CW: How to Send Coordinates in Degrees with Minutes and Seconds?

Discussion in 'Working Different Modes' started by WI2D, Nov 7, 2010.

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  1. WA4OTD

    WA4OTD Ham Member QRZ Page

    Just curious, why do you need to do this? I haven't heard this is 35 years of operating.

     
  2. AL7N

    AL7N Ham Member QRZ Page

    Coordinates CW Morse

    I guess it would be useful if you had to tell someone via CW
    exactly where you were on earth for whatever reason...

    Kinda nice to know that info anyway....I always wondered just where I was...
     
  3. WA4OTD

    WA4OTD Ham Member QRZ Page

    EM69 is close enough for me! ;)

     
  4. G4LNA

    G4LNA Ham Member QRZ Page

    Have a listen to the Prinsendam PJTA sending the SOS and position, scroll along to about 2 minutes 30 seconds after all the procedure signals and you'll hear Jack, god rest him, sending their position, it sounds clear enough to me the way he sends it.
    http://www.qsl.net/n1ea/sos_de_pjta_small_file_size.mp3
     
  5. AL7N

    AL7N Ham Member QRZ Page

    Prinsendam incident

    That was an interesting recording....PJTA sent the autoalarm signal TWICE
    which should have caused some of those other stations to shut the hell up and listen...Lots of unnecessary QRM.

    Where was this received at and recorded?

    When I was a commercial op standing watch on 500 kc, that autoalarm
    signal usually caused 600 meters to go plumb silent..if it didn't, the SOS
    call sure did. Coastguard coast stations receiving repeated the SOS with a DDD.

    That got everyone's attention PDQ. Then you just listened if you weren't
    in any position to help out, until QUM....
     
  6. G4LNA

    G4LNA Ham Member QRZ Page

    I'm not sure where it was recorded, but there is lots of interesting information about the incident on N1EA's site, it could have been a much more serious incident if sparks hadn't taken matters into his own hands.
     
  7. NG7IL

    NG7IL XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    There would be no need to send "easting or northing" as that is understood in the format. Just make sure the number groups are not run together. Other wise an "E" and a "N" would be all that is needed.

    QTH UTM 6W 462555 E 7190291 N

    Depending on what you are doing and who you are talking with, sending the map datum would be very wise. WGS84, NAD27, ...

    Have fun and good luck,
    Gilbert KF7KPL
     
  8. KL7AJ

    KL7AJ XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    http://home.windstream.net/johnshan/cw_ss_list_punc.html

    Here is the most complete "punctuation set" I've seen. I had to learn most of these to pass my commercial radiotelegraph license...after which I immediately forgot most of them. But there are quotes and double quotes you can use for degrees, minutes, etc.

    eric
     
  9. AL7N

    AL7N Ham Member QRZ Page

    Eric...

    That is a good list of punctuation signals. Think I'll copy it and stash it away.

    As you did, I had to learn most of them for the Commercial Radiotelegraph
    ticket.

    I can confirm that "dahdidahdahdidah" was commonly used for BOTH
    opening and closing brackets or parens....

    US Coastguard did it all the time when putting out Notices to Mariners
    about this or that coastal light being out of service etc...

    Most folks won't yet recognize the new Morse signal for @ (ampersand
    as used in e-mail addresses)
    "didahdahdidahdit"....commonly seen depicted as AC, but I think it sounds more like WR myself....
     
  10. WI2D

    WI2D Ham Member QRZ Page

    I am practicing by sending QST articles. 'Polar Bear Portable' by David Rosenthal, N6TST, published in the February 2006 issue mentioned geographic coordinates of the location. So I decided to find out how to properly send them. To my surprise, search did not bring any common standards or practice. Hence is the question.
    Besides, I operate portable and may decide sending coordinates of my position in a back country.
    While more efficient methods to indicate your position are available today, measuring coordinates in degrees with minutes and seconds is the old tradition. These units are used on the most maps. So if you are navigating or determining your position using a map, coordinates will naturally be in degrees with minutes and seconds.

    Andrey - WI2D
     
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