ad: M2Ant-1

I don't want a house next to that.

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by N0OV, Jun 3, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
ad: l-rl
ad: Left-2
ad: L-MFJ
ad: Left-3
ad: l-BCInc
ad: abrind-2
ad: Subscribe
  1. N0OV

    N0OV Guest

    I just recently purchased a home and move to the country where I have some "antenna room"

    While searching for a house I found myself in an odd situation -- found a really nice house, however the home next store was owned by an amateur who had a massive beam set up.  After seeing that I quickly scratched this home off my list -- no one wants to live next to something like that.

    In reality, what I was thinking was the potential for QRM -- his ops interfering with mine and visa-versa.  However, in retrospect this may be the exact same thoughts potential home owners think when they are making purchasing decisions (thus driving alot of the restrictions so near and dear to all of our hearts.)

    The end story is we're in our new home.  Have no restrictions that would prevent me from putting up a tower.  However out of consideration to the others I am using stealthy configurations to get on the air.

    Guess I'm trying to keep a low profile and establish a log so if I do decide to upgrade my antenna farm there will be an established record of operation to show I'm not causing other folks problems.

    Bottom line is I'm on the air and having fun.  And the folks next to me have know idea what is outside "hanging in the trees".

    How many others have had a similiar experience and cherish keeping a low profile over putting up the biggest tower and antenna system you can get away with?

    -----------------------
    What a concept -- a post that doesn't talk politics, code, or slam CB  [​IMG]
     
  2. W5HTW

    W5HTW Ham Member QRZ Page

    I was here first. But then a neighbor moved in. My ONLY neighbor within a half mile. And, yeah, he was a ham.

    One evening he was over at my yard, chatting, and he mentioned that I needed to put a filter on my radio as I had been wiping out his stereo or something the night before. He had, he said, heard something like Morse, and it was 'very strong." Had to be me, right? It wasn't. I wasn't on the air, had not been for a week. So he asked if any other hams were around. None were; this is country and we had no other neighbors.

    Presumably what he saw/heard was power line interference, as we certainly get that.

    But I remember one day he was tellng me he was going to get on HF. Hmmmm. (He was a General class, had been for a while, I think.) I did not need him on HF, 200 yards from my antennas! This was, I supposed, "WAR." I put my amplifier in line.

    But he never got on HF and eventually he moved. He and his wife were on UHF only, or a dab of VHF FM. Oddly, I learned quite by accident still another ham owns some property east of me. We met one time, several years ago.

    Frankly, I think one ham per ten square miles is more than enough! You were very wise to cross that ham neighborhood off your list. Hams do NOT make good neighbors during normal conditions, and during DXing or contests, may key the transmitter with one hand and use the .357 with the other.

    Like you, I have a no restrictions area. Towers are no problem, except for the cost of them. For now I have no close neighbors, since that ham moved out, and I hope it stays that way. In fact, I'm thinking of doing a bit of work on one of the antennas today! Wind blew down a dipole overnight. I'd like to wait till the end of the windy season to do antenna work, but I've been living out here 22 years and the windy season hasn't ended yet, so I doubt I can wait.

    Glad you found what you needed, home-wise. Enjoy!

    Ed
     
  3. K6UEY

    K6UEY Ham Member QRZ Page

    My previous location was one in the city limits and on a normal city lot. I had erected a 85 foot tower,with lots of aluminum in the air,a 7 el HF on a 40' boom a 40M rotatable dipole,a 75m full vertical loop,plus misc. VHF/UHF antennas sprouting from the tower. I was 1st owner of the house,in fact I waited 4 months for the contractor to finish before I could move in. I lived in the house for 35 years before I moved. My tower was plainly visable for a radius of about 10 blocks. My feeling about new neighbors who objected to the sight of my tower was they were not qualified to be a good neighbor,and I appreciated them taking their views to another neighborhood.When I moved in I immediately first couple of week ends put up 50' of Rohn tower,no antennas just the tower,and of course the television complaints came rolling in,after the first 6 months of conditioning,I had no more complaints the remainder of the 35 years I was there.If you go out of your way to show consideration for others they will demmand more,if you live your life and encourage them to live theirs,everyone seems to get along.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. K3UD

    K3UD Guest

    in 1978 I moved into my present house in a subdivision that had no covenants, no HOA and no restrictions on antennas and towers except a building permit was needed if you go higher than 50 feet.

    This was at a time when the town I live in was considered a fringe area for over the air TV and a lot of people in the subdivision had towers or push up poles ranging from 15 - 50 feet.  I erected a 38 foot tower which tops out at 42 feet to the top of the mast. It is self supporting and bracketed to my house.
    In time, many trees in the neighborhood grew to a point that you almost have to know where it is to see it whan you are coming down the street.

    The house on my left side has been bought and sold 3 times in the 26 years and the house on the right has sold once. My antenna was never an issue as to selling the houses and I have never received a complaint about it.

    On occassion I have thought about putting up a 60-70 foot crank up but always thought better of it for the reasons you have mentioned.  

    If it were me, I think I would put  a modest tower of 30 - 40 feet and see what happens. I would put it in the back of the house and centered so that no element of your beams even begin to encroach on the property lines.

    Under no circumstances would I have any conversation with a neighbor which could be construed as asking their permission to do this. I would just put it up than if any questions are asked invite them in and show them your shack and denonstrate how you use it. and answer all questions. Might be an excuse for a BBQ with them [​IMG]

    73
    George
    K3UD
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I have no restrictions where I am located but over the past several years I sold off all my towers except one ( I use that for business comms). I use hidden antennas now but guess what I am having a real blast working the world with low power and hidden antennas. Darn those things work better than they have a right to.
     
  6. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    I guess I'm really the opposite of you guys on all counts.

    First, I have no problems living next door to another ham, even a very active one with big towers and antennas. The first thing that occurs to me is a shared antenna farm and working out operating schedules to never be on the same band at the same time unless absolutely necessary.

    I currently live *very* close to several active hams who run legal-limit power, including K6SMF, who's down the street from me with kilowatt+ level power on all bands and five towers (and ten beams) that can be seen for a long distance, and we've been neighbors for 3+ years now with nary a problem of any kind. Simply not aiming our beams at each other solves almost any sort of interference.

    Then, it would never even occur to me to be "low profile." Life's too short for me to worry about what the neighbors think. I'm sure they don't care what I think, and I don't blame them. But I'm very friendly with all of them, and immediately visited each after putting up my tower and getting on the air, to see if they had any RFI problems. Those who did have problems, I resolved with ferrite filters or whatever worked.

    Why throw away useful years of enjoyment? To qualm the neighbors? Holy cow. That's a bit like avoiding seafood, which you love, because the neighbors might not like how it smells when you grill it. Give me a break.

    WB2WIK/6
     
  7. N0OV

    N0OV Guest

    Great posts and honest feedback.

    I will likely follow the advice and put up a power a little later, but other home improvements have priority.

    Our last home we lived about 7 houses down from a very active amateur who lived to DX on 20 meter. Also never had a problem -- in fact he was a great Elmer who taught me a few effective tricks on how to improve the ground on my equipment and chase down some RFI issues.

    Wonder who else has similiar stories, opinions, or advise?
     
  8. K9STH

    K9STH Ham Member QRZ Page

    In the City of Richardson, Texas, there is a licensed amateur radio operator on average every 3 blocks in the residential areas. Of course this is an effect of being in the "telecom corridor". Even back when Collins Radio and Texas Instruments were the two major employers this was true! Even two years ago there were 1128 amateurs who live in Richardson or within a few blocks in the City of Dallas. This doesn't include Plano which has a "fair" number of amateur radio operators as well.

    K5CQ lives 2 blocks (the "short way") from me and there are several other amateurs within 5 or 6 blocks. A number of these amateurs are on HF. Frankly, there are still a number of tube type rigs in this area because of the high number of operators. Tube rigs are much more compatible (in general) than solid state rigs. Also, a number of amateurs run linears on a regular basis.

    My towers have been up for over 32 years and only one person has ever complained about them. They are pretty new to the area. However, the complaint was only heard about once! In fact, several neighbors tell me that if I ever move that I have to leave the towers behind! It seems that is how they tell people how to find their houses! My main tower and that of K5CQ are visible from the freeway over a mile away. Although his tower is about 25 feet taller than mine (at least the top antenna when figured from ground level) my top antenna appears slightly higher than his from the freeway because his house is down the hill from mine!

    The City of Richardson has an "unreasonable" tower ordinance: You can't go over 100 feet in a residential area without a variance! In fact, you cannot safely guy a 100 foot tower on most residential lots! When that ordinance was written the mayor held a General Class license and several of the other city council members were also licensed (around 1963 or 1964). Thus, the city council was "very" amateur radio friendly!

    For those who haven't looked at my antennas, go to

    http://home.comcast.net/~k9sth

    The link is near the top.

    Glen, K9STH
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Someone lives in an area without ANY CC&R's and is worried about the neighbors? I can and do understand and appreciate being considerate of your neighbors (and that's a good thing!, to use Martha Stewart's phrase!) but if I had the room for a tower or two.. and the resources for it. AND the need for it (HF/VHF) then by good golly UP IT WOULD GO!

    Like the one guy said. put 'just the tower(s) up and see if any complaints come in.

    once the dust settles.. have at it!

    But..to each their own.. if being self-restrictive with your own internal CC&R's is what you are happy doing, have at it! But for most of us.. if we can.. we should!

    Nothing like a nice pair or more of vertiical aluminum tree trunks with lots of aluminum branches in the yard to make for a beeeyoootiful sight!

    K3FT
     
  10. K3UD

    K3UD Guest

    Within a mile radius of my house there are 14 hams, 5 who live within several blocks. I agree with Steve that operating conflicts can be worked out as we do it all the time. Since I am not a hard core contestor or DXer, my 40 footer, tribander, 100 watts and decent wire antennas do a good job. However maybe I will re-think the 60 - 70 foot crank up If I can get my wife to go along [​IMG] It would be nice to be able to put a VHF/UHF stack up that high.


    73
    George
    K3UD
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page