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My Storm Chase/SkyWarn Spotting Vehicle: Video

Discussion in 'On the Road' started by KC0IVL, Apr 2, 2016.

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  1. KG4ERE

    KG4ERE XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    "I would have liked to be a Meteorologist but I'm mathematically challenged so that didn't work out."

    Not just mathematically
     
  2. N0TZU

    N0TZU Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    I don't think this programming limitation applies. Part 90 governs land mobile licensees, not those of the amateur service, which is part 97. The scope set out in 90.401 limits subpart N to stations licensed under part 90.

    As far as I know, there is no prohibition against programming a radio to any frequency in part 97. Of course, transmitting on any frequency is quite another matter!
     
    KC9UDX and (deleted member) like this.
  3. AG6QR

    AG6QR Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Part 97 only governs the Amateur Radio Service. As soon as you leave authorized Amateur Service frequencies, you are outside the limits of Part 97, and you must abide by the regulations that govern the frequencies you're talking about.

    If you have an unmodified VHF/UHF Amateur Radio, it's only acting as a receiver outside of the Amateur frequencies, so it's perfectly legal to program any frequency into it.
     
    KD2IAT likes this.
  4. N0IU

    N0IU Ham Member QRZ Page

    But in his video (starting at about 2:43) he said, (emphasis added by me) "Our next radio over is a dual band 2 meter 440 ham radio. Its an Icom 208H and it is MARS/CAP modified so I can also TALK on the FRS and GMRS bands."
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
  5. N0TZU

    N0TZU Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    I don't think it matters if it's only receiving. I see nothing in Part 97 that prohibits an amateur from programming, modifying (or building) a radio capable of transmissions outside the ham bands.

    It is transmitting outside the bands which is prohibited, except for special licenses or bona fide emergencies.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. AG6QR

    AG6QR Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I think I'd phrase it that an Amateur licensee doesn't have any more or less rights outside the ham bands than someone who lacks an Amateur license. The Amateur license doesn't grant you any rights to build or operate transmitters for outside the ham bands, but the license doesn't take away any rights, either.

    The only frequencies where an Amateur License grants you any privileges above and beyond what a non-licensed individual has are those frequency ranges listed in 97.301. Do you see anything to the contrary in Part 97?
     
  7. KC0IVL

    KC0IVL Ham Member QRZ Page

    Since I bought the truck I've been to Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, South Dakota, Nebraska, Colorado, North Dakota, Illinois, and I've had the truck set up as is since 2005, and I've NEVER been pulled over in it. This year I plan on visiting Missouri in July.
     
  8. KC0IVL

    KC0IVL Ham Member QRZ Page

    I made the video before I ever knew about these Forums. I didn't post it on here to brag, show off, or start a a big debate. My sole purpose of making the video and posting it all around (I've got it on a lot of boards) is for the sole purpose of getting hits (and maybe a few more subscribers) on my YouTube Channel. It seems to be working. :)
     
  9. N1EN

    N1EN Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    The only prohibition would seem to be the blanket prohibition against receiving certain cellular signals.

    Folks confused by the Part 90/95 restrictions on what frequencies are programmed into radios might be helped by remembering that the FCC and NTIA generally require transceivers in the hands of most users to be idiot-proofed. Hams get the special privilege of not locking down their transceivers and the luxury of VFOs due to the special nature of amateur radio.
     
  10. N0TZU

    N0TZU Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Building and operating are two very different things. Is there an FCC regulation which says that no one can build or possess a radio transmitter unless licensed for a service that the transmitter covers?
     

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