Phonetic Alphabet

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by N8CNJ, Aug 20, 2002.

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  1. K3MSB

    K3MSB Ham Member QRZ Page

    Non standard phoentics don't bother me at all.  

    73 de Mark K3ZX
    (Kilowatt Three Zany Xylaphone)
     
  2. W9IND

    W9IND Ham Member QRZ Page

    Standard phonetics are fine most of the time, but having participated in contests and special event stations, I'd have to say that the standard alphabet can often be irritatingly deficient. The biggest problem is with the vowels. Phonetics like Able, Easy and Ocean contain the most distinguishable sounds of the vowels -- long A, long E, long O. But in bad conditions, it's often difficult to pick out words like Alfa and Oscar (which actually sound alike when spoken by some foreign hams, who tend to say, "Ose-kah" instead of "Os-ker").

    So, when communication becomes challenging for whatever reason, it works best on both ends to abandon standard phonetics and substitute words with long vowel sounds and/or multiple syllables. Geographical names work great in this case, especially when you're contending with QSB, QRM, etc. For instance, compare the sound of a weak station saying "...kee" versus "...kohama." Or "...tel" versus "...nolulu."

    Likewise, when I was an op for special event station W87PAX, we often said "Peter-Able-X-ray" instead of "Papa-Alfa-X-ray." Honestly, isn't the first example easier to understand on the first try?

    That's why I don't consider standard phonetics sacred, or even preferable in all cases. As far as I'm concerned, whoever made them up should have field-tested them before approving them. They simply don't cut the mustard when the listening gets tough.

    73 to all,
    Brian, W9IND
     
  3. W0DZ

    W0DZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    K1LCA: It is not necessary to say anything if no one comes back to you. On HF, after calling CQ, you wouldn't generally say "Nothing heard, <callsign> clear" if no one answers. On VHF though, I hear that very thing fairly often. Perhaps the difference is that a repeater is a shared frequency at all times so it seems polite to say it, whereas on HF you can just move to a new frequency and try again. It really doesn't hurt anything to say it, but I don't, for the reason given in the quote you referenced. After all, it's a repeater; if you didn't hear anything, neither did anyone else. It's not a weak signal issue where someone else might have heard a response and you didn't.
     
  4. NG5E

    NG5E XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">&quot;I know that there are certain operating practices that &quot;drive me up the wall&quot; (like calling a station on a repeater, and then when they are not answered, saying something like &quot;KZ9XXX clear after negative contact with KZ9XXY&quot; - everyone knows that they didn't come back to you, just go away![/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>

     The &quot;negative contact&quot; part is indeed superfluous, but
    I have to disagree on the rest.  By stating your callsign followed by the word &quot;clear&quot; you are letting everyone know you have completed your call.

     As for alternate phonetics, I dont care for them but I dont let it bother me either.  Sometimes I find that alternates can be helpful when working a DX station who doesnt speak English very well.  I often replace the &quot;Golf&quot; in my call with &quot;Germany&quot; which seems to be more easily understood by them.  My pet peeve is &quot;N&quot; connectors...  Who can actually put one of those darn things together anyway?  and what do you do with the leftover gaskets?
    [​IMG]

    73,
    Dave, NG5E
     
  5. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    I can put together &quot;N&quot; connectors just fine, and have been doing it for 35 years or so...there aren't any leftover gaskets [​IMG]

    I like phonetics which are internationally recognizable; the &quot;Army&quot; phonetics used in the U.S. aren't particularly good. Names of well known countries and cities are.

    And of course, when counting, always use the following to help...

    1 hen
    2 ducks
    3 squawking gees
    4 limerick oysters
    5 corpulant porpoises,
    etc.

    WB2WIK/6
     
  6. K9KJM

    K9KJM Ham Member QRZ Page

    To NG5E, Give the &quot;newer&quot; TWO PIECE
    &quot;N&quot; connectors a try. Silver plated housing,
    Gold plated center pin. I have had good
    luck with them so far, About the same
    as installing a PL 259 connector......  [​IMG]
     
  7. M3TMC

    M3TMC Banned QRZ Page

    In the UK the correct phoentics are required. Alot of things are required but fashion takes over. Its bad practice to change the phoentic alphabet. What is the point in calling Gambia 0 Canada Japan ect and then when asked to repeat the call change the game by calling in a totaly different way?
    Many regs are flouted. It is correct to start and finish with your call sign evey &quot;over&quot; and if a long over every 15 mins. Most class A holders would say every 15 mins but this is not so. This is so in the UK im not sure anywhere else.
     
  8. M0CVO

    M0CVO Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (M3TMC @ Oct. 31 2002,02:22)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">In the UK the correct phoentics are required. Alot of things are required but fashion takes over. Its bad practice to change the phoentic alphabet. What is the point in calling Gambia 0 Canada Japan ect and then when asked to repeat the call change the game by calling in a totaly different way?
    Many regs are flouted. It is correct to start and finish with your call sign evey &quot;over&quot; and if a long over every 15 mins. Most class A holders would say every 15 mins but this is not so. This is so in the UK im not sure anywhere else.[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>


    Quite right, I was always brought up on the correct phonetics having been a member of the Royal Signals (British Forces).  However, when listening or operating on the DX nets it becomes obvious that a) there are no hard and fast rules regarding phonetics or b) most operators ignore the rules regarding phonetics.  I do believe that in the BR68 the guidelines are that the use of phonetics other than the ITU standard should only be used when they are not liable to obscure the meaning or when they can be mistaken as being offensive.

    73 DE Nigel, M0CVO.   [​IMG]

    nigel_m0cvo@yahoo.de
     
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