Learning CW, it just doesnt stick!

Discussion in 'Straight Keys - CW Enthusiasts' started by SA7CNG, May 21, 2020.

ad: L-HROutlet
ad: l-rl
ad: L-Geochron
ad: Left-3
ad: HRDLLC-2
ad: MessiPaoloni-1
ad: Left-2
ad: L-MFJ
ad: abrind-2
  1. WA9FZB

    WA9FZB XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Oh, and one more thing. . . give yourself time. This (learning Morse Code) is like learning a foreign language. As we get older (we're not old yet, are we?), new languages are one of the hardest skills to learn. Don't beat yourself up. Make this a personal challenge, but the goal is to learn code, not necessarily in any specific length of time. Once you learn it, you'll have it for life.

    I'm another of those hams who have been licensed for a long time (57 years for me), but who were off the air for an interval (19 years for me). Once I fired up the rig after that long dry stretch, it only took me a week or less to get back up to speed.

    Learning Morse Code is work, but for those of us who use it all the time, it is well worth the effort. You will be a welcome addition to the group.
     
  2. K1LKP

    K1LKP Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    HI ALEX,

    THREE CHEERS FOR ALL OF YOUR QRZ FRIENDS.....

    THEY HAVE PROVIDED YOU WITH A LOT OF GOOD INFO.

    FIRST OF ALL LET ME SAY THANK YOU FOR BEING HONEST
    WITH YOUR INITIAL POSTING AND LETTING US KNOW
    ABOUT YOUR DIFFICULTIES LEARNING LANGUAGES
    AND ALSO ABOUT BEING COMPLETELY TONE DEAF.

    I CAN ONLY ADD A FEW GRAPHICS THAT MIGHT
    HELP YOU GET OVER SOME OF THE HURDLES
    IN LEARNING MORSE CODE.

    dont worry be happy .jpg
    positive_attitude.jpg
    _CALM_AND_TAP_OUT_MORSE_CODE_NEW.jpg

    ALEX, HAVE YOU TRIED TO LEARN HOW TO
    SEND MORSE CODE USING A VERY BASIC
    STRAIGHT KEY.????? PLEASE LET US KNOW.



    CHECK OUT THIS SITE FOR SOME ENCOURAGING
    INFORMATION ON LEARNING A NEW SKILL.


    https://daringtolivefully.com/how-to-learn-any-skill-faster

    BE SURE TO READ ALL OF THE SUGGESTIONS / TIPS PROVIDED IN THE
    ABOVE SITE.

    HOPE TO HEAR BACK FROM YOU, SO THAT WE CAN
    ALL HELP YOU OUT

    good_luck_comment_015.gif

    THREE_CHEERS_FOR_morse_code.jpg

    73 AND HAVE A HAPPY WEEKEND






     
    Last edited: May 22, 2020
    NK8I likes this.
  3. KD4ZFS

    KD4ZFS Ham Member QRZ Page

    god kväll!

    And welcome to CW!

    Try learning the sound of the letters like you learn your favorite songs. You hear the song, you know what it is. Do the same with CW!

    Memorize nothing, just learn to hear. (OK, you will memorize things - just try to focus on listening!)

    Patience! Just keep going! These things take time. You are doing well! :)
     
  4. M6GYU

    M6GYU Ham Member QRZ Page

    How long and how often do you practice? Once a day for five minutes? Twice a day for an hour?

    Once a day for five minutes is just a wast of time.
     
    W9RAC likes this.
  5. SA7CNG

    SA7CNG Ham Member QRZ Page

    Thanx for all the support! I will try to get a steady routine in place, training for example 30min per day. I havent tried sending anything yet, i havent got a key for my transmitter.

    I remember that during conscription they put you through a bunch of different tests, and amongst them was a simple telegraphy test. It was a short test, with just a few letters(if i remember correctly). The test was probably for sorting out the people what would be able to learn CW with the least amount of training, in order to spare military expenses.

    There are several sources that recomends not going below 15wpm in character speed, because its not going to program your brain to connect the "sound to the character", but the Technician class requirement is only 5 wpm. Is it a total waste of time to try learning at a lower speed?
     
    KD4ZFS and K1LKP like this.
  6. K5TSK

    K5TSK Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Maybe, eat more fish??? Salmon's good. tuna, ok, but watch the mercury.
     
    K1LKP likes this.
  7. AG6QR

    AG6QR Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    It's not necessarily a total waste of time. Many of today's hams started by passing a 5wpm test to get a Novice test, and then building speed. But...

    There is no 5wpm license test these days. There is not so much slow code on the air now.

    Going at 15wpm is very different from going at 5wpm. To transition from one to the other will likely take nearly as much time as learning at 15wpm.

    If your goal is to get on the air at 15wpm, the quickest route to that end is probably to learn the sounds of the letters at around 15wpm. But that's not the only worthy goal. Some people want to get on the air ASAP, and if that's the goal, 5wpm may get you started faster, even if you have a harder time finding stations on the air that you can copy, and even if it takes a long time to get to 15wpm.

    But generally, for most people these days, I'd agree with the conventional wisdom of learning the sounds of the letters at around 15wpm from the start.
     
    KK6BNF and KD4ZFS like this.
  8. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    There is no longer a Morse proficiency requirement for Technician or any other class license, in a long time. A few countries still do impose it to achieve HF operating privileges, but not many and certainly nowhere in the U.S. or Europe.

    IMO, 5 wpm is a bit "painful" because the dits and dahs are so widely spaced it's easy to lose focus and never really hear the rhythmic patterns required to use the code at practical speeds -- however, lots of us were Novice (licensees) once and actually did have QSOs at 5 wpm! I was a kid, but remember that being pretty painful.

    15 wpm does seem a more practical learning speed, but to slow down the average rate, leave longer pauses between words. The English language uses only a few hundred words to communicate most thoughts and hearing those become so familiar that code operators don't even think about them; we tend to focus on the "variables," like someone's name, QTH and other things not very predictable.

    Get a key and practice sending. I believe that almost always helps to learn with "copying" the code. A transmitter isn't required, just an oscillator that creates an audible tone when the key's closed is enough, and what most used back in the old days. Besides, sending is very different from receiving. I recently worked a YL operator on CW who was sending pretty slowly but advised "I can copy any speed" so I wondered if whe was using a computer to decode. I started sending at about 35 wpm and it was evident she was copying that just fine, but she was still sending slowly (but well).

    Then she told me she spent years in the military as a code interceptor which involves copying code at high speeds but never involved any sending. So, after all these years, she's just starting to "send," now, and was only recently licensed. Cool story, but does demonstrate these are different talents.

    Keep it up, it will all work.
     
    KD4ZFS and 2E0OZI like this.
  9. SA7CNG

    SA7CNG Ham Member QRZ Page

    I have spent some time today with https://lcwo.net and actually achieving some succsess! What seams to work is a character speed of 15wpm and a "real" speed of 5wpm. After spending about 2 hours i can copy about 95% of the 5.th lesson(7 letters in total). This speed is the breakingpoint however, at a real speed of 7wpm it all crashes.

    I looked at the MFJ-550 straight CW-key, would that be a good buy for someone starting with CW?
     
    WB5YUZ, KD4ZFS, M6GYU and 1 other person like this.
  10. K1SZO

    K1SZO XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    All my hobbies are cyclical. (can't seem to focus on one hobby all year long) So even when I do start picking up cw. My attention wane after a while and I then suffer from the use it or lose problem.

    I even invested in a nice Vibroplex Vibrokeyer Deluxe which I'm extremely happy with. It doesn't feel like I will ever become proficient with it. Only practicing a bit when my interest returns and for however many months I'm active each year.
     

Share This Page