How to Fix a Bad Radio Voice

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by N8FVJ, Oct 8, 2019.

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  1. W7UUU

    W7UUU Super Moderator Lifetime Member 133 Administrator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    And certainly do NOT need reverb/echo/roger beeps

    Dave
    W7UUU
     
    KA4DPO, KA0HCP, G0GSR and 5 others like this.
  2. N8FVJ

    N8FVJ Ham Member QRZ Page

    It is superficial, but is present at times. Nothing wrong with 'putting your best foot forward'.
     
    G3ZPF likes this.
  3. WE4E

    WE4E Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I'll agree that over processed audio is hard to listen to for any length of time. I can tell stories. By the same token, I happen to think that rich, full audio is more pleasant to listen to and easier to copy content from. There's a balance to be struck.

    Also agree. I have to concede, however, that a little kiss of reverb, properly done, can sound good on AM.
     
  4. KF4ZGZ

    KF4ZGZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Browning ping ........
    Or better yet the sound of the mile long leaf spring contacts in a Turner mic on a "AM dedicated channelized transmitter". Sounded like slapping two 2x4s together.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
    WZ7U likes this.
  5. N2EY

    N2EY Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I have a face for radio and a voice for mime.
     
    K8AI, N2SR, WA9SVD and 1 other person like this.
  6. AG4RT

    AG4RT Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Yes, but how are your hands?
     
  7. N2EY

    N2EY Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    "That's a rather personal question, sir!"

     
    AG4RT likes this.
  8. N1BCG

    N1BCG Ham Member QRZ Page

    I completely agree that equalization plays a significant role in the quality and effectiveness of one’s signal, however, trying to ram boosted lows or highs through a transmitter designed for 300-3k will only degrade performance.

    Of course your audio is also only as good as the receiver’s audio. If your regular QSO buddies all have panel mounted 3” speakers then that “Mr. Big Voice” EQ setting will be for nothing.

    Fortunately, today’s manufacturers are recognizing the appeal of “rag-chew” audio and more rigs are starting to appear where subtle audio contouring will go a long way. Flex, Anan, and even iCom to a degree, come to mind.

    It’s also important to decide who you’re trying to sound a certain way to. I’ve found that most ops enjoy listening to crisp, natural audio, particularly for extended QSOs. In-your-face compression not only gets tiring to listen to but hearing an op inhale between words or amplifying mouth noises to intimate levels gets tedious very quickly.

    Setting audio processing is like adding spices to a meal. Moderation is key for a broad appeal.
     
    KA0HCP, WE4E and K3XR like this.
  9. KA8NCR

    KA8NCR Ham Member QRZ Page

    I don't disagree that listening to someone who sounds equipped to do contesting from the open door of a helicopter, in flight, is quite fatiguing.

    Audio experimentation is a popular aspect of the hobby, I get that. I'm just not all that interested in worrying about how I fill a room on a ~3kHz communications grade mode. If that's what you enjoy and want to spend your money on, do it up.
     
  10. KY5U

    KY5U Subscriber QRZ Page

    No matter what the equalizer does, it won't cure the Northern Midwest accent also known as Yankeebonics. And whatnot.
     
    N5PAR, WZ7U and W4IOA like this.

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