American in Germany - Callsign Licensing ?

Discussion in 'Becoming an Amateur Radio Operator/Upgrading Privi' started by DIK909, Oct 6, 2017.

ad: L-HROutlet
ad: l-rl
ad: K3QNTad-1
ad: Subscribe
ad: L-rfparts
ad: l-gcopper
  1. DIK909

    DIK909 QRZ Member

    Greetings. I am an American ex-pat who now has German residency, and I am finally getting my HAM license. :) Thankfully, I found a nearby Tester who offers FCC license testing.

    My question is: After I pass my Technician test, how will my (Vanity) Call Sign be determined ? Will the FCC issue me a DAA-DRZ callsign ? Or will they try to assign me one based on one of the 10 regions in America ? I have no American address anymore. :/

    I already know that I'll need to apply for Admission to Participation in Amateur Service here in Europe, but I'm wondering about the steps between then and licensing.

    Thanks for your input. :)
     
  2. KB4QAA

    KB4QAA XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    1. The FCC can only issue US allocated callsigns.
    2. Your Technician license does not meet the level of technical knowledge to qualify for CEPT reciprocal operating. You need to upgrade to General.

    CEPT
    http://www.arrl.org/cept

    If you are truly a legal German resident, then the CEPT program may not be applicable to you. You may need to obtain a German license since you are not operating on a temporary/visiting status. Check with local hams.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2017
  3. AB3TQ

    AB3TQ Subscriber QRZ Page

    You have a few misconceptions about the FCC Amateur Radio licensing process. It sounds like you think you can supply a German address to the FCC as your mailing address of record. That WILL NOT work. Don't let that first sentence (below) about "correct" address throw you off. It must be a U.S. Postal Address, and you have to have some type of arrangement to have any received FCC correspondence forwarded to you.

    Part 97 : Sec. 97.23 Mailing address.
    Each license grant must show the grantee's correct name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is regulated by the FCC and where the grantee can receive mail delivery by the United States Postal Service. Revocation of the station license or suspension of the operator license may result when correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address.
    [63 FR 68979, Dec. 14, 1998]

    That will establish you in an FCC region, which will determine the assignment of the next available SEQUENTIAL callsign from that region - in the license class that you have obtained. If you then want a VANITY call, you will have to apply for specific calls that are available, and are in a Group (A, B, C, D) that is available to your current license class.

    As a German RESIDENT, the only way to obtain PERMANENT operating privileges there, is to obtain an Amateur License from the German licensing authority. You can certainly obtain an FCC license, but it will only be good (use required) in areas administered by the FCC. It might also be recognized as valid in some countries, but certainly not in Germany.
    https://www.bundesnetzagentur.de/EN...anagement/AmateurRadio/amateurradio_node.html
     
  4. DIK909

    DIK909 QRZ Member

    Right on. As I understand it, CEPT is only for non-residents who will be visiting for up to three months. I plan to get my German license via the link AB3TQ linked below, so even a Technician's license should suffice - thank goodness for reciprocity ! :)
     
  5. DIK909

    DIK909 QRZ Member

    Thank you for the wonderfully comprehensive reply ! My parents' address in Florida is still my main "address" in America for official documents, so it sounds like I'll be going through them.

    And yes, I already found that BNA link. Good stuff. :)
     
  6. K0RGR

    K0RGR Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    If you do upgrade to General, that should suffice to meet the CEPT 'Novice' category in many European countries, but as a resident of Germany, not there. I don't know how the German licenses equate to the CEPT grades.
     
  7. DL2KBD

    DL2KBD Ham Member QRZ Page

    DIK909, I assume that you will stay for a longer period than 3 months in Germany. CEPT-Licences are for a maximum 3 months stay only. And a so called HAREC (Harmonized Amateur Radio Examination Certificate) won´t do the job either, because the US aren´t included in the relevant CEPT T/R 61-02. Therefore - as far as I can see - an american callsign won´t help you doing amateur radio in Germany. I´m afraid you have to go for a german callsign (and pass the necessary exam). Perhaps you contact the service center for the administration of amateur radio of the Bundesnetzagentur (the FCC of Germany). Here´s its address: Bundesnetzagentur, Außenstelle Dortmund, Servicezentrum Amateurfunk, Alter Hellweg 56, D-44379 Dortmund, eMail: Dort10-Postfach at bnetza.de. Hope the info does its job for you, 73.
     
  8. DIK909

    DIK909 QRZ Member

    Yes, we covered that earlier. ;) From what I gather, Germany has full reciprocity with the FCC for Amateur Radio testing guidelines, so I'll simply need to give my FCC license to the German authorities and they'll issue meine Deutsche Amateurfunk callsign. :)
     
  9. SM0AOM

    SM0AOM Ham Member QRZ Page

    The CEPT reciprocal arrangement for visitors' permits
    does not cover FCC Technician and General licence classes, as they have been determined a few years ago by
    the CEPT WGRA (actually on the initiative of the German Administration) not to meet the HAREC syllabus requirements.

    Further, only visitors (less than 3 months stay) can be subject to the CEPT agreement.

    For a long-term resident in any European country the only formal way to get an amateur radio licence is to apply locally and pass the relevant exams (in Germany currently "Klasse E" and "Klasse A").

    73/
    Karl-Arne
    SM0AOM
     
  10. DIK909

    DIK909 QRZ Member

    Thanks. But, as I said in my original post, I have full residency. CEPT is irrelevant.

    I am now in correspondence with a fellow ex-pat who has gone through the process; he informed me that there was no need to take any additional tests as there is German/American reciprocity with FCC radio licenses.
     

Share This Page