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Thread: Computer slowing down

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  1. #41

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    It's simple.

    As you use the computer more and more it goes slower and slower.

    When it gets too slow, get a new computer and start over.
    What if soy milk is just regular milk introducing itself in Spanish?

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by VA3CSS View Post
    It's not by design at all. It's called regular maintenance. Something every computer, running any OS, would need.

    But you can blame Microsoft if you want.
    I can give you a list of computers and operating systems that don't if you really want.

  3. #43
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WB2WIK View Post
    It's simple.

    As you use the computer more and more it goes slower and slower.

    When it gets too slow, get a new computer and start over.
    There actually is a lot of truth to that.
    We start out with a new computer.
    We start out with a set of software we are comfortable with.
    The software gets updates, as time goes on the software gets more boated.
    The bar has been shifted up in terms of minimum performance as new processors and chopsets emerge.

    About ten years ago I still had rattling around here a 133MHZ 486 computer.
    I had Windows NT 4.0 workstation on it 32Megs of ram and a few apps.
    One of the Apps was IE 3.0 Which ran really well on that computer.
    When I upgraded up to IE 5.0 the browsing performance fell by over fifty percent.
    That is just one application change, multiply that by a dozen apps and a big pile of OS updates.
    Oh and those apps run soooooooooooooo Much slower on a 5400RPM IDE drive
    When it's time, and it may be sooner than you think.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by VA3CSS View Post
    It's not by design at all. It's called regular maintenance. Something every computer, running any OS, would need.

    But you can blame Microsoft if you want.
    Interesting - I've got machines, several in fact - that have been running nearly non-stop for over 5 years - and they don't slow down.

    But you're right - these machines I've got have had nothing done to them except configuration and software updates. Most of them are on public IPs (open to the I-net) - I must be doing some great maintenance by ignoring them.

    But - I don't use Redmond's product's - by choice. After nearly 15 years of servicing, maintaining Windows systems and watching folks buy stuff to make their OS 'better' - I've instead chosen to simply use something that works. And keeps on working. And you're right - MS does NOT design them to fail. It's more like they fail due to an apparent lack of design.

    There are choices - learn the options use them. And be happy with what you've chosen - or accepted. FWIW, Windows 7 does seem to be a real improvement. Most end user installs only beg to be re-installed ever couple of years or so.
    Last edited by KA7O; 04-07-2012 at 02:33 AM.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by KA7O View Post
    FWIW, Windows 7 does seem to be a real improvement. Most end user installs only beg to be re-installed ever couple of years or so.

    And that's DIFFERENT from any other version of MS Windoze, HOW?

    But how do we know Win 7 "begs to be reinstalled every couple of years or so..." How long has Win7 been on the market?

  6. #46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
    Windows 7 was released to manufacturing on July 22, 2009, and reached general retail availability worldwide on October 22, 2009,
    Been seeing Win 7 machines that require reinstalls for about 18 months now.

    Seems a fair claim.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by KA7O View Post
    Been seeing Win 7 machines that require reinstalls for about 18 months now.

    Seems a fair claim.
    SO, is that any different from previous versions of Windows? It was easy (but not necessarily convenient) to reinstall Win OS's prior to XP. With the activation scheme from XP on, if you were with a client that didn't have all their documentation (I assume if they have an original install disk, they are legit; no disk without EULA, or decal on the box, I walk away. I won't work on pirated software.) or misplaced their original license number, the box becomes a big paperweight, that wasted at least an hour or two of MY time, as well as the time and $ of the client.) And I've had times trying to "activate" a machine via phone; several times "hold" turned into a "hang up."

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by WA9SVD View Post
    SO, is that any different from previous versions of Windows? ....
    Uh - no.

    That was kinda my point.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by KA7O View Post
    Been seeing Win 7 machines that require reinstalls for about 18 months now.

    Seems a fair claim.
    What are the reasons for reinstalling the operating system?
    I have clients who have had Windows Seven since it was released and they are still running the same install. The systems run fine and have not slowed down.
    The only reason for slowdown would frequent installation and removal of software leaving he registry full of no longer useful keys. There is a hardware issue with early solid state drives that suffer performance loss due to poor or the lack of on-drive management firmware. Reformatting and reinstalling the OS periodically cures this, but that is not a Windows issue.

    I would also point out;
    I ran Windows from September 2001 to the end of February 2012 and I only had need to reinstall the operating system four times over that period of time. Once was for a drive upgrade and I actually didn't need to reinstall it then, I could have cloned the drive but chose to reinstall the OS.
    Last edited by AF6LJ; 04-09-2012 at 01:50 PM.
    When it's time, and it may be sooner than you think.

  10. #50
    Join Date
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    Houston Texas
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    5,167

    Default wpa.dbl

    Quote Originally Posted by WA9SVD View Post
    SO, is that any different from previous versions of Windows? It was easy (but not necessarily convenient) to reinstall Win OS's prior to XP. With the activation scheme from XP on, if you were with a client that didn't have all their documentation (I assume if they have an original install disk, they are legit; no disk without EULA, or decal on the box, I walk away. I won't work on pirated software.) or misplaced their original license number, the box becomes a big paperweight, that wasted at least an hour or two of MY time, as well as the time and $ of the client.) And I've had times trying to "activate" a machine via phone; several times "hold" turned into a "hang up."
    If you make a backup of the System file wpa.dbl you can bypass the Windows Registration BS.

    Once you over-write the wpa.dbl system file by doing a OS re-install, the wpa.dbl needs to be re-registered.

    Your system is held hostage by MS.
    "Theory only works perfect in a vacuum." KA9JLM Don

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