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Thread: Sloper antenna plans

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  1. #1

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    I need some plans for a sloper wire antenna. When I get my rig to do 20 and 40 meters, I most likely won't have enough space for a dipole unless I make a hamstick dipole, so I figure I could go with the sloper, since conditions where I am seem to be ideal for one. There's only one problem... I can't seem to find plans for one anywhere. I've searched this site, google, etc. If I had a copy of the ARRL handbook, I'm sure it'd be there. So, can someone help a po' boy out?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    21,474

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    Sure ! Get a copy of the ARRL handbook ! ! ! I am not trying to be a smart*** , but seriously, you cannot begin to pick up the information that is found in just one copy of that valuable publication in years of surfin' the web.

    My serious recommendation is to get one about 10 years old from any number of hamfests that are coming up in the next month or so. You will have all the basics for "building a dipole" ( one of our favorite questions to fall all over, here on QRZ.COM ) and so much more.

    No ham worth the title should be without a copy of the handbook, along with the antenna book, the VHF/UHF operators handbook, etc. etc.

    I am not pushing the League here, but you really can hardly do better than to get any of those publications I've mentioned.

    Best luck, and 73. PS, I am working up a 20 meter sloping wire ground-plane to fasten to the side of my old short TV tower here, myself !

    73 again, Jim

  3. #3

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    What bands are you wishing to cover. Slopers for single band easiest to design. If You want 80 meters, expect to use at least a 60 foot tower or if you are on side of a hill a 40 foot mast.

    Radials should be kept about 0.07 of a wavelength off the ground and use about four. More better, but with diminishing returns.

  4. #4

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    I'm about a good 20 feet up easily here. I think I'm looking more for 20 and 40 meter coverage right now. What kind of angle should the sloper have?

  5. #5

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    A new Handbook is pretty expensive, but here you can buy a used one for $6.75.

    Older Handbooks are just as good and useful as newer ones are -- actually some of the much older handbooks from the 1960s are more useful than the newest 2006 edition, when it comes to simple questions like this:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp....ng=UTF8

    Nobody can answer your question properly because you didn't say what kind of sloper you're talking about:

    -A full sloper is a 1/2-wave, center fed dipole that just happens to have one end higher than the other.

    -A half sloper is a 1/4-wave, end fed wire using either a tower or the earth and a radial system or both as a counterpoise

    -The half sloper can be fed at the top and worked against a tower (to form the "other half" of the antenna), or fed at the bottom (ground level) and worked against ground

    -The length of a full sloper is 468/f(MHz) = feet. The length of a half sloper is 234/f(MHz) = feet. A typical slope angle is 45 degrees.

    Buy the book.

    WB2WIK/6
    What if soy milk is just regular milk introducing itself in Spanish?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (KI4OAE @ Mar. 16 2006,21:52)]I need some plans for a sloper wire antenna. #When I get my rig to do 20 and 40 meters, I most likely won't have enough space for a dipole unless I make a hamstick dipole, so I figure I could go with the sloper, since conditions where I am seem to be ideal for one. #There's only one problem... I can't seem to find plans for one anywhere. #I've searched this site, google, etc. #If I had a copy of the ARRL handbook, I'm sure it'd be there. #So, can someone help a po' boy out?
    www.ac6v.com . I bet you can you find a link to the answer to you question on AC6V's site .

  7. #7

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    make a standard dipole for the band of interest and then put one end as high as possible and the other wherever convenient but not within reach of someone on the ground for safety reasons. Run the feedline away from it at 90 degrees. The reason plans are obscure is because the sloper is a variant of a dipole or doublet.
    N3BIF

    It's ok, no one listens to me at home either..........

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (N3BIF @ Mar. 17 2006,19:24)]make a standard dipole for the band of interest and then put one end as high as possible and the other wherever convenient but not within reach of someone on the ground for safety reasons. Run the feedline away from it at 90 degrees. The reason plans are obscure is because the sloper is a variant of a dipole or doublet.
    [QUOTE]

    Yes, that's right. But, you can also use a metallic tower as the "other half" of your antenna.

    But, consider my DX antenna I call the Sitting Dutchman,
    today he got another radial so that name isn't appropriate.

    I live on a hill so this might require you on flat ground to have a 40 foot mast for 40 meters.

    Well, I have only a 20 foot pine cut mast, but a very deep slope towards the east, so I cut a quarter wave for
    40 feet, or use 234
    -----
    Freq in Mhz gives feet as output of the equation.

    Take an egg insulator or similar and attach one end to your mast. Slope is not really crtical, but more than 25 degrees tends to raise the lowest take off angle. ( see ON4UN.. Low Band Dxing .

    Now cut three quarter wave radials. Use 52 ohm coax, but 75 would work ok as well.
    Hopefully the end of the sloper is about six or more feet off the ground. Now attach -solid coductor of coax to lower end. Use another egg insulator or similar. Tie the ends of your three radials together and then to the "other" side of the insulator. Now attach the shield of coax to the same node, or tie point.

    Slope your radials if possible at 120 degrees around the base or lower end of your quarter wave "sloping wire".

    Viola- apply RF
    Mine works great. I work into Europe before dark on 40 cw and yesterday a VK6 (western Australia) called me on long path.

    Down side. Be careful as FCC might not like your radials below average head level, six feet. Just safety here.

    You could do all this in a circle of about 33 feet radius.

    Good Luck

  9. #9

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    Got a deal for you, a 1977 13th edition of the ARRL
    antenna book, paper back edition in fair shape for it's years that I will send to you free of charge, I will even pay the shipping do you want it?

  10. #10

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    oh yeah! You know I'll take that!

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