Good HF No Radial Vertical?

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio Equipment Reviews' started by AA9ZZ, Jun 14, 2008.

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  1. AA9ZZ

    AA9ZZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Is there such a thing as a good HF no radial multiband vertical?
     
  2. W4INF

    W4INF Ham Member QRZ Page

    Welcome to Zed. IMHO, I cant picture a vertical without radials working worth a hoot. Ive read some reviews, I forget if it was a Gap or BTV type tenna, but some gave it good reviews. I think they must have moved up from a coat hanger to have thought it did "well".

    Put in some radials on a vertical, it will be worth the time and trouble.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
     
  3. G4ILO

    G4ILO Ham Member QRZ Page

    There are some verticals that are half wave dipoles fed in the center. I think Cushcraft make some. I think MFJ also has some that work on that principle. But they are either pretty tall, or the elements for the lower bands are shortened.

    I have never been in a position to try one, but I should imagine they work pretty good, because the point of most radiation - the feed point - is elevated above ground compared to a quarter wave ground mounted vertical.
     
  4. NN4RH

    NN4RH Premium Subscriber QRZ Page


    The GAP antennas are vertical dipoles. No radials.

    Google "Vertical Dipole" for information about how to build your own.
     
  5. W4PG

    W4PG Super Moderator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    I've used the Cushcraft series of verticals with "counterpoise" radials at the bottom, short (couple of feet) wires that are at the bottom of the antenna near the feedline. I currently have the R-8 up on the roof. They seem to work fairly well and I have no complaints other than some mechanical issues with the R-8 and the inability to tune it as well as previous models.

    If you're looking for a vertical but don't have the room to run the typical radial wires, take a look at one of these antennas.

    ............Bob
     
  6. W4INF

    W4INF Ham Member QRZ Page

    Well then, in then in that case, the GAP would be good without radials!

    Thank you RH for the additional information-
    Andrew
     
  7. KB4UHK

    KB4UHK Ham Member QRZ Page

    Sure.. the Inverted-V kicks buttocks.

    However if that isn't vertical enough, there is the counterpoise. For apartment dwellers or others who need to have a stealthy antenna, a ground plane isn't an option. It's possible to use, for instance, the bulding's rain gutter system as a counterpoise. If the building is big enough, it's a substantial counterpoise. The vertical will work, just not the same as one with an actual ground plane.

    I'm not in that particular situation anymore, but my 2m antenna is a homebrew vertical dipole. Works well, so why not.
     
  8. KD0BIK

    KD0BIK XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    When I first setup my 6BTV I didn't put radials down. The vertical w/o radials worked ok. The following weekend I put down a few radials for 10 and 20 meters and the vertical worked better. The following weekend I put even more down and the vertical worked even better.

    So....you may find a brand or type that says radials not required....but put them down and you'll see how much better it performs.

    Good luck,
    Jerry
     
  9. AD5WY

    AD5WY Ham Member QRZ Page

    Outbacker Outpost

    The Outbacker Outpost works for me (basically a big metal tripod that is 'capacitively coupled to the ground, eliminating the need for radials'. Thats the fluff and hype, anyway; but it DOES seem to work very well).

    I have an Outbacker Outreach that I use on it. I think there are probably better antennas to use (screwdrivers, hamsticks - easier to use), but this combination works pretty good. I've run across references on the web on how to make a sort of home-made Outpost using copper sheeting (for example).
     
  10. KA5S

    KA5S Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Yes. What MAKES one good is engineering, installation and location, not necessarily in that order. A vertical half-wavelength antenna is much less critical to feed than a quarter wavelength antenna. See for example the Cushcraft R6000 or the R8. Not to mention the Force 12.

    Cortland
    KA5S
     
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