Callsign
ad: w5yi
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Fun with Q-Signals

ad: L-HROutlet
ad: l-assoc
ad: l-gcopper
ad: l-Waters
ad: l-innov
ad: l-BCInc
ad: l-rl
ad: l-tentec
ad: l-AmericanRadio
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Marlborough, NH - Live Free or Die
    Posts
    4,464

    Default Fun with Q-Signals

    I remember when I worked communications centers in the USAF while supporting both US and NATO commands, we used a lot of Z signals and the occasional Q signals while servicing messages. You typically serviced messages when there was a problem with it's reception (even via data lines) like missing part 2 of 3. I recently stumbled upon this page. It has all the Q signals I do recall. http://www.wemsi.org/qsigs.html

    So QHZ and make sure your aren't QBN until QGN. And make sure you're QGW!
    Nevermind...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    4,835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KB1NXE View Post
    It has all the Q signals I do recall.

    It doesn't have QLF...............Much needed for some CW op's.





    Tom KCW

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    just North of Dauphin Island, Ala.
    Posts
    7,477

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KC0W View Post
    It doesn't have QLF...............Much needed for some CW op's.





    Tom KCW
    GUHOR......

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Marlborough, NH - Live Free or Die
    Posts
    4,464

    Default

    Ahhhh. Z-Signals. http://www.radiotelegraphy.net/zsignals.htm

    I think ZBM 1 and 2 could be used frequently????
    Nevermind...

  5. #5

    Default

    Couple of things:

    There used to be, may still be, an amateur radio operator who had no use of his arms and who did send CW with his feet. He actually sent very well and he often sent QLF (not QLF?).

    The late Dave Osborn, K9BPV (ex W2ZSK) used to sign off with QBE and not QRT. Dave was an airborne radio operator for the U.S. Navy when trailing wire antennas were used by a lot of aircraft. QBE basically means that the trailing wire antenna is going to be "reeled in" which, of course, meant that no more transmissions would be forthcoming. He used QBE even on phone and, if someone had not "worked" him before, they would almost always ask what QBE meant. Dave would then "educate" the other operator.

    Glen, K9STH

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Concord, NC (near Charlotte)
    Posts
    10,532

    Default

    Legend has it that CW nets with little traffic sometimes had ops pull the quick in-and-out drive-by: QRU QRV QRT.
    Last edited by WA4BRL; 11-28-2012 at 06:15 AM.
    73, Steve
    42 years in Amateur Radio

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    14,978

    Default

    On my main computer, I used WinMorse to replace some of the event sounds with Q-signals. When a program starts, I hear QRV. And, because I hate talking machines, I no longer hear the annoying and ungrammatic "You've got mail." Instead I hear QNU. And when I close a program down, I hear 73.

    And one of the last Navy airship sparkies lives locally. He and I were team members through a numner of VE sessions.
    Steve

    If you have to worry about the cost of HF e-mail, you can't afford the boat.

    CW: The mode that accomplishes the most with the least circuitry, the least spectrum, and the least power.

    What hath God wrought?
    He hath wrought that pounding brass still kicks .- ... ...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •