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Phonetic Alphabet

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by N8CNJ, Aug 20, 2002.

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  1. N8CNJ

    N8CNJ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Does the misuse of the phonetic alphabet bother anyone other than myself?

    When I spent 4 years as a radio op in the National Guard, I was strictly forbidden to use anything accept the proper phonetics.

    With this being drilled into my head, then when testing for my tech class license, answering questions stating I have to use proper phonetics, I was happy with it. Then I get on the radio and hear "cute" replacement words instead of the proper phonetics.

    Although this bothers me to the point of screaming, I don't say anything. I figure it's not my place.

    Anyway, the question on the table is this....

    Should proper use of the phonetic alphabet be enforced or should they just drop that (silly to most hams) rule and let us use whatever we feel we want to use?

    Chip - KC8SHP
     
  2. KB1GYQ

    KB1GYQ Ham Member QRZ Page

    We all have pet peeves... the regs do not require "standard" phonetics, so it doesn't bother me much. For emergency nets, the standards are better, but for casual use, some of the "funny" ones actually work better; and repeating the callsign using two different sets of phonetics works best.
     
  3. K3XR

    K3XR Ham Member QRZ Page

    chip, kc8shp....i was also a radio op in the national guard for 7 years...and have spent most of my working life in military and semi-military organizations....amateur radio is not a military organization...while there is nothing wrong with the use of military type phonetics in the hobby...they are not a requirement as can be seen by a study of part 97 of the fcc rules and regs....i guess we all have little things that bug us in the hobby i.e. terms carried over from the former 11 mtr ham band....got a copy on me.....

    dan, kilowatt 3 x rated
     
  4. KA0AZS

    KA0AZS Ham Member QRZ Page

    I don't believe that there is any requirement for use of ITU standard phonetic's in Part 97.

    We do ask that check-ins on our local ARES Net use the standards, and when someone uses other or "cute" phonetics, I try to take it as a training opportunity (not everyone has a military/aviation background) and read their callsign back to them using the ITU standard.

    For emergency/public service Ops, I find that the "cute" phonetics simply slow things down, cause confusion, and in general waste time. At other times, I don't think it really matters. Also, I make more allowances for non-native English speakers working HF, after all their English is usually a lot better than my skills in their language!

    The worst problem I ever had was working as a Security dispatcher at a hospital. Trying to interface with the local PD who used "Able Baker...." when my military background made "Alpha Bravo..." automatic.

    73
     
  5. K9STH

    K9STH Platinum Subscriber Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Police departments often use the APCO phoentics which are much different from the ICAO phonetics which the military uses.

    Until fairly recently, the ARRL suggested one set of phonetics, the military used another set, APCO used another set, and the ICAO used still a 4th. Finally, the ARRL and the US military have "standardized" on the ICAO phonetics. However, there are no regulations in CFR 47, Part 97, that says that you have to use any particular phonetics if you choose to use them.

    Also, on occasion, I have run into DX stations who had great difficulty in pronouncing even the ICAO phonetics. Many of them also had difficulty in understanding them as well. In those cases, it often becomes necessary to use the names of countries, or at least certain geographic areas, when possible to convey the letters of a call sign. Most of them know what letter "America, Britain, Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, etc." start. Only "X" is really hard to come up with a geographic term, and the old "x-ray" gets through on that one.

    I agree that for net operations, most emergency communications, etc., that use of the standardized phonetics is normally the best procedure. However, for casual operation, the use of "cute" phonetics doesn't hurt anything. In fact, some of them are really "funny" and help make contacts more enjoyable.

    I know that there are certain operating practices that "drive me up the wall" (like calling a station on a repeater, and then when they are not answered, saying something like "KZ9XXX clear after negative contact with KZ9XXY" - everyone knows that they didn't come back to you, just go away!). But, I don't let them get my blood pressure up. I just bite my tongue and go on. Life is too short to get upset.

    Glen, K9STH
     
  6. W6TMI

    W6TMI Ham Member QRZ Page

    This thread seems to be turning to pet peeves, so I'll list mine, as the phonetic thing doesnt bother be.
    Personally I would actually prefer people to simply state their callsign, unless there are letters that are hard to differentiate between others.
    Otherwise cute works.

    What I hate is either on a repeater go around with more then 2 people speaking, or on HF when the band may fade anytime, when someone babbles incessantly and doesnt say a whole lot.
    Or even if they do say alot, you may just want to focus to a specific subject and hit the next on the next go around.

    Nothing against ragchewing, or talking about non-important topics, but just make it a little more interactive rather then a monologue.
     
  7. K4LCA

    K4LCA Ham Member QRZ Page

    Glen,

    I'm fairly new to the Ham, ham, HAM, radio service, hobby. I am guilty of, to quote you if I may,

    "I know that there are certain operating practices that "drive me up the wall" (like calling a station on a repeater, and then when they are not answered, saying something like "KZ9XXX clear after negative contact with KZ9XXY" - everyone knows that they didn't come back to you, just go away&#33[​IMG]. But, I don't let them get my blood pressure up. I just bite my tongue and go on. Life is too short to get upset."

    I have done this to let others on the Freq know that I'm done trying, I'm not going to listen for the other station any longer, I'm not going to try to call the other station any more, and the Freq is free should others have been delaying their use until I am clear of my attempted QSO.

    I'll not do this anymore if it upsets people and is wrong.

    Larry K1LCA 'Clear'

    [​IMG]
     
  8. K9KJM

    K9KJM Ham Member QRZ Page

    K9STH has the answer here. There are no "rules"
    that say you need to use the "ICAO" phonetics.
    I spent over 23 years talking to law enforcement
    types using the "APCO" phonetics, and sometimes
    find myself blurting out the "wrong" phonetic.......
    And I have also had the same experience with some
    DX stations who pick out "Kilo Japan Mexico" the first
    time, and could NOT understand "Kilo Juliet Mike".......
    As they say, Life is too short.... Some "cute" phonetics
    bother me also. Turn down the volume of the radio..... [​IMG]
     
  9. VE6DDT

    VE6DDT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Quite very likely, one of the absolute best ways to avoid this topic entirely, is to learn and use """CW""". No talking at all !
    [​IMG]
    Hey ! And if you can't take a joke [​IMG]
     
  10. KB1GYQ

    KB1GYQ Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (VE6DDT @ Aug. 21 2002,09:32)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Quite very likely, one of the absolute best ways to avoid this topic entirely, is to learn and use &quot;&quot;&quot;CW&quot;&quot;&quot;. No talking at all !
    [​IMG]
    Hey ! And if you can't take a joke  [​IMG][/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    I was waiting for that one!

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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