No response to slow CW CQ

Discussion in 'Becoming an Amateur Radio Operator/Upgrading Privi' started by KD0HFZ, Aug 13, 2009.

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  1. KD0HFZ

    KD0HFZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    I have tried slow CW CQ's for WAY too long, ive tried 20 and 40 at all ends of the CW portion. Why am I getting no response?
     
  2. NJ7L

    NJ7L Ham Member QRZ Page

    Post is no longer available.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  3. NS8N

    NS8N Ham Member QRZ Page

    Have you checked your antenna? Seriously, I find CW operators to be very accommodating. Most are so eager to QSO that they would never pass up a CQ. Pick a freq on 20 or 40 meters, I will work you right now.
     
  4. W0IS

    W0IS Ham Member QRZ Page

    Well, there are a number of possible explanations. It's possible that you're not getting out. It's also possible that people are coming back to you, but you're not hearing them for some reason. I think that's what happened when I was starting out, back when dirt was new.

    I would recommend starting out on 40 meters, and then go to 20 meters when you have a few QSO's under your belt. The best frequency to try would be just above 7100. If nobody is there, try somewhere between 7050-7060. I would avoid the lower part of the band for now. However, if you hear someone calling CQ there, it wouldn't hurt to call them back at your speed, and almost everyone will slow down for you.

    When you call CQ, it's best to stick with the "3x3" call:

    CQ CQ CQ DE KD0HFZ KD0HFZ KD0HFZ
    CQ CQ CQ DE KD0HFZ KD0HFZ KD0HFZ
    CQ CQ CQ DE KD0HFZ KD0HFZ KD0HFZ K

    Actually, if you're starting out really slow, two times might actually be better than three. But don't repeat it more than three times, or your customers will get frustrated and look for someone else.


    If you want to try a sked, I'd be happy to give it a try. I'm in Minnesota, so for 40 meters, during the day would be the best time to try it. Unfortunately, I won't be around this weekend, but if you want to try it next week, I'd be happy to give it a try.
     
  5. KD0HFZ

    KD0HFZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    I dont know if it matters, but my ALC meter is pegged when I transmit. I cant do a sked right now, but when i get home from cross country practice and the local radio club meeting we could do a sked.
     
  6. KC7YRA

    KC7YRA Ham Member Volunteer Moderator QRZ Page

    I too noticed this.

    I called and called and CALLED before I got an answer. I have a very low noise floor and a decent antenna. I was perfectly able to make SSB contacts so I am sure people were hearing me. I heard tons of traffic but it was a little to fast for me (little too fast was me being too polite to myself :D)

    Just keep going. I called 10-12 times between QSOs. It seemed to get a little better once I got up to near 10 WPM. I think 5 WPM was scaring folks away. Could also be my choppy sending LOL

    Good luck. Nice ops are out there. They will find you. Keep plugging away. But as others stated, make sure your signal is nice and clean.

    Brad
     
  7. K0RGR

    K0RGR Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I'm not sure if the ALC meter means much on CW - I suspect not, but on some rigs it can indicate issues with SWR. Modern radios generate CW by injecting a tone into the SSB transmitter, so I would expect there might be an ALC reading.

    What about SWR on the antenna?

    What kind of rig are you running and how much power is it putting out?

    Is your antenna a wet noodle at the bottom of an iron rain barrel?

    Are you hearing signals?

    Is the RIT control on? It might be making you listen where you aren't. If there's an XIT control on the rig, make sure that's off, too.

    How are you sending CQ? A 3 X 3 X 3 call is probably overkill, but in any case you should never send a longer one than that. I mean:

    CQ CQ CQ de KD0HFZ KD0HFZ KD0HFZ
    CQ CQ CQ de KD0HFZ KD0HFZ KD0HFZ
    CQ CQ CQ de KD0HFZ KD0HFZ KD0HFZ K

    Note: end with K, not PSE K , not KN, not SK. If you're calling -
    CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ de KD0HFZ KN
    I might not answer you, either. Have you read the section in the ARRL Operating Manual about operating CW?

    Have you tried answering other people's CQ's? Do you know how to get on the other person's frequency? Does your rig have a 'spot' function so you can see where you are in relation to them?

    I agree with the previous opinions, you should focus on 40 as it's an all-night band now, too, and should offer lots of opportunities in the daytime. Saturday morning is also a great time for 40. If the sunspots were more active, we could probably work on 40 in the morning, but we might be a little too close as it is now.
     
  8. W0EA

    W0EA Ham Member QRZ Page

    Don't get too worked up about it Joey, I'll talk to you tonight at the meeting. Try calling CQ while qrp...takes a LOOONG time sometimes! Good thing is you have a keyer and can just let it go for a while without thinking too much about it.

    For what it's worth, if I were you, I'd cut that 160m Vee for 40m and use that, it'd work better that way.

    See you in a couple hours
     
  9. K3STX

    K3STX Ham Member QRZ Page

    What do you call slow CW? I would think a CQ at 10-13 wpm would get a response every time (try between 7050-7125 kc).

    paul
     
  10. KD0HFZ

    KD0HFZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Icom 706MKIIG, 100W 20M dipole is the setup. I heard a russian calling cq, and i answered him and he came back to me but was going too fast for me to copy, so i let him resume the pileup. So at least I know my signal is getting out. Maybe some CW ops just arent patient enough.:confused:
     
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