How time changes things - Checking if frequency is in use on CW

Discussion in 'On-Air Operations - Q&A' started by KG5NII, Jul 2, 2017.

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  1. K3XR

    K3XR Ham Member QRZ Page

    I think this thread has a more recent counterpart. The other deals with digital and CW signals on the same frequency. It occurs to me that if CW and digital signals are permitted on the same frequency (CW the entire band) how do stations who have no knowledge/interest in CW check to see if the frequency is in use? Some of the bands i.e. 30 meters also have other government users that complicate the issue.
     
  2. W5WN

    W5WN Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    That's a problem for folks that either mute their receive audio (as I do) or don't have a panadapter. I have a panadapter so I can see signals on the frequency. However, the safest thing to do is stay within the popular digital band segment for the mode being used.
     
  3. VK6ZGO

    VK6ZGO Ham Member QRZ Page

    The reason I am quoting this old post is that it saves me looking for my 1976 Handbook!
    In the first attached page. it says:-
    ........in which case, an inquiry "Is the frequency in use?", or on CW , the Morse letter C (didit dit)....
    This was confusing to the newcomer, who knew that "C" was "dahdidahdit", so they would have either assumed that they should send the latter, or that the attribution in the text was wrong.


    I have a lot of respect for tne Handbook, but it does "have form" for misprints, & missing clarifying parts of sentences.
    In this case, all that was necessary was to, in the bracket following "didit dit", have "C in the old American Morse".
     
  4. KB5SXC

    KB5SXC Ham Member QRZ Page

     
  5. KB5SXC

    KB5SXC Ham Member QRZ Page

    I remember I = is E = excited, when checking for a frequency in use. Your Elmers must have been from Marconi's students.
    In the 1950's this was explained to be SOP in the teens and twenties. I was told back then it fell out of use in the mid twenties.
    73
     

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