CANADA REPORTS AGREEMENT TO DROP MORSE

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by AA7BQ, Jan 22, 2005.

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  1. KB1SF

    KB1SF Ham Member QRZ Page

    It now appears an intelligent exchange of ideas on this subject is not going to happen without also being accompanied by degrading, personal attacks.

    I have far better things to do with my time.

    Bye!

    Keith
    VA3KSF / KB1SF
     
  2. W0VU

    W0VU Ham Member QRZ Page

    I think he forgot to take his pills [​IMG]?[​IMG]?
     
  3. W0VU

    W0VU Ham Member QRZ Page

    I think you better go take a nap....
     
  4. VA3JWP

    VA3JWP Ham Member QRZ Page

    I have taken the time to read the nearly 700 posts on this topic, and I simply can't believe the negative feedback i've read. I can understand the concerns of the hams with code. They love that part of the hobby, and don't want to see it disappear.
    I have made it my new years resolution to learn code, regardless of what Industry Canada decides. I hear code on practically all bands I currently use, and I want to be part of the fun. Sometimes, i'll hear CW on 6M, and the band is otherwise dead, and the same goes with 2m. My point is, is that quite often, their is no other activity on the bands besides CW, depending on the conditions. So it would be nice to have the capability of using code to do some dx'ing, or just to meet some new people. After all, isn't that what the hobby is all about?. I think that has gotten lost somewhere along the way.
    Why spend all kinds of hard earned money on equipment, and not even bother trying to learn CW?. Even if your not on HF, CW is used quite often on 6m, and on 2m. Enough for me to want to aquire code capability, so I can be part of the excitement.
    I think I personally owe respect to the hams to have taken the time to learn code. In almost all situations, I have found that a ham that uses code, is more than willing to teach me what they enjoy so much. And in my opinion, anyone who is willing to take the time to teach somebody code, is at the very least, owed the respect to try and learn it. It can't be all that bad can it?...... a few cups of coffee, a pleasent conversation, and making new friends.
    I look forward to it, and hopefully, I can learn code good enough to teach it to my son someday. The thought of being an "Elymer" makes me smile, and it reminds me of the ham who got me into this hobby, VE3MIG. I can remember seeing his excitement when I passed my Basic exam, and he was going to teach me code, but he has since moved away.
    So.... to summarize my post, I guess what i'm saying is, if we were smart enough to get a liscence, and learn how to use the gear, than why not take the time to learn CW, what's the worst that could happen?.

    VA3JWP
    James Parker:D
     
  5. KY5U

    KY5U Subscriber QRZ Page

    Keith,

    Guilty! As you changed your statements from post to post, it appeared you were just trolling. I have indeed been poking you with a pointed stick on your positions and a little at you as well. My humble apology.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    This is a very refreshing attitude.

    Good luck learning morse code. It only requires willpower and determination.
     
  7. KY5U

    KY5U Subscriber QRZ Page

    On the other hand, we have hpz. ...

    Troll?

    hpz,

    From your statements it is obvious you know nothing about human interaction and/or CW. You have alot to learn about Amateur Radio beyond the 5 WPM code requirement. Good luck.
     
  8. W0VU

    W0VU Ham Member QRZ Page

    Thank you James for a well thought out post here, we sure needed it.

    73's Bob
    w0vu

    PS Hope to work you on CW soon...
     
  9. W0VU

    W0VU Ham Member QRZ Page

    As you well know Charlie, HPZ has had his ticket now for
    four months, I guess he should have it all without anywork involved in having phone privileges.
     
  10. VE7RFH

    VE7RFH Ham Member QRZ Page

    It is inevitable that Morse Code proficiency will disappear as an Amateur Radio licensing requirement, even in the USA. The only surprise is that it has hung in there for as long as it has.
     
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