Okay, I'm nuts -- thinking of learning Morse code now that I'm retired

Discussion in 'Straight Keys - CW Enthusiasts' started by KC5RR, Oct 1, 2019.

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  1. KC5RR

    KC5RR Subscriber QRZ Page

    Has anyone used, or know of a 'quick learn' method called Code Quick?
     
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  2. KA2CZU

    KA2CZU XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    1. you are not nuts
    2. you can learn Morse code through a variety of methods
    3. To your question: no, I haven't. But slow and steady wins the game, in the learning process.
     
    KC5RR likes this.
  3. AG6QR

    AG6QR Subscriber QRZ Page

    You're not nuts. Maybe the best time to learn Morse was decades ago, but the second best time to learn is right now!

    I haven't heard of that particular method, but I know many who have learned the code in or near retirement years. I started learning it in my mid-fifties. Computer aided methods using some variation on Farnsworth spacing and Koch method seem to work well for most.

    Fifteen minutes per day, every day, will do the trick fairly quickly. Hours of study once a week won't work nearly as well.
     
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  4. KE0TNL

    KE0TNL Ham Member QRZ Page

    I don't think you're nuts, I'm 39 and just started teaching myself code like a elementary student learning how to read and write again. I spend 15 minutes everyday either listening to code or practicing with my straight key.

    I have not heard of the 'quick learn' method called Code Quick but there are so many different methods out there now.

    I truly believe that no one should ever stop learning no matter what place in life they are in. From one Army vet/VFW life member to another I hope to hear you out there.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2019
    KC5RR likes this.
  5. KF4MOT

    KF4MOT Ham Member QRZ Page

    I used Code Quick 20ish years ago.
    It's advantage is that it makes it very easy to get up to 5 wpm or so.
    It's disadvantage is that it adds a extra mental step that really slows you down if you want to get any faster than 5 wpm in the future. I'm dealing with this right now.
     
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  6. N8AFT

    N8AFT Subscriber QRZ Page

    I've heard nothing but the same thing, can't get rid of CODE QUICK once you've taught yer brain that crap.
    I'd say get yer code CD's or tapes or old records as well as W1AW!
    Learnin Morse is not all that hard, it's as easy as taking/making time to devote to it!
    THANKS SO MUCH FOR NOT TELLING US YOU PLAN TO LEARN CW!

    Learn Morse.
    Do CW.
    73
     
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  7. W0KDT

    W0KDT XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    KC5RR likes this.
  8. KC7JNJ

    KC7JNJ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Though I did not use it a friend did. Only thing I remember from him using it was “Dog Did It”
     
    KC5RR likes this.
  9. K1LKP

    K1LKP Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    OH MY GOD RANDY,

    I JUST LOOKED AT YOUR QRZ PAGE.

    I SALUTE YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AND SACRIFICE.

    IF TIME ALLOWS, PLEASE STOP BY MY QRZ PAGE
    AND SEE THE SECTION I HAVE DEDICATED TO
    LEARNING MORSE CODE.

    AGAIN, THANK YOU

    73 - K1LKP
     
    KC5RR likes this.
  10. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    CodeQuick is an awful way to learn the code. It requires listening to a letter, thinking of that letter as a phrase, and then writing down or retaining the first or letter of that phrase, or what the phrase reminds you of. What a silly way to learn code. I doubt anyone ever got good at it that way.

    But...it's actually similar to what the U.S. Army used when I visited the Ft. Monmouth code school in about 1970! Of course, soldiers were required to follow instructions and were being paid to be there, and I guess sitting in a code school was better than dodging bullets.:p So, some of them got pretty good after hundreds and hundreds of hours. But it was a very silly way to learn.

    Imagine if you speak to someone on the telephone or in person and you had to go through a 2-step method to understand everything they say: This is fairly common for those learning a new language...hear it in French, translate it to English, then understand it. You can't "listen" at 200 words per minute that way; it's tough to "listen" at even 60 words per minute that way, and that's very slow speech. Fluency requires hearing the language and knowing what it means without having to translate it first.

    I taught some classes at Ft. Monmouth using a totally different procedure, which didn't involve "the L with it" or "dog did it" or any such nonsense. It involved starting right out from scratch with students sending code to each other, and just listening to it. One letter at a time. Then, when they knew the vowels and six consonants, making sentences, simple sentences. No writing anything down, just listening so when you hear a word, you know what it is without actually thinking about each letter.

    Once you can do that, you can always write it down or type it, if you want to. But unless you're handling serious messages, there's no reason to write anything down and in ham radio we are very rarely handling serious messages.:)
     
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