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New ham: establishing grounding bus bar

Discussion in 'General Technical Questions and Answers' started by W3TKB, Sep 27, 2020.

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  1. N3HGB

    N3HGB Ham Member QRZ Page

    You have the basics, drive the ground rod and string the wire around ;)
     
  2. K1LKP

    K1LKP Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    HELLO KILLER BEE...............

    THE QRZ TROOPS HAVE PROVIDED YOU WITH A LOT OF GREAT SCOOP..... BRAVO........

    THE ONLY THING I WUD LIKE TO ADD ....BASED UPON YOUR STATEMENT:


    would I drill a hole through the concrete floor and pound a grounding rod in downstairs?

    Or take the ground wire outside somehow (there are no windows in the basement)?


    NO MATTER WHERE YOU DECIDE TO PUT THE GROUND ROD,
    MAKE SURE YOU KNOW WHERE ALL OF YOUR UNDERGROUND UTILITY LINES
    ARE LOCATED........... SEWER..... GAS...... ELECTRICTY........ AND WHAT NOT....


    YOU DON'T WANT TO DRILL DOWN THRU THOSE LINES.

    HAVE A LOT OF FB FUN
    IN THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF
    HAM RADIO.

    WORK SAFELY AND PLAN FOR

    MURPHY'S LAW

    73 - K1LKP

    THREE CHEERS FOR THE QUEEN BEE......

    GOD REST HER SOUL ....SHE IS NOW A SILENT KEY.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1999/08/12/technology/morse-code-hams-let-their-fingers-do-the-talking.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2020
  3. WR2E

    WR2E Ham Member QRZ Page

    No, don't do that.
     
  4. KB0MNM

    KB0MNM Ham Member QRZ Page

    What you have said is basically correct, however: 1. If you plan to do it yourself, take advantage of some of the free 'pointers' here on QRZ, and the N.E.C. Code book for 2020. There are a few journeymen electricians who may be able to advise you on techniques. 2. If you plan to hire an electrician, you might first want to decide if you want the wire connected by Cadweld(TM/R/Etc.) ceramic 'shots' by Erico(TM/R/Etc.), or just 'acorn clamps'. The advantages of exothermic welding ( aka 'Cadweld' TM/R/etc. ) are better electrical connections that are less prone to corrosion by virtue of a 'brass blob' under high temperature. If disconnections are anticipated, the clamps work- yet should be tightened from time to time to keep corrosion out of the connection area. The clamps are a bit cheaper, yet safety means that you should consider spending the money sooner rather than later ( like the Fram Oil (TM/R) Commercial- "You can pay me now, or pay me later" ). The idea is that unwanted currents go to ground, instead of to your kids, spouse, or favorite pets ( the goldfish might survive... ). The shields of those coaxial cables are the major concern, which is why I mentioned vendors...
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2020
  5. KB0MNM

    KB0MNM Ham Member QRZ Page

    You read post #2, "Prepare for the deluge..."- just pointing at what was meant- you will note that I selected the 'for free' ground loop reference & code book ( not so cheap... ). He did seem to want to know, after all.
     
  6. N0TZU

    N0TZU Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Interesting. I looked at my 1968 Handbook and it basically reprints part of the NEC Article 810 of the day, with a few comments and explanatory paragraphs. Interestingly there is no discussion about bonding all the rods together in the text or in the part of Article 810 shown. Apparently the code didn't worry about two or more independent rods back then.
     
  7. KB0MNM

    KB0MNM Ham Member QRZ Page

    I think that he said he was going to use a tuner. They do make tuners for VHF & UHF- yet he did not say....
     
  8. W4IOA

    W4IOA Ham Member QRZ Page

    He really didn't give much information for what he thinks or may thinks what he needs. What I think he doesn't need is tying everything to a bus bar and improperly grounding it. Matter of fact, I'm not thinking he needs to go through those steps.
     
  9. W3TKB

    W3TKB XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Again...WOW! Not only a lot of helpful recommendations and suggestions, but also so much speculation on what I have, what I need, what I DON'T need, etc. I'm really not sure how knowing any of that relates back to my original question, which was on how to go about grounding a common ground bus bar (or bonding bar) when located down in the basement. BUT, in order to satisfy the masses: I'm setting up a HF/50 MHz transceiver along with a 30 amp power source, manual antenna tuner, external speaker, and a dipole antenna system. I also live in a "modern" house built circa 1985, so all of my outlets are 3-prong grounded variety, including those down in the basement. Happy?

    I asked the original question about the common ground bus bar because every one of the aforementioned components has a grounding terminal or screw on the back panel. All of my readings up to that point indicated that they all needed to be tied together to a common ground bus bar, that was in turn grounded to a good earth point. If the manufacturer put one there, it's probably for a reason, right? Some respondents to the post indicated that with modern equipment used in a modern grounded-outlet equipped house, the bus bar isn't necessary; apparently some members have never used one with no ill effect. According to the ARRL book "Grounding & Bonding for the Radio Amateur" (yes I bought a copy), use of this common ground bus bar helps to mitigate the chance of any shock hazard from exposed metal enclosures, as well as to aid in the management of RF current, hum, buzz, etc.

    Now that we've established what my original question pertained to and why I asked....I have a follow-up question. Again, referring to the ARRL book, in Chapter 3 it says and I quote: "...connect the bus to the AC safety ground conductor at a power outlet." I read that to mean: I can pull the cover plate off a wall outlet, unscrew and pull the outlet from the box, attach a suitable gauge wire to the grounding point inside the box (or to the ground wire itself), replace everything, and then attach the other end of that wire to my bus bar. No need to sink a grounding rod outside the wall and punch a hole through; no need to run 62 feet of #6 wire around the perimeter of the basement and clamp it to something. Not asking about how or where to ground my antenna or coax. For purposes of grounding JUST the bus bar, does anyone see a problem with how I interpreted what the ARRL book is saying?

    I really don't want to make a mountain out of a mole hill. My philosophy has always been K.I.S.S, and what I described above seems to be the simple solution. If you don't agree and have a good reason why, please...I'd like to hear it. 73 everyone.

    Brando W3TKB
     
  10. W9WQA

    W9WQA Ham Member QRZ Page

    you will find that questions are always questioned here on the "know it all forum"...tons of advice for a yes or no...
     

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