ad: Alphaant-1

2 Meter - 70 cm Data modes

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by KC2TJC, Jan 11, 2021.

ad: L-HROutlet
ad: l-rl
ad: Subscribe
ad: Left-2
ad: Left-3
ad: L-MFJ
ad: abrind-2
  1. KC2TJC

    KC2TJC Ham Member QRZ Page

    Does anyone use any data modes on 2m/70cm, by data I mean PSK, RTTY?

    Hard to find information on this so I am posting it.
     
  2. W4NNF

    W4NNF XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    I used 2-meter packet radio quite a bit...but that was a little while ago, I'm afraid... ;)
     
  3. KF5LJW

    KF5LJW Ham Member QRZ Page

    While permitted, there is not much interest understandably. Today a ham radio would be the last resort as there are much better methods. Even a plain ole telephone circuit with a modem is better. Think you will find few and far between to no interest.

    2m and 70cm most popular mode, not saying much, are repeaters. I thought Networking might bring new life to repeaters, but does not seem to be the case because again there are much better means. No crappy audio, broadcast-quality audio with HD video with Skype, Jabber, and Zoom.
     
  4. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Not RTTY. I haven't seen or heard RTTY activity on VHF in many years.

    But that's probably because it's been replaced by other data modes, which are very popular:

    FT8 for just "making contacts" is popular and used every day by lots of VHFers.

    FT4 is similar with a shorter exchange time and is growing in popularity for VHF contests.

    MSK144 is the predominant mode for making VHF meteor scatter contacts.

    JT65 is the predominant mode for making VHF-UHF moonbounce contacts.

    These are all very popular on the VHF bands...but not really RTTY.
     
  5. K3XR

    K3XR Ham Member QRZ Page

    From time to time I will run FT-8 on both 6 and 2 meters. The distance covered is often impressive when compared to other modes.
     
    KA4DPO likes this.
  6. N3HGB

    N3HGB Ham Member QRZ Page

    Are you talking FM or SSB? By far the most popular data mode on FM is 1200 baud APRS.
     
  7. WJ4VA

    WJ4VA Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I run FT8 on 2m and can on 70cm but have yet to hear anybody there.
     
  8. W4MJZ

    W4MJZ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Vara FM seems kind of neat. Potential to be way faster than old packet. I'm disappointed in VHF/UHF because even with just FM sound card modes, we can do a lot better than where we stopped with packet.
     
  9. VE4CY

    VE4CY XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    As mentioned above, packet radio has been a VHF staple since the 1980's. It's still used quite widely for APRS.

    I use MSK144 regularly on 2 meters for meteor scatter. I monitor the 2M MSK144 frequency (144.150 Mhz) most mornings. It's actually quite a popular mode.

    We have a local SSB chat group that meets Mondays evenings on 144 and Wednesday evenings on 432. Towards the end of the net, we sometimes fire up a digital mode called JS8Call and keyboard with each other. JS8Call allows some of the more distant stations (100+ miles) to join in when the propagation isn't up to snuff.
     
    N4OKN likes this.
  10. K0RGR

    K0RGR Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    We have two large packet radio networks here in Minnesota. The better known one is on 145.67.

    We have a local WINLINK node that uses packet.

    We used to have a net for people who use PSK31 on VHF. I think that has gone by the wayside, but it was very interesting. With 100 watts and a medium sized yagi, I had very little trouble checking into the net. The net control station was in Peoria, and we had checkins from a radius of about 300 miles. I think most of the members of that net migrated to MSK144 for meteor contacts. Meteor contacts are possible at any time - not just in meteor showers. A horizontal yagi and 100 watts might be overkill. A local ham has his antenna in the garage and makes MSK144 contacts.

    Most hams don't have any idea what can be done with weak signal modes. SSB and horizontal antennas will always beat FM unless you live at the top of Pikes Peak.
     

Share This Page

ad: vanity