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Our Sun Has Bad Aim with Storms to the East & West | Solar Storm Forecast 09.15.2020

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by KB7TBT, Sep 17, 2020.

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  1. KB7TBT

    KB7TBT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Our Sun Has Bad Aim with Storms to the East & West | Solar Storm Forecast 09.15.2020

     
    AA7OY, KC4D, KJ4EZH and 9 others like this.
  2. K6CLS

    K6CLS Ham Member QRZ Page

  3. AK5B

    AK5B Ham Member QRZ Page

    Welcome back! Not sure which I missed more over the last month---Tamitha's reports or the sunspots. Really need both!

    73,

    Jeff
     
  4. CT1JQC

    CT1JQC Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I now can't live without Dr Tamitha reports... 73
     
    2W0YFC likes this.
  5. VA3DVE

    VA3DVE Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Tamatha and the space weather missed them both as well ........73
     
  6. DJ0AJ

    DJ0AJ Ham Member QRZ Page

    TAMITHA greeting amazing work vy73 DJOAJ ekrem
     
  7. KE4IKY

    KE4IKY Ham Member QRZ Page

    How can we tell if something is to the "east of us" or "west of us" when we're talking about the sun? As the milky way rises, is that to the east?

    Not trying to be a wiseguy.
    I appreciate the effort put into the space weather forecast.

    Thanks
    Joel
     
    KG4BFR likes this.
  8. W5EBB

    W5EBB Ham Member QRZ Page

    For a solar disk image, north is up, south is down, left is east, right is west. This coordinate system is centered in the middle of the solar disk image.

    e.g. a coronal hole on the far east side of the solar disk would launch solar wind particles in a direction perpendicular to the surface of the Sun from that location, which would be along a vector or cone that would pass left of Earth (from a solar system viewpoint).

    You would use a star chart to determine the rise direction and location in the Earth's sky of celestial objects such as the Milky Way.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2020
    KG4BFR likes this.
  9. KE4IKY

    KE4IKY Ham Member QRZ Page

    Ok... Like I said... and in the best humor.... To someone on the sun, what would be east vs west.

    As for looking at the solar disk from afar (what we are doing) wouldn't east be to the right, and west to the left. My reasoning being that if the Earth were viewed as a disk from afar (with North Up). east would be to the right of the image, and west to the left.

    I know references get all loopy in space (at least to me), as a mental exercise a long time ago, I imagined how to keep a spaceship straight and level to the earth when in orbit (automatically, using simple ideas). The level part was pretty easy (the horizons needed to be equal on both "sides" of the spaceship. Keeping it "straight" ( pointed in the same direction as its movement) is a different matter. Of course part of the earth in darkness complicates the leveling part a lot also.

    Thanks
    Joel
     
  10. W5EBB

    W5EBB Ham Member QRZ Page

    I say east would be in the direction where objects "rise" in the morning. For both Sun and Earth, that would be in the direction of diurnal rotation.

    Yes, I agree. However, that's not the convention astronomers have adopted. But it wouldn't be the first time astronomers have got it wrong. They're such a capricious Lot.

    There's a reason why my brain started to hurt trying to figure this out. It turns out the "left is east" convention for a map of the Sun is just that - a convention. There is no visualization or thought experiment that justifies the choice.

    And in fact it's a one-off, an unconventional choice since for maps of individual celestial objects other than the Sun, "left is west."

    https://astronomy.com/magazine/ask-astro/2017/09/directions-in-space

    So it doesn't matter in this case what seems right or wrong, it's the accepted convention that prevails. But have we gained any real knowledge by aquiring an understanding of arbitrary choices? I suppose, if it means we're on on the same page of arbitrariness.
     

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