5ALT

    W5ALT Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (K8GHB @ June 10 2004,20:40)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE"> Look around when you are out, both in the city and rural...how many CB antennas do you see? How many ham antennas do you see? Yes, that's right, there are VASTLY more CBers...so what does that tell you if you actually stop and THINK?[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    OK, I'll take the bait. What do you think it means?

    Maybe that the number of participants is inversely propotional to the required effort?
     
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