Callsign
ad: dxeng
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Lightning Arrestor for Ladder Line Feed

ad: L-HROutlet
ad: l-assoc
ad: l-innov
ad: l-WarrenG
ad: l-tentec
ad: l-Waters
ad: l-rl
ad: l-gcopper
  1. #1

    Default Lightning Arrestor for Ladder Line Feed

    Can anyone recommend a good lightning arrestor to use for ladder line feed line on an 80 through 10 meter wire antenna system? I have seen many lightning protection devices for use with coax, but cannot seem to find one for ladder line.

    I suppose I could just put a knife switch at the line's entrance to the shack, but I would like something that I can just leave in the line and not have to remember all the time.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks,
    -Danny
    [URL="http://www.dannyweiss.net"]Danny Weiss - W6SO[/URL]
    [URL="http://www.dannyweiss.net/contact"]E-mail Contact Page - Danny Weiss[/URL]

  2. #2

    Default

    There are several on the market for balanced lines.

    The model 878 shown here is one of them: http://www.thewireman.com/prodpix5.html

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Middle East - Iowa that is.
    Posts
    306

    Default SparkLightning Arrester

    It appears WIK and I hit "SEND" at the same time. I think his solution is better.

    I don't know how these would affect your impedance but what if you used two of these,

    http://www.dxengineering.com/Product...D=48&DeptID=19

    One in each line?

    Another route might be to use a spark gap: On one of the spreaders (maybe nearest the house), bring a wire from each line toward each other and space them say 1/8" apart with the ends in an "L" shape; then apply a lot of silicone sealer to keep out moisture.

    Phil - AC0OB

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Marlborough, NH - Live Free or Die
    Posts
    4,842

    Default

    If you look at the Wireman product, and not to detract from it, it's nothing more than a couple of lawn mower spark plugs screwed to a plate with a cap covering the electrode end. If you borrow from this idea (unless it's patented) you should be able to make your own for about $10.00
    Nevermind...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Jacuzzi
    Posts
    12,449

    Default

    Common spark plug from the Champion spark plug company.

    Installation example photo here:
    Last edited by KC8VWM; 03-12-2010 at 01:19 AM.
    73 de Charles - KC8VWM
    North American QRP CW Club #3159, SKCC# 5752

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KB1NXE View Post
    If you look at the Wireman product, and not to detract from it, it's nothing more than a couple of lawn mower spark plugs screwed to a plate with a cap covering the electrode end. If you borrow from this idea (unless it's patented) you should be able to make your own for about $10.00
    Yep, that's what it is. Even if it were patented (I doubt it), you could copy it for your own use just fine. Patent protections don't cover private use.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    1,030

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KC8VWM View Post
    Common spark plug from the Champion spark plug company.

    Installation example photo here:
    Non resistor plugs are getting hard to find these days...
    73 de N4CR, Phil

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Jacuzzi
    Posts
    12,449

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AI4OF View Post
    Non resistor plugs are getting hard to find these days...
    Yes Phil is absolutely correct, the "non resistor" variety is the correct choice.

    Here's one such example available at one of the big chain autoparts stores
    73 de Charles - KC8VWM
    North American QRP CW Club #3159, SKCC# 5752

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska, USA
    Posts
    1,498

    Default Ladder Line lightning arrestor

    Simple spark gap from each feeder wire to a ground plate.

    Can be made a couple different ways:
    1. Two Non-resistor spark plugs screwed into a ground plate or bar.
    2. Stand off an insulator block on the ground bar and thread two studs through it. Make the ends of the studs pointed, run them very close to the
    grond bar (very small air gap). Attach the feeder wires to the other end of the studs with ring terminals or something similar.

    Mount the thing OUTSIDE the house and bond it well to the electrical
    service ground as well as connecting it to a driven ground rod with a short direct heavy solid wire.

    The close air gaps will ionize and dump static accumulations just fine.

    Also (hopefully) they will discharge larger potentials from nearby lightning strikes by offering a path of least resistance that will work instead
    of the surge following the feeder leads inside.

    If the main lightning strike hits your antenna directly, it won't make any difference.
    AL7N

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    3,452

    Default

    I had a ladder-line fed dipole up for 5 years before it blew down. Never had a lightning arrestor, never had a problem. And we have LOTS of lightning. Also have coax-fed dipoles/verticals. No arrestors. No problems.

    paul

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •