How I Deal With Stucco...

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by WJ6F, Mar 26, 2017.

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  1. WA7PRC

    WA7PRC Ham Member QRZ Page

    At the world's largest OEM of RF-driven sealed CO2 Lasers, that was the technique we used for our kilowatt-up RF sources to drive Lasers on 40.68 and other frequencies. Even though 40.68 is an ISM frequency and it's OK to radiate, it was good to "keep the Genie" in the bottle to prevent RFI. One of our sources would do 10kW RFOUT.
     
  2. K6BRN

    K6BRN XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Ummmm.... no.

    It's NOT OK to radiate unlimited amounts of RF on ANY frequency. Safety standards govern that when ITU, Federal and local spectrum use regs don't. You had a leaky screen, not a shield, probably to knock down stray emissions to some presumably man-safe levels. And it was apparently a cheap one if it really used chicken wire. Hope you had a good EMI/EMC team on call and did frequent testing/monitoring. Excess RF emissions at that frequency usually causes eye damage, and not because of the optical emissions of the lasers. I presume you were trained on that if you worked in the area. But maybe not. How's your vision?

    At the worlds largest producer of satellite comms equipment, we did a little bit better. And were continuously monitored by ourselves and government watchdogs. Rusty chicken wire was not something anyone with serious shielding aspirations gets away with, at ANY frequency. We didn't, because we couldn't. And we would have liked to, because chicken wire is cheap.

    Brian - K6BRN
     
  3. WA7PRC

    WA7PRC Ham Member QRZ Page

    Assumptions.
     
  4. K6BRN

    K6BRN XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    More like an educated guess from an engineer who has had to run RF-heavy labs governed by OSHA regulations, and guided by your statements regarding construction technique and purpose. Remember: GIGO.
     
  5. WA7PRC

    WA7PRC Ham Member QRZ Page

    Yes, a guess... aka assumption.
     
  6. K6BRN

    K6BRN XML Subscriber QRZ Page

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