KF4BWG Horse Fence antenna.

Discussion in 'Antennas, Feedlines, Towers & Rotors' started by WM5TS, Feb 16, 2016.

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  1. WM5TS

    WM5TS XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Has anyone used the Horse Fence antenna with a tuner? Namely a built in tuner in the TS 570, or any tuner for that matter.

    73
     
  2. KO6WB

    KO6WB Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I used the tuner in my TS-590S to tune a 14 ft. aluminum ladder on all bands between 40-6.
    Dang thing worked, not sure how well but it made contacts.
    Most horse fencing is fairly low to the ground, unless it's for a stallion, and makes for a different manner of operation.
    Will it work? Probably, but can't tell how well it'll do. You'll make some contacts I'm certain. Just takes time and good propagation.
    Checked the web site for KF4BGW and the only reference to a horse fence is the stuff to make the antenna with. Any conductor will work just as well and can be just as portable.
    A lot of the performance is going to vary with the height above ground and other such known factors in antennas. These factors have been known for decades, so there's no mystery involved.
    You can easily make your own copy of what really is a simple dipole by referring to the numerous references on the web and at your local library.
    Some reading material is present for your viewing pleasure.
    http://www.hamuniverse.com/n4jaantennabook.html

    http://zerobeat.net/r3403c.pdf

    http://www.apparentlyapparel.com/up...ical_antenna_handbook_fourth_edition_carr.pdf

    Hope this helps
    73
    Gary
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2016
    WM5TS likes this.
  3. AA7QQ

    AA7QQ Ham Member QRZ Page

    I had a run of 450' of siamesed RG6 quad shield, used as a balanced feedline going to 1800' of copperclad steel horse fence. Worked great with a real tuner. I seriously doubt that your built in tuner can handle it well. I also had #30 ground & high cliffs reflecting me eastward. 160-6 meters all worked fine.

    Ed
     
  4. WB8NQW

    WB8NQW Ham Member QRZ Page

    I do not know what a horse fence is. At Field Day our club fed a typical farm fence - wires in 7" squares - stapled to wood posts - about 260' long - using an external tuner. A 4' ground stake driven somewhere near the center of the 260' length with the center conductor of the coax fastened to the bottom wire with vise-grips and shield to the ground rod. Worked stations on several bands all over the USA and Canada. We have also used a 40' aluminum extension ladder extended about 32' and rope guyed to hold it upright using the same ground rod and vise-grips. Both good for several chuckles.
     
  5. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    I'd ask the horse.

    He'll give you the answer that you'll endorse.

    [​IMG]
     
    NH7RO and WB5YUZ like this.
  6. KQ0J

    KQ0J XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    I think he is referring to the antenna that is made out of the flat 'tape ' style horse fencing material, not loading up your
    fencing ( or I might try that ! ). That tape is varying widths of woven plastic with many thin wires all along it to carry the
    electric fencer output. I have used that tape for many horse enclosures and given my experience with its lack of durability
    when it has tension on it and it is exposed to flexing in the wind, I would be hesitant to try it for anything but a temporary
    antenna.

    http://kf4bwg.com/
     
  7. KF4ZGZ

    KF4ZGZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Use wire. It's a know product that works. I imagine that the horse fence antenna would pretty much work as any other dipole, but for the life of me, I can't figure out why you would use it.
    Mechanical, problems, wind loading, high visibility are just the first things that come to mind as to why NOT to use it.


    Matt
     
  8. K4SAV

    K4SAV Ham Member QRZ Page

    This stuff comes with either copper, aluminum, or stainless steel wires and may be round or in a flat tape form. The wires are very small and subject to breaking if the wire is not well supported. Long unsupported runs will flap around in the wind a lot.

    Conductivity is poor compared to most wire used for antennas. I would expect the velocity factor to change as the rope or tape absorbs water, and that will cause the resonant frequency of the antenna to change.

    You will need the proper connectors to be able to connect to this. I can't see any advantage to using this for an antenna.

    Jerry, K4SAV
     
  9. NH7RO

    NH7RO Ham Member QRZ Page

    I consulted with Mr. Ed about this and he said they're good for occasionally horsing around on HF, noting that they are nothing all that special in the long run.
     
    K0UO likes this.
  10. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    But don't tell me you looked a gift horse in the mouth.
     

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