My Subaru Forester Low Impact Installation

Discussion in 'Mobile Radio Systems' started by KN3O, Feb 19, 2016.

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  1. K0BG

    K0BG Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    That little "black box" attached to the negative lead, is indeed the LCD. If you wire your negative lead to the bolt at the left of the black box, you will be fine.
     
  2. AG6JU

    AG6JU Ham Member QRZ Page

    this is 2014 Base Model Forester.
    Battery connection is PLUS to Positive, MINUS to Body Ground near battery.
    FT-7900R, main unit in under passenger side seat.
    also APRS radio in under seat.
    2 antenna on Hood using hatch back style mount.
    Antenna, DC cable wire go through Air Condition out side air intake.
    Subaru is easy to take them parts compare to other manufactures.
    I like the sound of BOXER engine, it sort of sound like old Volkswagen or 4 cylinder Porsche.
    EMI wise car is pretty clean, even at 27 MHz CB frequency.
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  3. WB3X

    WB3X Ham Member QRZ Page

    This whole thread is helpful to me (2016 Forester) as I begin considering what I can really do for an installation.
     
  4. KN3O

    KN3O Ham Member QRZ Page

    If you need any help feel free to PM me or email and I'll get you model numbers on the equipment or get you some pictures.
     
  5. AG6JU

    AG6JU Ham Member QRZ Page

    I took more picture of Forester radio wire.

    if I were to do same installation again, I might put Main Unit of Radio inside of Tupperware and place in engine room, and bring only Control Cable and speaker wire to Head unit. It may be easier to run just control cable and speaker wire through rather than much thicker Coax and DC cable

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    Antenna Coax and DC power into inside of car.
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  6. KD2IAT

    KD2IAT Ham Member QRZ Page

    As a former professional upfitter of vehicles for police, fire, and EMS use as well as a first responder who actually uses said radios under real emergency conditions, I think this is a very, very bad idea. Tupperware melts at fairly low temps, and the radio would be subject to added sources of RFI by being proximate to the alternator, BCM, PCM, etc. The vehicle's steel firewall is a pretty decent barrier to some RFI. Plus there's always other elements like water to consider. Engine heat alone is plenty of reason to locate the radio elsewhere.

    Standard practice among the pros that install hundreds of units each year is to place the main unit of the radio in a location that protected from the elements and temperature extremes. In most vehicles, that's the passenger compartment or the trunk. An under seat mounting is popular because it's also protected from being kicked and it's easy to access for installation and maintenance. It's also a great place for routing wires and such to various locations in the vehicle. There's almost always cuts in carpeting for wiring to the seats and you can get to the vehicle's wiring paths in just a few inches. The new Durangos and Grand Cherokees have nice sub-floor compartments under the driver's seat. Since the batteries in those vehicles are in an identical compartment under the front passenger seat, it's pretty much a perfect solution to installation, especially given the proximity to the center console area when it's usually most desirable to place the control head and mic. Other vehicles have the battery in the trunk giving similar opportunities for smart locations of the radio and other electronics. With the widespread use of the AGM sealed batteries, they're being located elsewhere in vehicles to provide additional space in the engine compartment for emission controls, computers, air conditioning etc.

    Coax in upfitter and radio shop installs usually comes down one of the pillars (B or C preferred) to the floor and on to the radio. I am not a fan of antennas bracketed to a front fender or trunk lip mounted to the hood so I always drill the hole(s) in the roof. Keeping coax out of and away from the engine compartment is just one more way to keep RFI issues to a minimum
     
  7. KD2IAT

    KD2IAT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Am I seeing hot glue being used to fasten things here and there under the hood? If that's case, two things to consider: First, hot glue is water soluble. It does get wet under there, more that we think. Second, hot glue melts at fairly low temps, lower than tupperware.
     
  8. K0BG

    K0BG Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Steve, I'm not surprised at anything anymore. I guess I'll have to bypass my better judgement, and post a few dozen more installations in my Gallery's Hall Of Shame!
     
  9. NP2GG

    NP2GG Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Just installed a mobile radio in my 2005 WRX.

    10 gauge red and black zip cord through a spare unused firewall grommet behind the pedals directly to the battery terminals, with in-line fuses on each lead. Terminated in ARES power pole configuration at the radio which is mounted on the right (passenger) side of the center console. Easy to take out for desktop use in the house. No RFI at all.

    This is how it's supposed to be done; properly fused and without any connections to the chassis.
     
  10. KD2IAT

    KD2IAT Ham Member QRZ Page

    We've had this debate before, let's not be getting each other's shoes wet again. Some manufacturer's call for the ground lead to the battery, some with and some without the ground side fusing. Most commercial radios call for chassis ground at a factory bonding point, and without fusing on the ground side.

    Rather than state an absolute, let's just agree that following the radio manufacturer's instructions and the vehicle manufacturer's instructions is the correct way for any specific install. With all the onboard computers and monitoring systems in today's cars and light trucks, there's no "one way fits all" any more.

    As a pro upfitter in a previous life, I check the upfitter's guide for the vehicle I am working on first, and then the radio install guide for the specific radio at hand. If there's no upfitter's guide, I can usually find a factory manual with specifics for two way radio installs
     

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