Is Packet Radio Dead?

Discussion in 'Working Different Modes' started by K0LTZ, Dec 11, 2019.

?

Is packet radio dead?

  1. Yes

    38.3%
  2. No

    61.7%
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  1. K0LTZ

    K0LTZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Looking to explore digital modes, starting with packet. Then I started looking at TNC's. I thought people used to give em away? They seem expensive. Wondering if it is worth getting one or a waste of money. And does it matter what speeds?
     
  2. KI6J

    KI6J Ham Member QRZ Page

    Sound card packet.
    Far from dead.
     
    KF5RHI likes this.
  3. KA0HCP

    KA0HCP XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Joke-of-the-day, recipes and the Internet killed Packet twenty-five years ago. The digipeaters, backbones and nationwide networks are long gone.

    Now, there are some specialized applications using the same equipment like APRS, Winlink, etc. that many enjoy.
     
  4. K8BZ

    K8BZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Packet Radio is Dead??
    Somebody forgot to tell me and these guys:

    C K8BZ-1
    cmd:*** CONNECTED to K8BZ-1 [12/12/19 21:03:06]
    [KAMP-8.0-HM$]
    76877 BYTES AVAILABLE
    THERE ARE 48 MESSAGES NUMBERED 2-53
    K8BZ Mailbox in Gladwin, MI EN-73-sx
    ENTER COMMAND: B,J,K,L,R,S, or Help >
    L
    MSG# ST SIZE TO FROM DATE SUBJECT
    53 PF 969 W8RDG K8BZ 12/10/19 13:36:05 Sats
    52 PY 278 K8BZ W8RDG 12/10/19 11:00:59 Bugtussle to Bugtussle West!
    51 PF 503 W8RDG K8BZ 12/09/19 18:18:42 HT's on packet
    50 PY 243 K8BZ W8RDG 12/09/19 11:49:18 Re:160m contest
    49 PY 243 K8BZ W8RDG 12/09/19 11:48:41 Re:160m contest
    48 PY 814 K8BZ WA5ETK 12/08/19 16:20:16 December 7, 1941... Uh, I mean
    47 PY 291 K8BZ WA5ETK 12/08/19 13:15:37 Hi Steve! (direct antenna-to-a
    46 PF 163 W8RDG K8BZ 12/07/19 11:14:57 160m contest
    45 PY 147 K8BZ W8RDG 12/07/19 10:11:31 Have Fun!
    44 PF 240 W8RDG K8BZ 12/06/19 14:34:34 Checkers
    43 PY 288 K8BZ W8RDG 12/06/19 14:33:00 Checkers
    42 PF 644 W8GDW K8BZ 12/04/19 12:03:59 MITN etc.
    41 PF 586 W6OAV K8BZ 12/04/19 12:00:58 Re: GM
    40 PY 342 K8BZ W6OAV 12/04/19 11:07:25 GM
    39 PY 620 K8BZ W8RDG 12/03/19 16:11:51 RK3PKP
    38 PF 547 W8RDG K8BZ 12/03/19 15:44:18 RK3KPK
    37 PY 467 K8BZ W8RDG 12/03/19 15:42:31 Message on my BBS
    36 PY 623 K8BZ W8RDG 12/03/19 15:41:34 Re:MITN
    35 PY 623 K8BZ W8RDG 12/03/19 15:40:19 Re:MITN
    34 PY 237 K8BZ W8RDG 12/01/19 13:52:28 Wow it's fast!
    33 PY 334 K8BZ W8RDG 12/01/19 13:49:35 Re:QSL 3 Msgs
    32 PY 487 K8BZ VA3HRA 12/01/19 13:09:12 Mixed bag of weather
    31 PY 376 K8BZ W8RDG 12/01/19 11:43:11 Re:Sat Morning
    30 PY 255 K8BZ W8RDG 12/01/19 10:53:59 Re:Sat Morning
    29 PY 238 K8BZ W8RDG 12/01/19 10:53:26 Re:nets
    28 PY 179 K8BZ W8RDG 12/01/19 10:53:05 QMN
    27 PY 169 K8BZ W8RDG 11/29/19 09:41:26 From KE0GB’s system
    26 PF 549 KE0GB K8BZ 11/28/19 15:29:18 RE: INFO
    25 PY 359 K8BZ KE0GB 11/28/19 13:31:23 RE: INFO
    24 PF 230 KE0GB K8BZ 11/28/19 12:50:14 RE: INFO
    23 PY 103 K8BZ W6OAV 11/28/19 11:04:37 Greetings
    22 PY 416 K8BZ KE0GB 11/28/19 10:38:43 Re:INFO
    21 PY 1268 K8BZ KE0GB 11/27/19 12:35:37 Re:W8RDG
    20 PY 384 K8BZ W8RDG 11/27/19 09:49:17 Thanks
    19 PY 262 K8BZ W8RDG 11/26/19 15:01:18 Greetings via KE0GB
    18 PY 234 K8BZ W8RDG 11/26/19 14:15:29 HAPPY THANKSGIVING
    17 PY 365 K8BZ W6OAV 11/26/19 11:45:33 GM
    14 PY 300 K8BZ W6OAV 11/24/19 16:45:49 Greetings
    13 PY 637 K8BZ KE0GB 11/24/19 15:06:11 Route to you
    12 PY 520 K8BZ KB9PVH 11/21/19 09:52:20 Fixing Stuff
    11 PY 736 K8BZ AC0VC 11/21/19 09:45:33 Rod Building
    8 PY 494 K8BZ W6OAV 11/19/19 12:11:32 Greetings
    7 PY 441 K8BZ AC0VC 11/19/19 10:01:17 Re:Fly Rod
    6 PY 432 K8BZ WA5ETK 11/18/19 11:19:32 Hi Steve!
    5 PY 811 K8BZ AC0VC 11/18/19 11:18:10 Re:Fly Rod
    4 PY 963 K8BZ KQ0I 11/16/19 13:02:37 Saturday noon
    3 PY 395 K8BZ AC0VC 11/16/19 12:34:09 GM
    2 B 1022 ALL K8BZ 11/14/19 20:08:08 This Station
    ENTER COMMAND: B,J,K,L,R,S, or Help >

    Depending on where you live VHF packet may be pretty scarce. Although in some metro areas it's quite active. HF packet is still very much alive. Especially on 20 meters, 14.105 Mhz. Still lots of TNC based packet there. New TNC are quite expensive, but you can get them used sometimes for very reasonable prices.

    Good luck.
     
    KG5OFB likes this.
  5. K2CQW

    K2CQW Ham Member QRZ Page

    UZ7HO Soundmodem & Signalink. Works with my Yaesu FTM400XDR
     
    KF5RHI and WD4ELG like this.
  6. K6CLS

    K6CLS Ham Member QRZ Page

    Santa Clara county ER uses packet onb2m, and 9600 band on 220MHz.
     
  7. KU7PDX

    KU7PDX Ham Member QRZ Page

  8. W4EAE

    W4EAE Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Is the market for hardware modems dying? Probably.

    The simple fact is that a hardware modem is no longer required.

    I have an FM packet station running on a Raspberry Pi Zero W. I made the cables, but total investment is less than $20 for the whole deal (less the radio). If you paid someone to make the cables, you would still be in the $50 range for whole setup. If you set it up with a newer radio that has a USB audio I/O, then all you need is USB cable that you already have lying around. Total investment then would be $10.

    This sure the beats the $200 Signalink and $250 Kantronics modem setup of 20 years ago.
     
    KI6J likes this.
  9. VE3CGA

    VE3CGA XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    I've got a question about the routes displayed through uiss and soundmodem
    I see paths like
    1:Fm VE3CGA To APRS Via VE3TEJ*,WIDE2* <UI C Pid=F0 Len=31> [10:59:51R] [-+-]
    =4259.46N/08104.96W-ve3cga :)

    but quite often theres something different after the "TO" such as APxxxx or or starting with "Txxxxx" are these some other router like wide1 or 2?

    on APRS direct clicking on the map I see this "qas" example APRS via WIDE2-1,qAS,callsign what on earth is the qas in the route info?

    also in some info I see "TCPIP* " where is this routed to ??

    is there a listing as to what these mean on line??

    tnx Bob VE3CGA
     
  10. KB0MNM

    KB0MNM Ham Member QRZ Page

    See if this makes sense: http://14567.org/ for your area. TNCs are basically AX.25 protocol converters with audio outputs and inputs for your radio. While it is possible to use many programs which put the HDLC ordinarilly held as firmware in a TNC into software on your PC, there are still a few reasons to use a dedicated TNC instead: 1. Use with an older PC or terminal that has RS-232 rather than USB ports. 2. Storage of messages ( some have included storage of messages, usually those for your specific callsign ). This is typically less a concern as PCs generally have plenty of non-volatile storage. 3. Indications of working connection- discrete LEDs for transmit and receive can not only be good diagnostics, but also good ways to attract others to digital modes in field-day and hamfest settings. 4. Most important: resources- your PC uses far less processing time if the terminal ( keyboard to digital ) operation is all that is required. Running an HDLC stack for AX.25 and possibly maps for APRS takes away from time that the CPU is available for other tasks, such as lookups and logging. Many HF ops use AX25 'beacons-networks' to determine which frequencies are 'open' for distance. A separate TNC and second PC mean that the primary one can be used for web-browsing, work, etcetera and the log examined on the dedicated machine when the 'beacon-network' sees greater activity. As to the business of TNCs being expensive- that depends. A used PK-232 ( very popular due to LED display and number of units sold ) can sometimes be found for around $50.00. Contrast this with the higher priced SCS-II TNC- and you see that there is a big variation in price. Many folks start with a 1200 BPS TNC, then later upgrade to 9600 BPS. Others avoid packet altogether and use the other digital modes eg. DMR. Before purchasing that 5100 radio, you might wish to talk to the digital groups that operate around Minneapolis and St. Paul. Sometimes it is more about who you wish to talk to, and why.
     

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