Anatomy of a low frequency aviation radio beacon

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by KX4O, Aug 25, 2020.

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  1. WX7LL

    WX7LL Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Very similar to the LMM at Bethel, AK. In an ice storm, it grew so heavy it snapped a support cable, and the recoil split one of the utility poles. In spring we replaced both poles and changed the antenna to a single wire. Also included two cleaning ropes so we could walk the frost off.
     
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  2. W7IMM

    W7IMM Ham Member QRZ Page

    Now that the only published approaches at Bethel are GPS/RNAV and the LMM is now nowhere to be found...... I wonder how long it will be before they start deactivating NDBs in AK

    SEATAC airport had LOMs both north and south for RWY 16/34 and compass locators 281 and 224khz + 75mhz beacons . Both of them are long gone now.

    The 75mhz "markers" have been disappearing all over the country. Once that band is cleared out, I wonder who will get access to it? It would make a great ham band being between 6 & 2m
     
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  3. K0UO

    K0UO Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    VORs are starting to disappear too, the one near me ANY is scheduled to be decommissioned this year along with two or three hundred in the next couple of years
     
  4. W7IMM

    W7IMM Ham Member QRZ Page


    Yeah they are dropping like flies........., I'm helping my neighbor get his 76 Cherokee for sale and he asked me how I thought his "full panel" radio "stack" would improve his sale chances........
    . King Silver Crown (2) KX-170B's, with VOR/ILS, KR-85 ADF, KT-76 (NOT the "A") and a II Morrow Loran-C

    Everything works!

    I told him that it all might not have any "recycle" value at all. He didn't really like my answer at all.......
     
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  5. K0UO

    K0UO Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Your Are Right
     
  6. KE4IKY

    KE4IKY Ham Member QRZ Page

    Ok... Since we are talking navigation aids. Has anyone else noticed that civilian VORTACS (not many exist) are painted all white, while the military ones are painted with a red stripe to look like a bowling pin?

    Also... While visiting a NDB in Honduras (with an officer that was interested). We both approached it, and I noticed the antenna feedline had conically flaring insulation where it fed into the shelter. The officer started to approach it to get a good look, and I kind of had him wait a moment, as it turns out there was a sticker on a tiny feedline clamp about a 1/2" high and 3/4" long, saying "Danger, Extremely High Voltage".

    Safety isn't really a strong point in some environments.

    Thanks
    Joel
     
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  7. W7IMM

    W7IMM Ham Member QRZ Page

    There's still hundreds of VORTACS around the country. Just take a look at any US HIGH or LOW IFR chart while those VORTACS can be used with a TACAN receiver for navigation, military TACAN stations are exclusively for military use since there's usually no VOR co-located with it, and there's virtually no civilian aircraft equipped with TACAN (unless someone gets a TACAN receiver surplus and installs it themselves........(illegally too since it's likely no avionics shop would "yellow-tag" a TACAN receiver to put in a civil registered aircraft)
     
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  8. K0UO

    K0UO Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Tegucigalpa Honduras was one of the worst airports I ever flew in and out of until we flew over to the Nicaraguan jungle border taking relief supplies
     
  9. KN6EIF

    KN6EIF Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Awesome article. The idea of using guy wires as a Cap hat and a support structure is pretty trick.
     
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  10. KE4IKY

    KE4IKY Ham Member QRZ Page

    The NDB I looked at was at Soto-Cano (Enrique Soto Cano Map).

    The "jungle border" was interesting, there was a story of an armed group of Nicaraguans that crossed into Honduras to cause trouble, after being lost for a couple of weeks, they threw down their weapons and were very happy to eventually get captured.

    Thanks
    Joel
     

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