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Thread: How to make a 60khz antenna

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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default How to make a 60khz antenna

    http://ericnichols.net/wwvb.pdf

    Here's an interesting report on the WWVB antenna. Note at the end how the performance is calibrated using Helmholz coils. This is the only way of generating an ABSOLUTE field for measuring antenna gain and such.

    Eric
    "The more you know, the less you don't know."

  2. #2
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    Default

    Cool more interesting reading when I get back this evening..
    Thanks...
    When it's time, and it may be sooner than you think.

  3. #3
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    We've got a WWVB receiver and two antennas the boss would probably part with -- anyone interested?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by KF5FEI View Post
    We've got a WWVB receiver and two antennas the boss would probably part with -- anyone interested?
    How big is the antenna? big and thick ferrite rod type antenna?
    73, Jim AD2U /6

  5. #5

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    The automatic synchronizing clocks and wristwatches mostly use the 60 kHz WWVB signal and work in many places with an antenna that's inside the wristwatch.

    Armed with that information I should be able to make lots of contacts on 160 meters with an antenna implanted behind my ear, like the RFID for a dog.

    In fact, I do have one of those. Ever since, I've had this need to chase cars...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by WB2WIK View Post
    The automatic synchronizing clocks and wristwatches mostly use the 60 kHz WWVB signal and work in many places with an antenna that's inside the wristwatch....
    I think WWVB send 1 bit of information per second, so it is a narrow band system, roughly the band width is in the order of 1 Hz.

    My "atom" WWVB syncing clock will not work if I put a cordless phone (not a cell phone) within 8 inch of it, due to DC-DC converter noise.
    Last edited by AD2U; 10-07-2010 at 11:19 PM.
    73, Jim AD2U /6

  7. #7

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    One evening, with very little to do, I was reading about WWVB and its transmissions on 60khz. I then realized my ICOM 756pro tuned down to 30khz.

    Curiousity got to me and using my 80 meter 1/4 wave vertical, tuned down to 60khz and low and behold I heard the transmission fairly easily. Here is a recording of it as I heard it. It sounds like CW, but it isn't. Later, I found a program on the internet that will decipher the data but can't remember where I got that program.

    K2WH
    Attached Files Attached Files

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by K2WH View Post
    One evening, with very little to do, I was reading about WWVB and its transmissions on 60khz. I then realized my ICOM 756pro tuned down to 30khz.

    Curiousity got to me and using my 80 meter 1/4 wave vertical, tuned down to 60khz and low and behold I heard the transmission fairly easily. Here is a recording of it as I heard it. It sounds like CW, but it isn't. ...K2WH
    On each second, the WWVB will reduce carrier power by 17 dB - the duration of this reduction means one of the following

    1) 0.8 second - it is the marker bit, sent on 0, 9, 19,... 59 second of the minute.

    2) 0.2 second - it is the zero bit (binary 0)

    3) 0.5 second - it is the one bit (binary 1)

    The are 53 bits in a one minute period, excluding the 7 marker bits.

    Of the 53 bits, 11 bits are not used and sent as 0s, the rest of 42 bits send current time in BCD format.
    73, Jim AD2U /6

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by AD2U View Post
    How big is the antenna? big and thick ferrite rod type antenna?
    IIRC, it is a piece of 3" or 4" PVC and is pretty heavy, so it probably is a ferrite rod antenna. They are commercially made and have a name plate, etc... on them.

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