FCC Report and Order Posted on New Rules

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by AA7BQ, Dec 19, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
ad: L-HROutlet
ad: l-rl
ad: Subscribe
ad: Left-2
ad: L-MFJ
ad: Left-3
  1. K7JEM

    K7JEM Ham Member QRZ Page

    These are not against the rules.

    You can repair but not modify your radio

    You can go to 60 ft (or more).

    You can communicate with anyone with a CB.

    Joe
     
  2. AE6IP

    AE6IP Ham Member QRZ Page

    Having watched y'all invade our internet without giving any thought to its jargon, I find statements like this one show ignorance and arrogance.

    In model railroading, people who'd rather "do it the right way" than have fun with it are called "rivet counters", because of their obsession with detail that almost no one else will ever notice.

    What shall we call them in amateur radio?

    Eh, who cares what you call them, so long as they stay out of the way when the rest of us are having fun.

    I for one welcome into amateur radio, as I do into any hobby, anyone who makes an effort to participate and enjoy the hobby, even if they happen to spell Old Man "good buddy".
     
  3. K4JF

    K4JF Ham Member QRZ Page

    "A CB antenna may not be more than 20 feet above the tree or structure on which it is located.  In addition, it may not be more than 60 feet above the ground."  So sometimes you can go to 60 feet (if you have a 40 foot tall building), but not more.

    "Each internal repair and each internal adjustment to your FCC type-accepted CB transmitter must be made BY or under the DIRECT SUPERVISION of a person licensed by the FCC as a GENERAL RADIOTELEPHONE OPERATOR."  Not the CBer, unless he is licensed to repair. And NOBODY is allowed to modify one, at all. Any repair work must return it to factory specifications.

    So 2 of my 3 are verified from the regs.  There has been a change to the regs on communicating with stations outside your family or business, but the communications must still be limited to conversation about your personal or business activities.  Except for emergency, of course.  (There are no such limitations on ham communications.)  

    You cannot "communicate with anyone with a CB".  They must be in the U.S. or Canada, and can't be more than 155.3 miles away.  So you can't, for example, talk to anyone in Mexico on a CB, even if you are in El Paso.

    I hadn't looked up CB regs in quite a while.  I've been retired almost 6 years.

    Still, if you follow the rules, you are severely limited as compared to ham radio.  THAT was my point.
     
  4. K4JF

    K4JF Ham Member QRZ Page

    As for the "handles", they are authorized only in conjunction with specific rules for identifying yourself. Not alone, as is commonly done.

    {B} You are ENCOURAGED to identify your CB communications by any of the following means:
    [1] Previously assigned FCC CB call sign
    [2] K prefix followed by operators initials and residence zip code
    [3] Your name;
    or
    [4] Description of your organization including name and any applicable operator unit number
     
  5. K7JEM

    K7JEM Ham Member QRZ Page

    § 95.408 (CB Rule 8) How high may I
    put my antenna?
    (a) Antenna means the radiating system
    (for transmitting, receiving or
    both) and the structure holding it up
    (tower, pole or mast). It also means everything
    else attached to the radiating
    system and the structure.
    (b) If your antenna is mounted on a
    hand-held portable unit, none of the
    following limitations apply.
    © If your antenna is installed at a
    fixed location, it (whether receiving,
    transmitting or both) must comply
    with either one of the following:
    (1) The highest point must not be
    more than 6.10 meters (20 feet) higher
    than the highest point of the building
    or tree on which it is mounted; or
    (2) The highest point must not be
    more than 18.3 meters (60 feet) above
    the ground.

    This means that on flat ground you can mount a tower that will position the tip of your CB antenna at 60', and still be legal. It also means that if you have a 100 ft tree or building, that you can position the tip of the antenna 20ft above that. Don't know where you get your info, mine is from the FCC rules 2004. I don't think they've changed.

    § 95.424 (CB Rule 24) How do I have
    my CB station transmitter serviced?
    (a) You may adjust an antenna to
    your CB transmitter and you may
    make radio checks. (A radio check
    means a one way transmission for a
    short time in order to test the transmitter.)
    (b) You are responsible for the proper
    operation of the station at all times
    and are expected to provide for observations,
    servicing and maintenance as
    often as may be necessary to ensure
    proper operation. You must have all internal
    repairs or internal adjustments
    to your CB transmitter made in accordance
    with the Technical Regulations
    (see subpart E). The internal repairs
    or internal adjustments should be
    performed by or under the immediate
    supervision and responsibility of a person
    certified as technically qualified to
    perform transmitter maintenance and
    repair duties in the private land mobile
    services and fixed services by an organization
    or committee representative
    of users in those services.

    This rule section allows you to choose whatever service people you think are qualified. No mention of a general radiotelephone license is mentioned. You "should" have the repairs done by a "qualified" tech, but it's not required, as long as the repairs and adjustments are done properly. Again, I don't know where you get your info.

    Or 0 of 3 have been verified. You must have a very old copy of the rules or something. The regs of communication are pretty open, since the list of prohibited things is pretty much the other stuff you have posted.

    You can talk about all kinds of business things on CB that you can't do on ham, but yes, other than that there are limitations. And the "talk with anyone" on CB was in reference to your perceived limitation to your family or business. Yes, they need to be in the CB service, and all the other restrictions you have named, but they could be total strangers to whom you have no connection.

    Joe
     
  6. K7JEM

    K7JEM Ham Member QRZ Page

    § 95.417 (CB Rule 17) Do I identify my
    CB communications?
    (a) You need not identify your CB
    communications.
    (b) [You are encouraged to identify
    your CB communications by any of the
    following means:
    (1) Previously assigned CB call sign;
    (2) K prefix followed by operator initials
    and residence zip code;
    (3) Name; or
    (4) Organizational description including
    name and any applicable operator
    unit number.]
    © [You are encouraged to use your
    ‘‘handle’’ only in conjuction with the
    methods of identification listed in
    paragraph (b) of this section.]
     
  7. AE6IP

    AE6IP Ham Member QRZ Page

  8. K4JF

    K4JF Ham Member QRZ Page

    1. I looked up current CB regs online. As I noted, I haven't used one since I retired (other than to listen for band openings that might also be on 10m), so I admit I was off on some things I remember. (After your comment, I do remember when the 60 foot rule was put in. Originally it was 20 feet, period.)

    2. As for the comment about "percieved" limitations on who you can talk to, that was "percieved" from the original CB regs, which specified that you communicate only with other units of your own licensed group. That is another area where the regs have changed.

    It is fact that CB was never intended for "hobby type" communications, but rather communications to furthur family or business activities. It was not originally designed to be the unlicensed equivalent of ham, the way it is most often used.

    It is interesting that we should get into a discussion of CB regs here, since they are irrelevant to hams, and ignored by most CBers. :eek:)
     
  9. K4JF

    K4JF Ham Member QRZ Page

    I'm not talking about rivet counters and you know it. I'm trying to encourage people to fit in, by learning the correct way to go about it. You're not helping new people if you don't help them learn about the activity. And part of learning about it is learning the language. As I said, every activity (and profession, for that matter) has its own jargon. That's just the way it is.

    If you start in model railroading and insist on calling diesel engines "electric" engines (which is partly correct) you are not going to make friends, nor will you encourage people to help you.

    If you come into ham radio and insist on using jargon from another service, the same thing will happen.

    The best way to welcome newcomers is to help them. The best way to have fun in your new avocation is to be open to being helped.
     
  10. KB1SF

    KB1SF Ham Member QRZ Page

    I'm not talking about rivet counters and you know it.  I'm trying to encourage people to fit in, by learning the correct way to go about it.  You're not helping new people if you don't help them learn about the activity.  And part of learning about it is learning the language.  As I said, every activity (and profession, for that matter) has its own jargon.  That's just the way it is.

    If you start in model railroading and insist on calling diesel engines "electric" engines (which is partly correct) you are not going to make friends, nor will you encourage people to help you.

    If you come into ham radio and insist on using jargon from another service, the same thing will happen.[/QUOTE]
    ....and, just like the rest of the English language, that "jargon" is perpetually changing.  

    Actually, I'd like to know which snob among us has now anointed themselves "Chief of Amateur Radio Terms" to decide which terms are (or are not) "correct".  That is, who among us is now responsible for keeping the "official" dictionary of "approved" terms for Amateur Radio use?  

    For example, one hardly ever hears the term "Lid" used these days in reference to poor operators on the Amateur bands.  Does that term now need to be stricken from the dictionary?  And even the term "Old Man" seems to be falling by the wayside as of late. We also are substituting the word "Op" for "Name" in a lot of our CW conversations these days.  Does that word now need to be added to the "official" list?

    What's more, participants in the two services frequently borrow each other's terms.  "73" originated on the Ham Bands (probably because it has a nice "swing" to it on CW).  But the CB folks have since picked that term up and have now bastardized it into any number of different variations, some of which are now coming back around to be heard on the Ham bands, too.

    Seriously, folks, once again, we're making mountains out of molehills.  

    I agree that peer pressure and the natural human desire of most individuals for "belongingness" (that is, to "fit in") will create enough of an incentive for newcomers to our Service to use terminology appropriate for where they are operating.

    But, "Elmering" those new folks into our Service can also be done in such a way as to not cause embarrassment.  These days, most of us have e-mail addresses, and those addresses can be found in any number of ways, including right here on QRZ.com.  

    What's more, the old "praise in public and correct in private" approach applies equally well to Ham Radio.  That is, if we happen to hear someone on the bands doing or saying something inappropriate, we can always send them a private e-mail note and GENTLY suggest ways how they might change their behavior.  

    But, attempting such "corrections" over the air will simply perpetuate more bad feelings and "I'm better than you" snobbery.  And we already have quite enough of BOTH of those in our ranks as it is.

    73,

    Keith
    KB1SF / VA3KSF
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page