Mobile antenna for icom 7300

Discussion in 'On the Road' started by KK4VGT, Nov 8, 2019.

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  1. KK4VGT

    KK4VGT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Your opinion on what to use in my rv antenna wise for a icom 7300. Price not a concern but then not the moon. Thanks KK4VGT.
     
  2. KU3X

    KU3X Ham Member QRZ Page

    When you say mobile antenna, I have to assume you mean attached to the vehicle so you can use it as you drive? If so, to keep the cost down, the Hustler HF antennas are very efficient when it comes to 10 through 20 meters. They are also not too bad on 40. To increase efficiency, for 10 through 40 meters, get the KW coils.

    http://www.ku3x.net/hf-mobile


    Barry, KU3X
     
  3. WW2PT

    WW2PT Ham Member QRZ Page

    KH6AQ likes this.
  4. WG9K

    WG9K XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    I love my wolf river coil on my pick up truck and also use it as a portable antenna de WG9K
     
  5. K0UO

    K0UO Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    20191123_210234.jpg 20191123_210254.jpg 20191123_210321.jpg
    You want the best, A number of RVers use the best mobile antenna The Scorpion.
    Ron makes a version of it with two back-to-back that at least 15 rvers I know are currently using them, we swear it's the best mobile antenna ever.mout on the ladder
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2019
  6. W6QW

    W6QW Ham Member QRZ Page

    I use the Icom AH4 automatic tuner tied to an IC7300 and a 30 ft push-up mast with a wire. My motor home chassis is the counterpoise. Works very well and no manual tuning is required. If you want to QSO while in motion, lower the fiberglass mast but I have never tried it.
     
    K0UO likes this.
  7. N3UML

    N3UML Ham Member QRZ Page

    I recently purchased a diamond screwdriver antenna with a target tuner to use with my icom 706 mk II and it works very well on 20 40 80. i recently worked spain on 75 meters which i never dreamed would ever happen and only running 80 watts. im gonna try adding a sys s300 amplifier to give it a little extra power how ever in doing so you must be very careful and make sure you input the lowest setting of power into the amp as the antenna only is rated at 200 watts peak output of amp is rated 300 so 5 watts in should keep in in the numbers happy dxing allan N3UML
     
  8. KC8QVO

    KC8QVO Ham Member QRZ Page

    I use Tarheel screwdrivers. My personal truck has 2 - a Model 400 with a 102" whip on it for 17-160m (it is too long to get to 15-10m) and a Little Tarheel II for the high bands (I have 4 whips for it - the original short one, the "long" optional one, a 6ft from the full size screwdrivers, and a 102"). I generally keep the short whip on the Little Tarheel II and can run it down to 6m while "mobile".

    Of all the antennas, if you have one to pick from, and you want a "mobile" antenna (one that can be in operation going down the road, not just while stopped) I would say a Tarheel Model 400 is a good option. I would use quick disconnects on the whips and use the stock 6ft for all band use and get a 102" for better efficiency for the low bands; or replace the 102" as an option with an egg beater halo/capacitance hat. The more "whip" you have up top (whether that is all whip or a capcitance hat of some kind) the better the efficiency is going to be and on 75/80-160m this REALLY helps. Even though there is plenty of coil on the Model 400 to get down to the bottom of 160m with the stock whip the less coil you can use the more efficient the antenna will be, just at the expense of higher frequency coverage. That's where the 2 screwdrivers I run come in handy - but truthfully I am rarely on the high bands anyway (mostly on 75m if I am running HF mobile).

    All of the above having been said, if you want an antenna to use with the radio in the RV while stopped - you don't have much limitation. I drove over the road in a semi for a while and my favorite antenna was a 1/4 wave wire on 40m or so (around 35-40ft I think) thrown in a tree, fed with a tuner, and that used the trailer as a counterpoise.

    I also had 35' of mast sections (aluminum military tent poles) that I could set up as a temporary support if I didn't have trees. I was out west for a while and I liked stopping at the road side rest spots (like a rest stop, but more of just a blocked off lane adjacent to the travel lanes where trucks were allowed to park) for my nights if there was one conveniently located on my route and that fit with my clock schedule. I used ratchet straps to secure the mast to one of the rear-most drive tires and the front side of the trailer (flatbed with a rub rail). Then I ran the wire from the top of the mast to the rear of the trailer as a sloper. The tuner was at the feed point in the back with a pair of vice grips holding a ground wire to the side of the trailer. It worked great!

    I suspect you can mimic the wire antenna idea most inexpensively of the options - just need an auto tuner that you can remote (note this is a loose term - I used an LDG Z11pro - it is not an "outside" tuner, but in a storage tub with a snap on lid it can be used as one - I do that with the LDG AT-200pro at home just as well as the Z11pro).

    If you have the room to do it - a doublet set up as an inverted V off the same mast idea works wonders. You may need to play around with baluns (having a 1:1 and 4:1 might be nice options) to feed the balanced line, but that would be a good multi-band antenna that is easy to set up.

    For a no-tuner-required antenna while stopped you may shoot for a multi-band fan dipole. You can run 3 bands off a fan dipole fairly easily.

    You can also make a full-size dipole with jumpers in between sections to give a full size dipole on every band. I have a version of this I made out of 26 gauge Silky wire from The Wireman. It is my favorite camping/backpacking antenna. I had sections out to 75/80m but it got eaten by a lawn mower so I need to rebuild it.

    Hope this gives you some ideas. Get on the air with something and keep on experimenting. Have fun with it! That is one of my favorite things with Ham radio - put something up and try it. If it doesn't work - change it. If it works - great. Use it. Then try something else!
     

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