FCC and BPL

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by W7TUX, Feb 13, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
ad: L-HROutlet
ad: l-rl
ad: Left-3
ad: Left-2
ad: Subscribe
ad: L-MFJ
ad: abrind-2
  1. K3UD

    K3UD Guest

    Several possible outcomes:

    1. Service providers spend billions setting up service via BPL to large parts of the country. Immediate problems manifest themselves such as licensed services in the HF region begin tripping the system off or otherwise degrading the system to the point where its users complain loudly to the service providers. These providers go the FCC and Congress telling them that they want their investments to be protected and to "do something" about the interference that licensed services are causing. The FCC decides to changes the rules and this ends Amateur Radio as we know it.

    2. Same scenario as above except that the FCC tells the service providers that, Hey, we told you that you needed filters, we told you that your system had to accept interference and not interfere with licensed services, and we told you that we were not going to change Part 15 rules. You told us that you could handle these requirements…. TOUGH.

    3. The who thing degrades into guerrilla warfare between licensed services and the end user of the technology, kind of like it did with the TVI battles when television became standard in most homes. Hams get sued, consumers lobby city councils to pass interference ordinances, and failing that, take a page from the CC&R book and get cities and towns to make zoning changes which deny private owners of transmitters above a certain power output level to use them. (I actually saw this in the covenants of a new subdivision)
    Failing that, they go after antennas via ordinance route, and failing that we get into things like cutting feedlines and physical confrontation. Maybe the FCC washes its hands and allows local governments to regulate in this way.

    4. Service providers, after a few brief BPL installations realize that they can not meet the technical requirements but spend some R&D money to come up with an alternative which operates in the microwave region. Another possibility might be that with all the up front capital needed, the rates will not be competitive with DSL and Cable resulting in very little customer base in the cities and towns, and limiting the customer base in rural regions where the consumer just will not pay what is required to get faster service than dial up.

    There are probably many more outcomes, these are my top picks.

    73
    George
    K3UD
     
  2. K9STH

    K9STH Platinum Subscriber Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    BGO:

    The distribution lines in most cities run between 7200 and 7800 volts. Those in the "country" often run between 14.4 KV and 15.2 KV. The actual "high tension" lines run 138 KV these days for most cross country lines although there are still a "fair" number of 69 KV lines still around. The 138 KV are usually on the large steel towers or the large wooden poles. The 69 KV lines are usually on smaller steel towers that you sometimes see running down the middle of the roadway in some cities, etc. Sometimes these are on single ("monopole") aluminum poles running along the street right-of-way.

    BPL won't be on any of the "high tension" lines, but especially the 7200 volt to 7800 volt lines will be used.

    Glen, K9STH
     
  3. KI4BGO

    KI4BGO Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (K9STH @ Feb. 13 2004,11:11)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">BGO:

    The distribution lines in most cities run between 7200 and 7800 volts.  Those in the &quot;country&quot; often run between 14.4 KV and 15.2 KV.  The actual &quot;high tension&quot; lines run 138 KV these days for most cross country lines although there are still a &quot;fair&quot; number of 69 KV lines still around.  The 138 KV are usually on the large steel towers or the large wooden poles.  The 69 KV lines are usually on smaller steel towers that you sometimes see running down the middle of the roadway in some cities, etc.  Sometimes these are on single (&quot;monopole&quot;) aluminum poles running along the street right-of-way.

    BPL won't be on any of the &quot;high tension&quot; lines, but especially the 7200 volt to 7800 volt lines will be used.

    Glen, K9STH[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    Thanks for that info, Glen. I do live in a rural area served by a member-owned electric co-op. My location explains the 14.4KV- that's the voltage on the primary side of the transformer serving my house! Maybe they won't need to get the &quot;bpl monster&quot; too close to me since that transformer serves my house, and my mother's next door and that's it. I'm going to ask at the co-op office, if they plan to do this, since it seems that only the more populated areas are affected (so far) [​IMG]
     
  4. K9KJM

    K9KJM Ham Member QRZ Page

    Unfortunatly, I am afraid that the bleak picture painted by AI9NL is all too true.
    It is not too early to call your local power provider and ask them right out if they have any plans to &quot;provide broadband service of any type?&quot;  And if so, HOW they intend to provide it?? (Some power companies are considering running fiber optic lines on the poles)
    Which is the correct way to do it of course. Fiber optic and everyone wins: Power company gets a great valuable communications system, Consumers get another broadband choice, hams are not bothered!
    (Well, Almost everyone wins....... Cable TV companies and the local phone companies offering DSL wont be too
    happy with the new competition)
    Do whatever you can to convince your local utility that
    BPL is only good for the vendors who sell BPL equipment!!    (Which is the true bottom line)
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page