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Critical security patch for Windows XP issued

Discussion in 'Computers, Hardware, and Operating Systems' started by KX4OM, May 14, 2019.

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  1. W7UUU

    W7UUU Super Moderator Lifetime Member 133 Administrator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    Fair enough. Fortunately in my case at least, the "mission advanced" and nothing I do would even work below Win10. Not even Win7 for much of it.

    Dave
    W7UUU
     
  2. KX4OM

    KX4OM Ham Member QRZ Page

    Dave,

    I run Win XP on the 2002 vintage Dell lab PC that used to belong to my Mother-in-law. It has MS Office on it, my only PC that does. It never connects to my LAN. I make use of the serial and parallel ports for legacy hardware, and I need Excel for the PHSNA filter plots with fine resolution. Other than that, I use Libre Office. The 3 business Win 10 PCs that I maintain have MS Office, but it's inconvenient to run up 2 flights of stairs when I need to mouse over a plot in Excel with 1 Hz resolution :)

    Ted, KX4OM
     
  3. KD8DEY

    KD8DEY Ham Member QRZ Page

    I hope Steve Austin upgraded to Linux....
    Ymmv
     
  4. KK4NSF

    KK4NSF Ham Member QRZ Page

    An interesting and valid question. For the average home user, there is not a big advantage to using an OS that old, unless there is a specific piece of software that needs it. An example of one is my ICOM PCR-1000 Radio.... the software doesn't run on anything newer than Win7, and even then it is in XP-compatibility mode. BUT for the most part, the old OS doesn't offer a lot for the average user.

    However, there are still a number of large, expensive mission-critical systems that still depend on older OS's. Many of them are ancient in computer-years, but since the software they run was custom designed for their specific tasks (like Air-Traffic Control, or Factory Robotics Control), and would cost huge sums of money to upgrade, their owners keep them in service for as long as possible.... and I can see the wisdom in that. Implementing a large (or even global ) system is costly, and if the old system is still working, why not keep it going?
     
  5. WR2E

    WR2E Ham Member QRZ Page

    I can't say I use mine for othern than an old home automation system.

    Even have one box with DOS and an amber monochrome screen! Nostalgia only.
     
  6. W7UUU

    W7UUU Super Moderator Lifetime Member 133 Administrator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    Oh, I totally get the nostalgia part!! If I had the space, time, and inclination I'd love to source a TRS-80 Model III with dual drives and an original IBM PC with green phosphor screen... I had both in the waning days of the 80s, long after they were even then considered outdated junk - but I had so much fun with them!!!

    Dave
    W7UUU
     
    AD5HR likes this.
  7. KD8DEY

    KD8DEY Ham Member QRZ Page

    Leisure Suit Larry???!!
     
    WN6U and G8XQB like this.
  8. WD4IGX

    WD4IGX Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I have, back in my dad's basement in Tennessee, a working Commodore 64 system - computer, floppy drive, monitor, and mandatory fast-load cartridge, and a working original green screen Compaq "luggable" upgraded to 30 MB (MB not GB for the youngsters) RLL HD, 360k 5.25" floppy, 1 MB RAM IIRC (of which only the first 640k is actually very usable the rest only being food for a RAM drive or print spooler) and full ISA-slot, 1200bps Hayes modem. :D

    But no, I don't use them, though if the disks haven't gone bad it would be fun to set up and play some of those old commie-dork games.
     
  9. KA9JLM

    KA9JLM Ham Member QRZ Page

    Another attempt to kill XP and force you to buy a new computer with Win 10. o_O

    I will not be installing this critical screwcurity patch.
     
    KK4NSF likes this.
  10. WA9SVD

    WA9SVD Ham Member QRZ Page

    It's not just (or always) a matter of "nostalgia." I have a flatbed scanner that isn't supported past XP, and my Palm Pilot uses XP transfer software, which is 16 bit, so NOT an option on Win 10. It is a necessity, not a luxury to keep XP machines viable as long as possible, at least until I find equivalent programs that work with Win 10. Except for updates (such as described) my XP laptop does NOT go on-line; it is just too risky, despite security software, many of which no longer support XP.
     
    W7CJD likes this.

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