Is electronics knowledge still relevant in amateur radio?

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by W4RAV, Feb 3, 2018.

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  1. W4RAV

    W4RAV Ham Member QRZ Page

    There's an app (or two) for that! Goodwill has a "bin" store nearby, and there are literally a dozen people waiting around to dig in to each new load-out. Pulling books, scanning them with their phone, and, often, rudely tossing them onto what you're digging for. Used books is quite the industry. IMO, way too much work for way too little $$$. Or I'm just lazy. I have at least a 1000 books here, and if I took the time to list and sell each of them, might be able to buy a new radio or two! :)
     
    K7JEM likes this.
  2. HS0ZIB

    HS0ZIB Ham Member QRZ Page

    I've established several successful business before (in the UK and Thailand, not in Myanmar).

    In the UK, (and I'm sure the USA is similar), there is no leeway about the 'paperwork'. You have to make sure that everything is correct and all taxes paid. Ignorance is no excuse.

    In Thailand, one is only expected to pay a nominal amount of tax - I used to pay a few hundred dollars each year, and my accountant would calculate what monthly profit I was going to declare, even before that month had begun! The tax system was basically broken (actually, I don't think it had ever worked).

    I don't do any business in Myanmar because I'm not familiar with the various laws. But I read that only 7% of those individuals and companies who should be paying tax, actually do so....

    Despite their many problems, I enjoy living in both Thailand and Myanmar (and south-east Asia in general). There are no 'nanny states' here. Every person has to act responsibly.

    If you want to drink yourself to death in the go-go bars, then no one will stop you....

    For me, I learnt the need to be responsible many years ago. So I look after my health, don't break the rules, don't drink and drive etc etc. I get on with my enjoyable life (and job), and everyone who could make problems for me (tax department, police, army etc etc) leave me alone.
     
    W4RAV likes this.
  3. SM0AOM

    SM0AOM Ham Member QRZ Page

    It may be of interest to return to the original topic.

    We can make a thought experiment and envision amateur radio with the technical or electronics content removed.

    It may also be prudent to start with the international definition of amateur radio, from which the national definitions and rules are derived:

    "1.56 amateur service: A radiocommunication service for the purpose of self-training,
    intercommunication and technical investigations carried out by amateurs, that is, by duly authorized
    persons interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without pecuniary interest"

    The people behind this language certainly had "self-training" in radio technique and electronics in mind
    when this definition was originally drafted in the 1920s.

    We can then remove "self-training" and "technical investigations" first.
    What now remains is this:

    "1.56 amateur service: A radiocommunication service for the purpose of
    intercommunication carried out by amateurs, that is, by duly authorized
    persons interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without pecuniary interest"

    Finally the part of "interested in radio technique" can be removed to provide the new, "non-technical", amateur radio definition:

    "1.56 amateur service: A radiocommunication service for the purpose of
    intercommunication carried out by amateurs, that is, by duly authorized
    persons solely with a personal aim and without pecuniary interest"

    What other radio "service" except for the "duly authorized persons" does this remind us about?

    73/
    Karl-Arne
    SM0AOM
     
    W4RAV likes this.
  4. W4RAV

    W4RAV Ham Member QRZ Page

    Rigs of yesteryear were at least within reach of doing your own repairs. Today's radio requires a lot more than an o'scope and soldering iron.

    There ain't much on today's rig that I can work on without spending more for the tools than I did on the radio! Go ahead, try that 40W Weller on that CPU! :)

    (Image at least 2x actual size.)

    airspyv2_top_k2ncc001.jpg
     
  5. W4RAV

    W4RAV Ham Member QRZ Page

    THIS is more like what our hobby electronics was based upon.... Which is fine, if you have a radio from last century.

    Capture.PNG
     
  6. W4RAV

    W4RAV Ham Member QRZ Page

    Besides proper operating procedures, here's what *I* think we should be more focused on... Software. The future of amateur radio (if not in actuality, the present!).

    hamappscollection2014.jpg
     
  7. K1OIK

    K1OIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    I want my daughter to get the 20k
     
  8. K1OIK

    K1OIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    I am but there is a yearly limit of $14,000. I still cut coupons, I never eat out unless I have a coupon, I have a 7300, I keep the heat at 66, my extravagance is long showers. I would buy a Flex 6400M and their new amplifier if there wasn't a huge waiting list.
     
  9. VK4FFAB

    VK4FFAB Subscriber QRZ Page

    ^^ This. The reality is, even service techs are probably repairing to a board level. But hey you need to know resistor colour codes, like they are on SMD resistors LOL. My objection is not the electronics content, its the relevance of that content to me the end user today. Its nice to have to memorize the circuit diagrams of a collpits and hartly oscillator, but you try and find one in a modern rig, or for that matter in most modern homebrewing. DDS and PLL synths are cheep as chips, why would you build a collpits unless you were hell bent on building something old school, when you can have rock solid drift free frequency generation quite simply and easily. And that is but one example.
     
    WZ7U and WU8Y like this.
  10. N2EY

    N2EY Ham Member QRZ Page

    I found a paper copy of the chart.

    It starts in 1949, when EFJ sold 156 Viking Is, and ends in 1966, when they sold 52 Rangers, 35 Valiants, 18 6N2s, 54 Challengers and 16 10 meter Messengers - total of 175 units.

    In their peak year, 1954, EF Johnson sold 2100 Viking IIs, 228 Mobiles, 2800 Rangers and 935 Adventurers, for a total of 6063 transmitters. From 1951 until 1963, annual sales exceeded 1400 units.

    Total production from 1949 to 1966 was 53, 019 units. Except for 585 10 meter Messengers, all of the production was transmitters.

    EFJ rigs were definitely NOT inexpensive, even as kits; their least-expensive rig, a classic 50 watt input CW-only Novice rig called the Adventurer, cost $54.95 as a kit in the mid-1950s - the equivalent of $511 today. EFJ sold 6,142 Adventurers over a span of just 11 years.

    People talk about "the average ham" of the past, and how "everyone built their own transmitters" and such. Yet, in the 1950s and early 196os, one company manufactured and sold over 50,000 amateur radio transmitters!

    Who bought all those rigs?

    73 de Jim, N2EY
     
    WU8Y likes this.

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