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Thread: Computer programming really IS fun!

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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    3763 Lyle Avenue, North Pole, AK 99705
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    Quote Originally Posted by WB5WPA View Post
    Don't know what you mean by technical, but I think the leading-edge stuff has been mentioned.

    For roll-your-own with gusto it would be: LabView. Eric I'm sure would agree ... but you might fade at the full-up retail cost (there are options ).

    Something that is worth spending some time and getting familiar with (if you want to do some real-time sim kinda stuff including mild signal processing stuff) is Ptolemy.

    Biggest thing going for it is it's free. I had it 'rigged up' on an under-powered Laptop doing some real-time sound processing a few years back:

    http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu/

    It'll take more than an evening or two to take it all in too.


    Jim WB5WPA
    One thing we got a good start on at HIPAS, but never fully developed was 3D direction finding methods. This is the art of locating radio signals in azimuth AND elevation at H.F. frequencies. This was crucial for ionospheric research, but I see some major amateur applications for this...such as locating intruders way beyond the horizon...or even for search and rescue.

    Eric
    "The more you know, the less you don't know."

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by KL7AJ View Post
    One thing we got a good start on at HIPAS, but never fully developed was 3D direction finding methods. This is the art of locating radio signals in azimuth AND elevation at H.F. frequencies. This was crucial for ionospheric research, but I see some major amateur applications for this...such as locating intruders way beyond the horizon...or even for search and rescue.

    Eric
    Any idea where the ionosondes are located that can be heard operating through the 75 meter band as far south as 33 deg. N later in the mornings even?

    Jim WB5WPA

  3. #13
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    I'd check the digisonde site map for the location closest to you. Most of them work in a very tight NVIS pattern....though some can be programmed for oblique sounding...in which case all bets are off! But start looking locally.
    "The more you know, the less you don't know."

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by WB5WPA View Post
    Any idea where the ionosondes are located that can be heard operating through the 75 meter band as far south as 33 deg. N later in the mornings even?

    Jim WB5WPA
    http://www.digisonde.com/digisonde-station-map.html

    I suspect the Austin station is the closest to you
    "The more you know, the less you don't know."

  5. #15

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    Interesting ... have heard them mornings as winter prop has picked up ... will have to verify the 'direction' (not easy for a mere mortal to do but then some of us have transcended the corporeal ... )

    Jim WB5WPA

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Allen, TX
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    Labview is great for controlling hardware, but I hate it as a programming language. Besides, I only use free stuff.

  7. #17
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    Jan 2004
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    Beautiful Downtown Colorado. (Montrose, SW corner)
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    I'm still workin on Basic, all 3K of it.

    TOM K8ERV Montrose Colo

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