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View Poll Results: More Tech phone?

Voters
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  • Yes

    65 22.26%
  • Yes with conditions (explain)

    14 4.79%
  • No

    203 69.52%
  • Don't care

    10 3.42%
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Thread: Should Technicians be given 17m, 12m, and 10m phone?

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  1. #91
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Hudson, Fl
    Posts
    49

    Default

    a test that can obviously be passed with just a little effort with a good memory
    there are outfits guaranteeing people that they can get their extra in a couple of weekends!
    But then again, you can also pass the extra by understanding the theory, having decent math skills, and have a solid idea of operating modes/procedures/privileges.

    Pretty sure that will take more than a weekend of cramming.
    [I][I]“There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.” [I]- Thompson[/I][/I][/I]

  2. #92

    Default

    I'd say give techs full access to 10M. Not in agreement about 17 and 12, however.
    Corey, KC2UGV

  3. #93
    NY7Q Guest

    Default

    no, absolutely no ! ! ! !

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    4,970

    Default

    Gimme ... gimme ... gimme ... Gimme ... Gimme ....
    ... NO ...

    Then again ... it appears some of them already are there...! Damn sad...

  5. #95

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by W0LPQ View Post
    Gimme ... gimme ... gimme ... Gimme ... Gimme ....
    ... NO ...

    Then again ... it appears some of them already are there...! Damn sad...
    Yep, every ham thinks they have some right to public RF...
    Corey, KC2UGV

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    14

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    I am going to present a tottally different point of view that many may not agree with at all.If my observations and opinions cause any consternation or dissent so be it but that is not my intent. I have been a long time SWL,tinkerer and prolific reader/listener and question asker. I had wanted to get into Amateur radio for a long time and had growing up a few hams around me most notably my Father. So now having time in my life and not constantly travelling I decided to go and at least get the Tech portion under my belt. I signed up for a 6 week course 3 hours a week for six weeks for a total of 18 hours. Now for me I already knew quite a bit of what was in the book and taking my tech test was a walk in the park. In fact I missed 3 lessons as work conflicted with classes. My instructor was and is a great guy and a very experienced ham and a very respected professional teacher and elmer.

    All of the people in my class were great people and all for their own reasons wanted to get into Amateur Radio. However a good 50% of them at least had quite openly stated that they were far more interested in being on the air than ever trying to fix something or indeed homebrewing a bit of kit. Mostly the Electrical and Electronic theory was looked upon as something to be endured in order to get ones ticket.

    Most of the people who attended the same class as I had no real idea of how many different aspects,or different paths you could follow within the hobby.
    I personally think a longer course with a more hands on approach would ultimatley benefit Amateurs just starting out. I think a more structured course in regards to operating procedures and rules and regs and does and donts would benefit prospective hams a lot better. Yes sure we have a great local club with great people who are only too pleased to give their time and help out the new guys. Its ok to look in a book and talk of resistance and capacitance but at the end of the day if you cant recognise what a resistor or capacitor physically looks like then whats the point in the first place?

    Should 10 meters be all the way open for Technicians? Yes I believe it should. There also should be no restrictions on mode. However just blindly giving everyone anything they want does not often work well so should extra privelleges on extra bands be granted to Tech's? No I think its all good the way it is. Everyone in my class rushed out and bought 2 meter rigs and handhelds and checked the ULS 3 times a day until they got their call. Good on them I hope they all have a long and rewarding time in the hobby. Personally I have no interest in 2 meters or 70cm or repeaters and the like so a bit more room to manouvere on 10 meters with less restrictions would be good. Though in all reality I plan on taking my general at Dayton and at the rate I am saving at the moment I will have held my general for quite some time before I get a decent HF rig that will do what I want it to.

    In short maybe the Tech and General course could be presented in a more hands on approach with more operating procedure and with more instruction on
    rules regs and does and donts. All of course presented in a fun and lighthearted way. I am sure a much different approach when a prospective ham enters the hobby would make them more apt to stay with the hobby thus ensuring a good future for us all.

    As for should CW be a requirement. No it should not. Just as I have stated that I have no interest in 2 meters etc another person may have no interest in learning code. After I have taken my general I plan on learning code but to be able to do it at my own pace and in my own time I am sure will in the long run make me a better operator than say if I was required to do it as part of a test in order to gain extra band privelleges. Lets face it you either want to learn code or you dont.

    Maybe just a 2 tier system would work best. Tech and then General. However raise the bar a bit on both.

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    2,827

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    I am not against expanding their access to 17, 12 and all of 10. Yes the General isn't that hard to get but I see nothing wrong with giving techs a bit more to continue having the spectrum utilized. With that said there is a lot of fun to be had above 50Mhz as well and it would be nice to see that spectrum utilized.
    73'
    +Steve/KJ5T

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    in a seaside village
    Posts
    2,066

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IANOFPA View Post
    I personally think a longer course with a more hands on approach would ultimatley benefit Amateurs just starting out. I think a more structured course in regards to operating procedures and rules and regs and does and donts would benefit prospective hams a lot better. Yes sure we have a great local club with great people who are only too pleased to give their time and help out the new guys. Its ok to look in a book and talk of resistance and capacitance but at the end of the day if you cant recognise what a resistor or capacitor physically looks like then whats the point in the first place?
    Well, it might be a better idea for clubs to lengthen the course and teach the Tech and General theory at the same time. Perhaps an integrated textbook which combines the Technician and General syllabi, plus some more intensive instruction on electronics, would prepare new hams for most privileges right out of the box. Such a course would also set students on their way to Extra without much more preparation. If the FCC will not allow for a further simplification into two exams, it'd be better in the interim to get more new hams licensed as Generals for their first ticket.
    Last edited by AB2T; 04-04-2012 at 05:06 PM. Reason: No trolling

  9. #99

    Default

    Back in 1968 we were given (I'm being nice to the ARRL and FCC here) Incentive licensing . . .

    Novices lost their 2 meter phone privileges, because it was believed that they'd get stuck with their Gooney Boxes and Benton Harbor Lunch boxes and not advance up the ladder in the one-year non-renewable lerner's permit called the Novice license.

    I think they were right. I could have made a contact on 2 meter FM once (crystal controlled, <75 watt input) and I kinda wish I had, just for bragging rights. Now that VHF operation on 2 meters and 70 cm are the better half of ham oerations in the US, it is a moot point.

    I believe that the Tech license was originally intended to foster developmental work on the VHF bands, which is anathema to the present-day Tech who abhors CW or anything to do with it. Having phone privledges on 10 meters was there only to ENCOURAGE modification of SSB CB radios and to populate 10 meters when the sunspot numbers were low. Has that happened? Only that a lot of those Yaesu FT101 transceivers that started out on 11 meters was now being used on 10, as intended by the manufacturer.

    Even with the loss of the code requirement, the chronic CB freebander won't upgrade, not just because he/she/it doesn't want to learn Morse; they simply don't WANT TO LEARN anything besides how high their wattmeter swings with dirty linear amplifiers.

    That's the key point -- LEARNING. I've been at this hobby for 44 years, and a professional in electronics for almost that long, and I still haven't learned all there is to learn about ham radio. If I could measure myself, I'd say maybe 20-25% of the hobby I know and understand; the other 75% is out there to be discovered by me, and others. Not necessarily in that order.

    Gary WA7KKP

  10. #100

    Default

    I say YES 100% the Hobby is about to die if we don't do something.

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