Need some help with new radio

Discussion in 'Youth Forum' started by KG7FLL, Dec 25, 2013.

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  1. N1YWB

    N1YWB Ham Member QRZ Page

    I have had that happen due to RF feedback. It wouldn't happen at low power, but at high power the rig would just shut off. I suspect the RF was getting into the CPU and crashing it. This can happen when the antenna is too close to the rig or when you have high common mode currents on the feedline. In my case I resolved it by moving the antenna farther away.

    What sort of antenna system? How far is the radiator from the rig?

    I've owned several Yaesu mobiles and I've never seen a one shut itself off due to high SWR, even when transmitting with no antenna connected. But I can't say for certain that it never happens.
     
  2. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    If the filter capacitor(s) in your power supply are bad, this will happen. But, I would suspect one of the other possibilities first.
     
  3. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    But I'll bet it didn't turn itself back on.
     
  4. W5BIB

    W5BIB Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Could be a "VOX" thingy as well.....
     
  5. N1YWB

    N1YWB Ham Member QRZ Page

    A sealed beam car headlight makes a fine 12v PSU dummy load. You can even run the high, low, or high & low beams simultaniously to vary the load. A few bucks at wally world. Measure the V out while you do it, shouldn't change more than a few tenths of a volt.
     
  6. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    The FT-2900R doesn't have vox, I don't think.
     
  7. KG7FLL

    KG7FLL Ham Member QRZ Page

    I dont know the power supply brand. The antenna in a dual band 2m 70cm and the coax in RG-58 i believe.
     
  8. W8NGA

    W8NGA Ham Member QRZ Page

    I am thinking that it may be a good possibility that your power supply can not supply enough current when your radio is on high power. I downloaded the manual for your radio and learned that it needs 15 amps on high power so you will need to have a power supply rated at 15 amps or higher. One way you could tell for sure is to borrow a voltmeter and place it across the posts on your power supply. You should read between 13 and 14 volts DC and if my thinking is right, when you transmit on high power, it will the voltage will drop off as your supply cannot supply the needed current. And I bet that the radio operates just fine on the low power settings.

    If your power supply is an Astron (quite common in ham radio shacks) then its model number is the key to the current rating. For example, I have 3 of them, RS-3 (good for 3 amps), RS-12A (12 amps) and a RS-35M (35 amps) that I use for my 100 watt low band radio. However, the current rating should be marked on it somewhere.

    I hope that this makes sense! Please let us know what you find with your power supply. Do you know of another ham operator or club near you as perhaps someone there could help? Otherwise, I am willing to help you out as much as I can through email, etc . But I must admit that I don't check this forum as often as I should.

    Good luck,
    Greg W8NGA
     
  9. KG7FLL

    KG7FLL Ham Member QRZ Page

    last time i checked my fuses they were good but i might check them often now
     
  10. KG7FLL

    KG7FLL Ham Member QRZ Page

    Alright. I will look into a 15 amd power supply. the one i was running was 12.5 so i might have to get a new one so i dont have to use a car battery.
     
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