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Thread: What rig changed HF the most in the last 20 years?

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  1. #51

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    We should include the prices of these rigs, too - and what those prices would be in today's dollars.

    Take the IC-701. $1600 in 1978 - that's $5,554 in 2012.

    wow

    73 de Jim, N2EY

  2. #52

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    w1guh paul,

    as i remember, and granted this was a long long time ago. icom had some issues with their board soldering being inconsistent. i think they were somewhat new to solid state wave soldering (as was the whole world i think), so sometimes there were some cold solders in production, as also mentioned by alan (k0bg).

    now granted, i was a soldering fool at the time, and the go to guy with the fancy soldering station in a very ham intensive area, so maybe people just brought me the ones that needed soldering. like if you're the guy with a hammer.......

    i do remember the 701 being absolutely the coolest thing on the planet. it was so freaking small, ran so cool, and you didn't ever have to tune. i drug my feet and waited for the ft-707, but that was alot of dragging

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    11,264

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    Thanks, 'BG and 'OXP for the '701 info. The one I got in 1980 was actually a close-out just before the '720 was introduced, so by then Icom got their act together? Or maybe I was lucky.

    As a close out, I'm thinking I paid about $1100 for the radio & PS. I think I got lucky there, I got a 20A supply & believe that the standard PS for it was only 15A.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Shropshire. England.
    Posts
    17,226

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    The question is" What tranceiver changed the use of the high frequency waves since 1993 "
    Not one, because the tranceivers are still using the same method of receiving and transmitting signals on the high frequencies. What everybody is referring to are the gimmicks designed to sell the tranceivers. Are you hearing more when using 15 metres on the latest tranceiver with all the gizmo's than you could hear on the TS 830 for instance ? No, you are not hearing more which is the purpose of a radio receiver. Many times I've read that reviewers and radio analysts state that tranceivers around the 80's had a much quieter reception, and the transmitters were as good then as they are now

    Mel g0GQK

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Barberton, Ohio
    Posts
    11,218

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    The RCI-2950.

    For that matter, the entire 29xx radio line.

    They allowed (and continue to allow) more people to get themselves in trouble all across 10M than almost any other offering to date.

    Various knock-offs became so widespread that our 28MHz allocation was in danger of being completely overrun with bootleggers. The resultant mess finally forced the FCC's enforcement hand, thanks to myriad complaints from licensed users.

    People may argue that the HR-2510/2600 started this illicit snowball. They did not. A '2950 is laughably easy to modify for illegal operation whereas the later model '2510s and all '2600s require a lot of soldering work to accomplish same.
    The AR15/M16 - Irritating practically everyone since 1960...

  6. #56

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    I have been in and out of ham radio for a number of years, so I'm definitely no authority on the subject. But based on my limited experience, I am inclined to think that the CW operator has benefited more from technical improvements than has the SSB operator. (Probably the digital modes have seen the greatest improvements.)

    Narrow roofing filters combined with DSP have made it a real pleasure to copy CW these days.
    --73--

    David

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Victoria BC Canada
    Posts
    30

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    Quote Originally Posted by N2EY View Post
    We should include the prices of these rigs, too - and what those prices would be in today's dollars.

    Take the IC-701. $1600 in 1978 - that's $5,554 in 2012.

    wow

    73 de Jim, N2EY
    The early 701s in Canada had a 100% failure rate and all required up dated finals. The solder problem
    was feed through connections on two sided boards. The fix was to run a piece of copper wire through
    the feed throughs and not miss one. The mobile ssb/2m IC-245 had similar problems but I remember
    the very last shipment they had redesigned it and I think the 701 with entirely new boards and this
    very short term production run proved very reliable.

  8. #58

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    In the 20 year time frame I would have to say the Icom 706. It made 50/144 all mode operation available for younger hams raising families. And the G added 432 as well. I believe it has the most sales of any ham rig. With the remote face plate it made mobile/rover operation easier as well.

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