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Gates 833A tube.

Discussion in 'Amplitude Modulation' started by N4WLL, Jun 27, 2021.

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  1. W7TFO

    W7TFO Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    OK!

    73DG
     
  2. K4KYV

    K4KYV Premium Subscriber Volunteer Moderator QRZ Page

    Looks like it supports the big rheostat in series with the +HV line, used to fine-adjust the PA plate voltage. I found that to be useless in my BC1-T, so I took it out, and replaced it with an 800Ω bank of fixed power resistors, which drop the PA plate from 2600v down to around 2300v. But keep the full HV on the modulator, increasing positive peak capability to around 140%. Very rarely hit that high, but now the modulator doesn't flat-top and splatter on those occasional peaks.
     
  3. N4WLL

    N4WLL Ham Member QRZ Page

    My bad, I shouldn't have been measuring at 2AM. They are 3" not 2¾.
     
  4. W7TFO

    W7TFO Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    That pot is there so the operator can try and keep the FCC output power between -10% and +5%.

    73DG
     
    AC0OB likes this.
  5. N4WLL

    N4WLL Ham Member QRZ Page

    Did you ever get around to mailing them? No hurry if you haven't, and I can pay for the shipping if you'd like.
     
  6. N4WLL

    N4WLL Ham Member QRZ Page

    Resurrecting this thread with something a bit interesting.

    After a lengthy cleaning of the building that used to house WKMG in Newberry, SC, (Where the original tube this thread was about came from.) the owner reached out to me saying they had found more tubes. After luckily receiving them all in one piece, despite being under packed, I went through them and found these two.
    IMG_20220111_133807190.jpg

    I believe they are dated 1968, which would be the year WKMG first went on the air.
    I found it interesting that these just say GATES, but the other one I found said Harris Gates. Maybe the Harris Gates one was provided at a later date after they had changed the tube branding.
     
    K0UO likes this.
  7. W9GB

    W9GB Ham Member QRZ Page

    HARRIS-INTERTYPE;
    Buys Gates Radio Co., Maker of Electronics Equipment

    November 6, 1957 (New York Times)
    https://www.nytimes.com/1957/11/06/...-radio-co-maker-of-electronics-equipment.html
    Harris kept the Gates brand name alive by putting the Gates sticker on the back of numerous transmitters that were labeled Harris on the front panels.
     
  8. K5UJ

    K5UJ Ham Member QRZ Page

    And so began the "value engineering" period of Gates that produced the BC-1T, and G, and the Vanguards. "Printed wiring" and horizontal 807s.
     
    KA4KOE likes this.
  9. K4KYV

    K4KYV Premium Subscriber Volunteer Moderator QRZ Page

    "...the finest transmitter money can buy" :rolleyes:
     
  10. WA3VJB

    WA3VJB Ham Member QRZ Page

    William, thanks for the follow up. Those "GATES" tubes are an interesting artifact for anyone like yourself with one of the BC-1 series transmitters. The line finished out with the BC1-H, which had a smaller cabinet, and arrayed those 833A from left to right behind an observation window, rather than the front-to-back configuration down the right side of the cabinet.

    I see that you're right across Rt. 5 from the old WFOY-AM tower site. I went down there with a "transmitter rescue crew" to pick up a Collins 300-G that the station bought new in 1951. The site, at One Radio Rd., has long been plowed under and replaced by a multi-family housing module. But it had been a wonderful part of broadcast radio heritage, next to the Fountain of Youth, for which it was named.

    During our trip, which included Jim, W8MAQ and Tom, W2ILA, I sat outside the old station house and interviewed the son of the founder of WFOY, which went on the air in the 1930s. John, WD4KQX, provided a lot of local history in addition to talking about his father's radio station.

    You might enjoy his storytelling.
    https://qsl.net/wa3vjb/John R. Fraser-WD4KQX.wav

    [​IMG]

    I hope your 833A tubes test good. If they're useable at all, I can imagine some photographic opportunities with some glowing plate action and filiments showing into the transmitter's dummy load.

    The late 1960s were the Gates Radio Company's final years from its vaccum-tube heritage over to solid state. I have a Gates Studioette console that's the same vintage as your transmitter.
     
    N4WLL likes this.

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